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The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1864., [Electronic resource], The question of Exchange — arrival of Confederate prisoners from Point Look out. (search)
red them as they were attempting to cross the river, on the following night. The next night these soldiers guarded the river, and no attempt was made, but on Saturday the prisoners made their way up the country and crossed the river to Blacktston's island, from whence they, on Sunday morning, lled the steamer Ella, having on board Com of Acting Master McGonnell, by whom they were taken on board and handsomely entertained, and at the Navy Yard at noon, having been ten days on the read from Richmond. Miscellaneous. The Yankees still believe that Sherman has captured Selma, Ala., and "a Private letter from Vicksburg" announces that he captured five gunboats there. They had nor heard the news. Near Grand Lake, Miss., on the 14th ult., a company of the "1st Mississippi (colored) Infantry" was sent out foraging, and were fallen upon by Confederate and every one, except death, slaughtered. Some were to the ground with and some had their Brains Knocked out. Others were sh
nd fifty men, got separated from the rest. The other detachments succeeded in rejoining Gen Kilpatrick, but nothing has been heard of this one. Strong hopes are entertained that, with his usual determination, he has cut his way through with at least a part of his hundred and fifty men. Gen. Kilpatrick had advanced down the Brook pike from Ashland, having torn up the rails at that point, destroying the telegraph line, etc. At one station the operator succeeded in sending a dispatch to Richmond announcing that the Yankees were coming. Our troops reached the outer fortification early on Tuesday morning. Riding rapidly forward the outer line of works was entered, and the rebels, being surrounded, threw down their arms — many of them surrendering, and others taking to their heels. A fight ensued for the next line, but the batteries were too much for them, and so with his battery Gen. Kilpatrick opened upon the city. Acting the wiser part, however, Gen. K., hearing the shri
to supply him by railroad. As soon as this was done he made preparations to move forward, hoping soon to recapture Knoxville. Our scouts were already within one mile of that city. Everything was propitious. At this juncture orders came from Richmond, detaching nearly all the cavalry from Longstreet's command and sending them to Gen Johnston.--This was taking from Longstreet what he could not spare in his forward movement. He telegraphed this fact to Richmond, and also said that unless thisRichmond, and also said that unless this order was countermanded he would be obliged to fall back. The order was not countermanded. The cavalry left for their new field of operations. Longstreet was compelled to fall back to Greenville. The army is in splendid condition, well clothed and shed, and when they meet the enemy will fight as of yore. The ranks are filling up rapidly, and a just system of furloughs having been instituted, the men can visit their homes and families, and always return in splendid spirits. The differe
100 Dollars reward will be paid for the apprehension of my negro man William the residence of Dr Samuel P Christian, in New Kent, on Sunday, the 11th inst, and has not been heard of since. William is a likely negro, 24 years old colored, though not a mulatto, and about the usual height. His wife is in Richmond at the boarding house of Mrs Joter, on Grace street, St. church. He may be lurking about the residence of Dr Christian, in New Kent. The above reward will be paid for his delivery to me Richmond, or secured in any jail so that I can get John N Gordon. [ap 18--6t]
Philadelphia," Miss Anna Dickinson Mr. Seward's optimism is accepted without thought or comment; no sound of war save the occasional boom of cannon being tried at the Navy Yard (a sound soothing to Yankee vanity) ever flutters the senses; Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Chase openly, and Mr. Seward secretly, are speculating much more as to their chances for the next Presidency than as to the strength of Gen. Lee or the designs of President Davis. Proceed next to New York, and the recollections of Richmond, blurred by intercourse with Washington, fade into the hazy distance, and can be recalled only by a vigorous effort of the understanding. But as he journeys northwards from Washington the passenger cannot but dreamily contrast the memory of his recent sufferings upon the overtasked railroads of "Dixie" with the speed, the comfort and the roominess of the Northern car. I shall not attempt to carry your readers into Broadway — a thousand times described, but as indescribable as Niagara — nor
The Daily Dispatch: May 6, 1864., [Electronic resource], The impending battle on the Rapidan — the enemy on the PeninsulaIron Clads and transports in James river — troops landed at Bermuda Hundreds, &c. (search)
ts. The force at West Point having completed the repairs to the wharf are busily engaged rebuilding the railroad in this direction. It is ascertained from a source deemed worthy of credit that the enemy have a force of six thousand men at Williamsburg, and that the negro troops from Gloucester Point have all been sent to Burnside. A deserter, who reached the city yesterday evening from the Yankee army on the Peninsula, states that it is generally under stood among the troops that Richmond is to be attacked by a combined movement of several different columns and a fleet of gunboats and turreted monitors. Official information was received yesterday afternoon of the advance up James river of thirty four gunboats, monitors and trans ports. At last accounts they had reached Bermuda Hundreds, on the south side of James river, just above the mouth of the Appomattox, and were landing at that point in considerable force. Bermuda Hundreds is in Chesterfield county, and is 55 mi
The Daily Dispatch: May 7, 1864., [Electronic resource], Change in the Department command of Richmond. (search)
Change in the Department command of Richmond. The following orders will explain a change which has taken place in the command in this Department: [Extract] Headq'rs Dep't of Richmond,May 6th, 1864. Special Orders, No. 104.-- III. Brig Gen John H Winder having reported for duty, pursuant to Special Orders, 105, A & I G O, current series, is hereby assigned to the command of the Post of Richmond, and will conduct the Military Police of the City and Department until further orders. By command of Major General Ransom. [Signed,]T O Chestney, A A Gen'l. Headq'rs Department of Richmond, May 6th, 1864. General Orders, no. 29-- I. Major J W Pegram, A A General, is hereby announced on the Staff of the Department of Richmond. II. The Departments of Henrico and Richmond having been consolidate by Special Order 105, A and I C O, current series, all the military business heretofore transacted at the headquarters of the Department, exclusive of the military police
Is it, indeed, a city or a village? Is it on a hill? Has it a river? How many people, and what sort of people, live there? Have they churches, theatres, banks, bar rooms, photograph galleries? Are the people Christians? Do they eat oysters? And when thirsty, what do they drink? Do they dance, ride, make love, pray, and evoke musical notes from instruments, whether of wind or string? Neither of my companions, though both had been in the United States, had ever had the fortune to see Richmond; they had even not heard much-of it except that the Prince of Wates did not like it, not finding it a town of such exquisite refinement as Cincinnati, (they understood,) and, besides, they were credibly informed that the people were always flaying their slaves alive with the twisted hide of cows; and now, before issuing forth to explore Lyon, they required me to describe the Virginia capital in such sort that they should thereafter have a clear idea in their minds of a place which seemed ab
In it, indeed, a city or a village? Is it on a hill? Has it a river? How many people, and what sort of people, live there? Have they churches, theatres, banks, bathrooms, photograph galleries? Are the people Christians? Do they eat oysters? And when thirsty, what do they drink? Do they dance, side, make love, pray, and evoke musical notes from instruments, whether of wind or string? Neither of my companions, though both had been in the United States, had ever had the fortune to see Richmond, they had even not heard much of it, except that the Prince of Wales did not like it, not finding it a town of such exquisite refinement as Cincinnati, (they understood.) and, besides, they were credibly informed that the people were always flaying their slaves alive with the twisted hide of cows; and now, before issuing forth to explore Lyon, they required me to describe the Virginia capital in such sort that they should thereafter have a clear idea in their minds of a place which seemed a
the 9th corps. The defences of Richmond — great Difficulties in the way of Taring it The New York Tribune contains some stunning revelations from Richmond, furnished by a Mr Harris, an Englishman, who had served in the Crimes, and had some knowledge of engineering. He escaped from the city, and is now in New York. His account of the fortifications around Richmond is given at great length. Here is the introduction to it: As soon as Jeff Davis & Co became fully satisfied that Richmond was to be resolutely assailed, the citizen militia were called out for further instruction and practice, and Mr Harris, although an alien, was forced to enter the ranks. Instead of appearing reluctant to do his part, he evinced a readiness and even a desire to aid in the defence of the city, and, disclosing his knowledge of artillery practice and gunnery, was made a Second Lieutenant in an artillery militia company. This led to his being sent out to the fortifications to assist in instruc
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