Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Richmond or search for Richmond in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field telegrams from Headquarters A. N. V. (search)
ine about bridges. R. E. Lee, General. Official: W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Headquarters Army N. Va., June 18th, 1864. General Wade Hampton, Vernon Church via Hanover Junction: If Sheridan escapes you and gets to his transports at the White House you must lose no time in moving your command to our right near Petersburg. Keep yourself thoroughly advised of his movements and intentions as far as practicable. R. E. Lee, General. Drewry's Bluff, 3:30 A. M., 18th June, 1864. Superintendent Richmond and Petersburg R. Rd., Richmond: Can trains run through to Petersburg? If so, send all cars available to Rice's Turnout. If they cannot run through, can any be sent from Petersburg to the point where the road is broken? It is important to get troops to Petersburg without delay. R. E. Lee, General. Official: W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. Headquarters Army N. Va., June 18th, 1864. General J. A. Early, Lynchburg, Va: Grant is in front of Petersburg. Will be opposed there. Str
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of torpedo service in Charleston Harbor by W. T. Glassel, Commander Confederate States Navy. (search)
out fourteen feet ahead of the boat, and six or seven feet below the surface. I had also an armament on deck of four double-barrel shot guns, and as many navy revolvers; also, four cork life-preservers had been thrown on board, and made us feel safe. Having tried the speed of my boat, and found it satisfactory, (six or seven knots an hour,) I got a necessary order from Commodore Tucker to attack the enemy at discretion, and also one from General Beauregard. And. now came an order from Richmond, that I should proceed immediately back to rejoin the North Carolina, at Wilmington. This was too much! I never obeyed that order, but left Commodore Tucker to make my excuses to the Navy Department. The 5th of October, 1863, a little after dark, we left Charleston wharf, and proceeded with the ebb-tide down the harbor. A light north wind was blowing, and the night was slightly hazy, but star-light, and the water was smooth. I desired to make the attack about the turn of the tide