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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 17 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 160 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 71 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 44 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 30 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 29 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Ricketts or search for Ricketts in all documents.

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o had retreated through that place a few hours before. Next morning, Gen. Bayard, Gen. McDowell, in his testimony aforesaid, blames Gen. Ord, commanding one of his divisions, for lack of energy in pushing it on from Front Royal to Strasburg, and adds, that he sent forward Gen. Shields from Front Royal with express orders to go on the direct road to Strasburg, and not cross the North Fork of the Shenandoah until near that place. He adds: After some time in getting Ord's, or rather Ricketts's, division together, I started out to tile front. I met one of Gen. Shields's aids-de-camp coming in from Front Royal and asked him how far out he had met Gen. Shields. He said he had rot met him at all. I told him he had started to go out, and he said he must have lost his way. Without stopping to see what had become of him. I took Bayard's cavalry brigade, the only one ready to move. and sent it forward by the direct road to Strasburg. I then went to see where Gen. Shields was, and f
Valley, came in a few miles farther east; and Ricketts's division of Gen. McDowell's corps advanced that the matter was grave. Ordering forward Ricketts's division, he arrived with it on the field j wing upon his center, so as to give room for Ricketts to come into the fight; but the Rebels, thougtillery duel, and took shelter in the woods. Ricketts's guns continued vocal until midnight; but of arrive, and was sent to the front abreast of Ricketts's; Banks's corps being withdrawn two miles toand very near Sulphur Springs; McDowell, with Ricketts's and King's divisions, at Warrenton; Heintzee miles north, was to come in on our rear. Ricketts's single division was of course unable to stavious; the sharp actions of Hooker, King, and Ricketts on the 27th and 28th, and the furious battle nck, Milroy, and Reynolds, soon reenforced by Ricketts, maintained the unequal contest throughout thCol. Buchanan. Gen. Tower led his brigade, of Ricketts's division, into action, in support of Reynol[3 more...]
el left. At 3 P. M., our line of battle was formed, with Ricketts's division on the right; King's, commanded by Hatch, in tdarkness arrested the conflict. Gen. Duryea's brigade of Ricketts's division, which had been ordered to its support, was jue last, by Gibbon's brigade of Hatch's, and Hartsuff's of Ricketts's division; the artillery fighting its way up the road, wg in the advance, as usual — halted and formed his lines; Ricketts's division on the left; Meade, with the Pennsylvania Reseommenced in earnest: the left of Meade's and the right of Ricketts's line becoming engaged at nearly the same moment, the fo be temporarily withdrawn from the combat. By this time, Ricketts and Meade had pushed the Rebel line back across the corn-s. Meantime, both sides were strengthening this wing. Ricketts's division, having attempted to advance and failed, had fry which for half an hour had enfiladed Hooker's center. Ricketts sent word that he could not advance, but could hold his g
eterans were hurrying to his assistance. General Ricketts, with a brigade of good soldiers, belongiovered the Baltimore pike; his left, under Gen. Ricketts, held the high road to Washington. Each havalry watched the lower fords. Only part of Ricketts's division was on hand; but the residue was eg the inequality, sent two of Tyler's guns to Ricketts; and soon — burning the wooden bridge and then easy advance of the enemy thereby — sent to Ricketts every man who could be spared. The enemy'sof his stand; but 1 o'clock was at hand, when Ricketts's three absent regiments of veterans were proely to the charge; and he reluctantly ordered Ricketts to prepare for a retreat by the Baltimore pik, marching on Baltimore by the Liberty road. Ricketts's three missing regiments had been halted at from the ravine, and took ground on our left; Ricketts's division pushing forward, through thick wooly hurled two fresh divisions upon Grover and Ricketts, pushing them back in disorder and with fearf[4 more...]<
chardson, Gen. Israel B., at Malvern Hill, 165; at South Mountain, 198; at Antietam, 207; killed, 208. Richmond, Ky., Kirby Smith routs Manson and then Nelson at, 215. Richmond, Va., siege of, raised, 168; operations near, 173; demonstration made on, 394; Grant advances on, 562; raid on, 565-6; Butler menaces, 575; Peace overtures at, 665; full of, 724; naval operations against, 726; evacuated and burned, 738; occupied by Union forces, 738. Richmond Whig, The, citation from, 30. Ricketts, Gen., advances to Culpepper, 175; is driven back by Longstreet near Hopewell Gap, 1883 at South Mountain, 197; at Antietam, 205. Riker. Col. J. L., killed at Fair Oaks, 148. Ring, Maj., charges at Stone River, 274. Riots of 1863 in New York, 503-7. Ripley, Brig.-Gen., at South Mountain, 196; at Antietam, 206; is wounded, 210. Rippey, Col., 61st Pa., killed at Fair Oaks, 148. Roanoke Island, Burnside's attack on, 74-6. Roberts, Col. B. S. [afterward Gen.], refuses to be