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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
g also Brackett's crossing of White Oak swamp. The junction of the Long Bridge, the Charles City and the Quaker roads at Riddle's shop was covered by Kearney's division of Heintzelman's corps, with McCall's division of Porter's corps — the former up connecting with Slocum's left at the Charles City road; the latter crossing the Long Bridge road a half mile in front of Riddle's shop. Nearly at right angles to the direction of McCall's line, and somewhat overlapped by it, but five hundred yards the James, the rear wagons passing at four P. M. The principal effort of General Lee was directed against the position at Riddle's shop, against which Jackson's, Huger's and Longstreet's columns were all expected to co-operate. The battle which resur. It happened, therefore, from the above-mentioned circumstances, that the whole of the fighting at Frazier's farm or Riddle's shop fell upon Longstreet's command, of which A. P. Hill's division now numbered about eleven thousand, and his own div
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
t victory. It is a striking proof of the discipline he had taught his own corps, that the news of the death, although it spread rapidly and that at a time when the inequality of numbers became apparent, produced no ill effect, led to no disorder, changed no disposition that he had directed, and in itself made the men only the more eager to carry out his orders. At the moment that his body was taken to the rear, for his death was instantaneous, two of his most gallant staff officers, Captain Riddle and Captain Wadsworth, in pursuance of his directions, effected a slight movement which made prisoners of Archer's Brigade, so that the rebel prisoners went to the rear almost at the same time, and their respectful conduct was in itself the highest tribute they could pay to him who had thus fallen. While his body lay in the little house on the Emmetsburg road, which he had passed in such full life only a few short hours before, Major Baird, his Assistant Adjutant General, was practicall
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
r front at Cold Harbor, he suddenly decamped, bag and baggage, for the south side of James river, masking his movement by covering his front with strong bodies of cavalry, supported by detached infantry. These covering troops were encountered at Riddle's shop, half way between Cold Harbor and the river, in such heavy force as to induce General Lee to suspend the movement then in progress of transferring Hill's Corps across the James. In leaving Cold Harbor, the sharpshooters were left on the picket line, and were not ordered to follow until ten A. M. Another delay resulted from the rifling of a bee-tree; and, before reaching Riddle's shop, the dropping fire notified the rear guard that the armies were at it again. At this point General Lee and his staff rode by rapidly to the front, hurrying as they did so the forward movement of the battalion. When we arrived on the ground we found that details from the brigade were already engaged with dismounted cavalry in front, with but poor s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Hancock and Howard in the first day's fight. (search)
, of General Wadsworth's command, was between me and the seminary, taking position near the railroad. Another division of this corps was moving by the flank with considerable rapidity, along the ridge and in a north-easterly direction. I had studied the position a few moments, when a report reached me that General Reynolds was woun ded. At first I hoped his wound might be slight, and that he would continue to command; but in a short time I was undeceived. His aide-de-camp, Major [William] Riddle, brought the sad tiding of his death. This was about 11:30 A. M. Prior to this the general had sent me orders to move up at double-quick, for he was severely engaged. On hearing of the death of General Reynolds, I assumed command of the left wing, instructing General Schurz to take command of the Eleventh Corps. After an examination of the general features of the country, I came to the conclusion that the only tenable position for my limited force was the ridge to the south-east of Gettys
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.81 (search)
orning: Telegram of 9 A. M. received. Until I can get more definite information of Grant's movements, I do not think it prudent to draw more troops to this side of the river. And, acting on the desire for additional information, at 3:30 P. M., on the same day, he telegraphed W. H. F. Lee, then at Malvern Hill, as follows: Push after the enemy, and endeavor to ascertain what has become of Grant's army. Later on--i. e., at 4:30 P. M., on the same day — he sent this message to A. P. Hill, at Riddle's shop: General Beauregard reports large numbers of Grant's troops crossed James River, above Fort Powhatan, yesterday. If you have nothing contradictory of this, move to Chaffin's Bluff. Just at that time, however [5 P. M.], I sent another telegram to General Lee, reiterating my former assertions, with the addition of other particulars: Prisoners just taken represent themselves as belonging to Second, Ninth, and Eighteenth corps. They state that Fifth and Sixth corps are behind comin
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
rking majority of Republicans and unconditional Unionists in the XXXVIIIth Congress. In the Senate there were 36 Unionists to 14 of the Opposition. In the House of Representatives there were 102 Unionists against 75 of the Opposition. The following is a list of the members of the XXXVIIIth Congress, with the names of the States they severally represented:-- Senate. California.--John Conness, James A. McDougall. Connecticut.--James Dixon, Lafayette S. Foster. Delaware.--George Read Riddle, Willard Saulsbury. Illinois.--W. A. Richardson, Lyman Trumbull. Indiana.--Thomas A. Hendricks, Henry S. Lane. Iowa.--James W. Grimes, James Harlan. Kansas.--James H. Lane, Samuel C. Pomeroy. Kentucky.--Lazarus W. Powell, Garrett Davis. Maine.--Lot M. Morrill, William P. Fessenden. Maryland.--Reverdy Johnson, Thomas H. Hicks. Massachusetts.--Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson. Michigan.--Zachary Chandler, Jacob M. Howard. Minnesota.--Alexander Ramsay, M. S. Wilkinson. Missouri.--B. Gratz Brow
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlan; Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe; Minnesota--Ramsay, Wilkinson; Kansas--Lane, Pomeroy; Oregon--Harding, Nesmith; California--Conness.--38. Only two of these affirmative votes were Democrats, namely, Johnson and Nesmith. The nays were all Democrats, namely: Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury; Kentucky--Davis, Powell; Indiana--Hendricks; California--McDougall.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buckalew of Pennsylvania; Wright of New Jersey; Hicks of Maryland; Bowden and Carlisle, of West Virginia; Richardson of Illinois. This measure was first submitted to the Senate by Mr. Henderson, of Missouri, on the 11th of January, 1864, and, as we have observed, was adopted on the 8th of April following. The President's recommendation was acted upon, and the subject was
, as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease. Mr. Stevens, of Pa., objecting, The resolution could not be considered forthwith; but it was taken up on Monday, and, on motion of Mr. Burnett, of Ky., divided — the vote being first taken on so much of the resolution as precedes and includes the word capital, which was adopted by. Yeas 121; Nays--Messrs. Burnett and Reid--(Rebels:) when the remainder was likewise adopted: Yeas 117; Nays--Messrs. Potter, of Wis., and Riddle, of Ohio--(Republicans.) Mr. Burnett declined to vote. It is worthy of record that on this sad day, while Washington, crowded with fugitives from the routed Union Grand Army, seemed to he at the mercy of the Rebels, Congress legislated calmly and patiently throughout; and the House, on motion of Mr. Vandever, of Iowa, unanimously Resolved, That the maintenance of the Constitution, the preservation of the Union, and the enforcement of the laws, are sacred trusts which must be executed;
sbury, Stark, Willey, Wilson, of Mo., and Wright--14. This bill having reached the House, Mr. Stevens, of Pa., in Committee of the Whole, moved April 10. the laying aside successively of each bill preceding it on the calendar, and thus reached this one; which was taken up and debated by Judge Thomas, of Mass., and Mr. Crittenden, of Ky., in opposition. Mr. Stevens tried to close the debate next day, but failed; and the bill was advocated by Messrs. F. P. Lair, of Mo., Bingham, Blake, Riddle, Ashley, and Hutchins, of Ohio, Rollins, of N. H., and Van Horn, of N. Y. Mr. Stevens at length induced the Committee to rise and report the bill; when the measure was further opposed by Messrs. H. B. Wright, of Pa., Wadsworth, Harding, Menzies, and Wickliffe, of Ky., and supported by Messrs. Hickman, of Pa., Train, of Mass., Lovejoy, of Ill., Dunn, of Ind., Cox and Vallandigham, of Ohio; and passed under the Previous Question: Yeas 92; Nays 39. [Messrs. G. H. Browne, of R. I., English, of
— Harris, Morgan. New Jersey--Ten Eyck. Pennsylvania--Cowan. Maryland--Reverly Johnson. West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey. Ohio — Sherman, Wade. Indiana--Henry S. Lane. Illinois--Trumbull. Missouri--Brown. Henderson. Michigan--Chandler, Howard. Iowa — Grimes, Harlan. Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe. Minnesota--Ramsey, Wilkinson. Kansas--J. H. Lane, Pomeroy. Oregon--Harding, Nesmith. California--Conness.--Total, 38. Nays--[All Democrats.] Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury. Kentucky--Davis, Powell. Indiana--Hendricks. California--McDougall.--Total, 6. Not Voting.--Buckalew, Pa.; Wright, N. J.; Hicks, Md.; Bowden and Carlile, Va.; Richardson, Ill.--all Democrats. But it failed June 15. in the House: Yeas 95; Nays 66--substantially, though not absolutely, a party division. Mr. Ashley, of Ohio — changing his vote to enable him to do so — now moved a reconsideration; and the subject went over to await the issues of the War and of
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