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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
J. W. Gay, L. J. Laughton, Private G. C. Nicholson, D. D. Trainham, John W. Vaden. Co. E. Sergeant W. W. Tayleure, H. B. Harrison, W. C. Johnson, Corporal John R. Turner, Thad. Branch, Robert Hatcher, Chas. M. Walsh, Private I. R. W. Atkins, A. A. Allen, John R. Armstead, Henry Cousins, Jas. R. Cowles, E. K. Daniel, R. B. Davis, Private James Dunlop, Jr., H. Fitzgerald, T. S. Gilliam, Benj. Harrison, J. R. Jolly, R. H. May, B. J. Peebles, A. S. Rainey, J. C. Riddle, F. M. Robbins, W. H. Rogerson, W. T. Tannahill, F. C. Willson, R. C. Sibley. Co. F. Sergeant J. A. Whitehorn. W. S. Davis, Corporal J. D. Ivey, A. S. Allen, R. H. King, Private H. W. Barnes, J. A. Collier, R. H. Candle, D. Eason, Private A. J. Ferguson, Joseph Gray, R. H. Harrison, W. M. Hogwood, William Hitchcock, T. W. Seward, W. E. Wacker, J. A. Taylor, Wm. H. Mitchell. Co. G. Sergeant Wm. C. Mayo, Private L. J. Dickenson, Private E. K. Gunn, Jas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
advance of the United States mail, was printed in thousands of extra copies and distributed gratuitously to an eager crowd. From that time until the end of the war the express was operated exclusively by these papers to the great pecuniary advantage of their owners. The route covered by the pony express was from Mobile to Montgomery, a distance of one hundred and fifty miles, over which the regular mail was carried by stage in thirty-six hours. This ground was covered by contract with J. C. Riddle in twelve hours. A regular system of relays was established, and the riders carrying not less than three or more than five pounds of mail matter rarely ever failed to overtake the previous day's mail. The system was an expensive one, as $750 was paid for every successful trip. Numbers of horses were killed, and one rider lost his life in a manner that has forever remained a mystery. Leaving Charleston the news was carried to Richmond by the regular route and was sent from that point—