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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Riddle or search for Riddle in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
t victory. It is a striking proof of the discipline he had taught his own corps, that the news of the death, although it spread rapidly and that at a time when the inequality of numbers became apparent, produced no ill effect, led to no disorder, changed no disposition that he had directed, and in itself made the men only the more eager to carry out his orders. At the moment that his body was taken to the rear, for his death was instantaneous, two of his most gallant staff officers, Captain Riddle and Captain Wadsworth, in pursuance of his directions, effected a slight movement which made prisoners of Archer's Brigade, so that the rebel prisoners went to the rear almost at the same time, and their respectful conduct was in itself the highest tribute they could pay to him who had thus fallen. While his body lay in the little house on the Emmetsburg road, which he had passed in such full life only a few short hours before, Major Baird, his Assistant Adjutant General, was practicall
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
r front at Cold Harbor, he suddenly decamped, bag and baggage, for the south side of James river, masking his movement by covering his front with strong bodies of cavalry, supported by detached infantry. These covering troops were encountered at Riddle's shop, half way between Cold Harbor and the river, in such heavy force as to induce General Lee to suspend the movement then in progress of transferring Hill's Corps across the James. In leaving Cold Harbor, the sharpshooters were left on the picket line, and were not ordered to follow until ten A. M. Another delay resulted from the rifling of a bee-tree; and, before reaching Riddle's shop, the dropping fire notified the rear guard that the armies were at it again. At this point General Lee and his staff rode by rapidly to the front, hurrying as they did so the forward movement of the battalion. When we arrived on the ground we found that details from the brigade were already engaged with dismounted cavalry in front, with but poor s