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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Riddle or search for Riddle in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
rking majority of Republicans and unconditional Unionists in the XXXVIIIth Congress. In the Senate there were 36 Unionists to 14 of the Opposition. In the House of Representatives there were 102 Unionists against 75 of the Opposition. The following is a list of the members of the XXXVIIIth Congress, with the names of the States they severally represented:-- Senate. California.--John Conness, James A. McDougall. Connecticut.--James Dixon, Lafayette S. Foster. Delaware.--George Read Riddle, Willard Saulsbury. Illinois.--W. A. Richardson, Lyman Trumbull. Indiana.--Thomas A. Hendricks, Henry S. Lane. Iowa.--James W. Grimes, James Harlan. Kansas.--James H. Lane, Samuel C. Pomeroy. Kentucky.--Lazarus W. Powell, Garrett Davis. Maine.--Lot M. Morrill, William P. Fessenden. Maryland.--Reverdy Johnson, Thomas H. Hicks. Massachusetts.--Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson. Michigan.--Zachary Chandler, Jacob M. Howard. Minnesota.--Alexander Ramsay, M. S. Wilkinson. Missouri.--B. Gratz Brow
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlan; Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe; Minnesota--Ramsay, Wilkinson; Kansas--Lane, Pomeroy; Oregon--Harding, Nesmith; California--Conness.--38. Only two of these affirmative votes were Democrats, namely, Johnson and Nesmith. The nays were all Democrats, namely: Delaware--Riddle, Saulsbury; Kentucky--Davis, Powell; Indiana--Hendricks; California--McDougall.--6. Six Democrats did not vote, namely, Buckalew of Pennsylvania; Wright of New Jersey; Hicks of Maryland; Bowden and Carlisle, of West Virginia; Richardson of Illinois. This measure was first submitted to the Senate by Mr. Henderson, of Missouri, on the 11th of January, 1864, and, as we have observed, was adopted on the 8th of April following. The President's recommendation was acted upon, and the subject was