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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 226 72 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 134 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 10 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
putting a stop to such incursions, I called the commander of the First Military District [General R. S. Ripley] to a conference at department headquarters, and instructed him at once to organize an exd not been fully ascertained. Reflecting upon the result of that encounter, I wrote to Brigadier-General Ripley, February 8th, 1863, minute instructions, But I consider also that the attack on S, was due to what has been termed the untiring zeal, forethought, and engineering ability of General Ripley. My letters of instruction and my official orders to General Ripley, from his arrival in myGeneral Ripley, from his arrival in my department up to the time of my leaving it in April, 1864, conclusively show that those batteries were all planned and located by me, and that I passed upon all questions relative not only to their ative range. Some shots were from a greater distance, and did not reach the fort at all. General Ripley said: The action was purely of artillery,--forts and batteries against the iron-clad ves
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
e land approaches from Bull's Bay. Suitable works were also built on the peninsula in the rear of the city, covering the roads from the interior. Indeed, no avenue of attack, by land or water, was left without ample means of protection. General R. S. Ripley, who had immediate command of the defense, recently stated that he had under his control 385 pieces of artillery of all calibers, including field-batteries, and an ample force of skilled men to serve them. When the position was evacuated degree. The belief entertained at the time by many practical men, whose official relations required them to form opinions on the subject, that they were either flimsy counterfeits or in large degree mythical, has been fully confirmed. Brigadier-General Ripley, C. S. A., and other officers of the Confederate service, whose positions enabled them to speak from positive knowledge, have furnished some interesting information on this subject. From their statements, some of which are written, it a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing land forces at Charleston, S. C. (search)
employed in the direct operations against Charleston, ranged from 11,000 to 16,000. The loss from Sept. 8th to Dec. 31st, 1863, was 14 killed and 42 wounded = 56. Confederate.--first Military District, The troops and commanders employed in the defense of Morris Island were relieved from time to time. Tile commanders were Brig.-Gen. W. B. Taliaferro, Brig.-Gen. Johnson Hagood, Brig.-Gen. A. H. Colquitt, Col. P. F. Graham, Col. George P. Harrison, Jr., and Col. L. M. Keitt. Brig. Gen. R. S. Ripley. First Subdivision, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 6th Ga., Col. John T. Lofton; 19th Ga., Col. A. J. Hutchins; 32d Ga., Col. George P. Harrison, Jr.; 54th Ga., Col. C. H. Way; 31st N. C., Col. John V. Jordon; 21st S. C., Col. R. F. Graham; 25th S. C., Col. C. H. Simonton; Marion (S. C.) Art'y, Capt. E. L. Parker; Chatham (Ga.) Art'y, Capt. John F. Wheaton ; Palmetto (S. C.) Battalion Art'y, Lieut.-Col. E. B. White; S. C. Battery, Capt. J. T. Kanapaux; A, 1st S. C. Art'y, Capt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Forrest's defeat of Sturgis at Brice's cross-roads (June 10th, 1864). (search)
came the spoil of the fast-pursuing enemy, some of which was turned upon the huddled mass of fleeing men. Sturgis and McMillen made strenuous efforts to form a line some two miles northward of the lost field with the colored brigade and a part of the troops that had been longer in action. This line stayed the pursuit for but a space and then became a part of the retreating force. Through the hours of the late afternoon and all through the night the beaten men kept on their way, reaching Ripley, 24 miles from the field, by early morning of June 11th. During the retreat the enemy had captured 14 pieces of artillery, the entire train of 250 wagons, with 10 days rations and a large supply of ammunition, and over 1500 prisoners. At Ripley an attempt was made to form the command gathered there into companies and regiments, but the enemy appeared on two sides and were checked only until the retreat could be resumed. It continued via Collierville to Memphis. The bitter humiliation o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 5: events in Charleston and Charleston harbor in December, 1860.--the conspirators encouraged by the Government policy. (search)
South Carolinians quietly took possession of the abandoned fortress, and flung out over its desolated area the Palmetto flag. December 27, 1860. It was then too dark for the citizens of Charleston to see it, but their hearts were soon cheered by the ascent of three rockets from Fort Moultrie, which gave them assurance that the insurgents were safely within its walls, while the garrison at Sumter seemed asleep or paralyzed. Sand-bag Battery at Fort Moultrie. Under the direction of Major Ripley, late of the National Army, Fort Moultrie was enlarged and strengthened. The ramparts were covered with huge heaps of sand-bags, and new breastworks, composed of these and palmetto logs, were erected, and heavy guns were mounted on them. On the same day when Fort Moultrie was seized, the revenue cutter William Aikin, lying in Charleston harbor, under the command of Captain N. L. Coste, of the revenue service, was surrendered by that faithless officer into the custody of the insurgents
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 13: the siege and evacuation of Fort Sumter. (search)
re six formidable ones on Sullivan's Island bearing on Fort Sumter, some of which will be mentioned hereafter. All the forces on that island were commanded by Brigadier-General Dunnovant, and the artillery battalion was in charge of Lieutenant-Colonel R. S. Ripley, late of the National Army. On Mount Pleasant was a battery of two 10-inch mortars; and on James Island, nearer Charleston, was Fort Johnston, which had been strengthened, and was flanked by two batteries, known as the Upper and Lowr and wiser men. That first shot from Cummings's Point was followed quickly by others from the Floating Battery, which lay beached on Sullivan's Island, under the command of Lieutenants Yates and Harleston; from Fort Moultrie, commanded by Colonel Ripley; from a powerful masked battery on Sullivan's Island, hidden by sand-hills and bushes, called the Dahlgren Battery, This battery was composed of two heavy Dahlgren guns, which had been sent from the Tredegar Works at Richmond, and arrived
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ursed Burned with a warm devotion. The joy of the Loyalists was equaled in intensity by the sadness of the Secessionists everywhere. The latter perceived that an irreparable blow had been dealt against their cause, and throughout the Confederacy there was much wailing, lamentation, and bitter recriminations. It was believed that Charleston and Savannah would soon be in possession of the National forces, and that Forts Sumter and Pulaski would be repossessed by the Government. General R. S. Ripley, an old army officer who had abandoned his flag, was the Confederate commander of that sea-coast district, See page 311, volume I. having his headquarters at Charleston. He had arrived on Hilton Head just before the action commenced, but retired to Coosawhatchie, on the main, satisfied that no glory was to be achieved in a fight so hopeless on the part of his friends. It was under his advice that the Confederate troops abandoned that region to the occupation of the National force
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
y, and about equal on both sides, amounting in the aggregate to about seven thousand each. Among the National officers killed or disabled in this battle were Colonel Bailey and Major Van Valkenburg, of the artillery, and Colonels Riker, Brown, Ripley, and Miller, of the infantry. Among the wounded were Generals Naglee, Devens, Howard, and Wessels, and Colonel Cross, of the Fifth New Hampshire. This was heavy, when it is considered that not more than fifteen thousand men on either side were ecoming storm. Report, page 124. He did not wait long. General Lee called a council of general officers on the 25th, Composed of Generals Lee, Baldwin, Jackson, A. P. Hill, D. H. Hill, Huger, Longstreet, Branch, Wise, Anderson, Whiting, Ripley, and Magruder. when it was resolved to begin the movement on McClellan's right, already mentioned, at three o'clock the next morning. Jackson was to advance, take with him Branch's troops, near Hanover Court-House, and turn the Beaver Dam Creek
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
red forward, and at an early hour in the forenoon, after some skirmishing, Cox reached the borders of the Pass. Under cover of a portion of the guns of the two batteries, he pressed up the wooded and rocky acclivity. He was at first confronted by General Garland, whose division was soon so badly cut up, and so disheartened by the loss of its commander, who was killed early in the action, that it fell back in confusion, and its place was supplied by that of Anderson, supported by Rhodes and Ripley. These held the position firmly for a long time, but, Wise's House, South Mountain battle-field. this is a view of Wise's House when the writer sketched it, at the beginning of October, 1866. it is on the Sharpsburg road, about a mile and a half South from Keedy's tavern, on the pike at Turner's Gap. finally, by hard and persistent fighting Cox gained a foothold on the crest, not far from the house of Daniel Wise, an earnest Union man. It was now noon, and up to this time only the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
so wounded. Ord's loss in that pursuit was heavier than that of the flying Confederates, who made a stand at three well-covered places, in succession. His force was inferior, and he did not pursue. The Confederates made a wide circuit, and crossed the Hatchee at Crown's bridge, a few miles farther south, burning it behind them. McPherson, coming up, rebuilt it, and on the following day Oct. 6, 1862. pushed on in pursuit. The greater portion of the National army followed the fugitives to Ripley, and their gallant leader, satisfied that he could soon overtake and capture or destroy Van Dorn's army, was anxious to continue the pursuit. Grant thought it best not to go farther, and Rosecrans was recalled. The fugitives had been followed forty miles by the main body of the victors, and sixty miles by the cavalry. General Rosecrans reported his loss in the battle of Corinth and in the pursuit at 2,359, of whom 315 were killed, 1,812 wounded, and 232 missing. We have no official repo
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