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The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arrival of Ex-President Buchanan at home (search)
dham Robertson, Rutherford, Saunders, Segar, Sherrard, Sibert, I. N. Smith, Staples, Tyler, Walker, Wallace, Welch, Witten, and Wood. --60. Nays.--Messrs. Arnold, Bassell, Bell, Boisseau, Brown, Burks, Childs, Cowan, Crane, Crump. Davis, Evans, Friend, J. Gilmer, G. H. Gilmer, Goodycoontz. Haymond, Hoffman, Huntt, Johnson, W. T. Jones, Kincheloc, Kuotts, Leftwich, Lynn, Mallory, Thos. Martin, McGohee, McKinney, Medley, Miles, Morris, Phelps, Pritchard, Randolph, Riddick, R. K. Robinson, Rives, Scott, J. K. Smith, Tomlin, Arthur Watson, Ed. Watson, Watts, West, Wilson, Wingfield, Woolfolk, and Yerby.--50. Mr. Carpenter offered the following resolution, which was laid on the table: Whereas, under the present price of Virginia State bonds, together with the unsettled state of national affairs, not anticipated as probable, or even possible, when the work of the Covington and Ohio Railroad was let to contractors, it cannot be expected or desired on the part of the Commonwe
Speech of Hon. Wm. C. Rives, last night. In consequence of the announcement that the Hon. Wm. C. Rives would address the citizens, a very large number of persons assembled last night at the African Church.--Mr. Rives, after being introduced to the audience by Marmaduke Johnson, Esq., proceeded at once to review the action of Wm. C. Rives would address the citizens, a very large number of persons assembled last night at the African Church.--Mr. Rives, after being introduced to the audience by Marmaduke Johnson, Esq., proceeded at once to review the action of the late Peace Conference, of which he was a member, expressing his confidence of convincing his hearers that the proposition which had been denounced as an abortion, a sham and a delusion, was the most complete and fairest settlement of the controversy that could have emanated from any quarter whatever. He gave his views of Mr. Rives, after being introduced to the audience by Marmaduke Johnson, Esq., proceeded at once to review the action of the late Peace Conference, of which he was a member, expressing his confidence of convincing his hearers that the proposition which had been denounced as an abortion, a sham and a delusion, was the most complete and fairest settlement of the controversy that could have emanated from any quarter whatever. He gave his views of the several provisions embodied in the Conference Proposition, examining each one in extense, and declared that they covered every particle of ground, in the most satisfactory manner, occupied by the Crittenden propositions, and gave even more guarantees for the security of the South. The grave questions now agitating the coun