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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 1 Browse Search
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very embodiment of bravery, stood firmly at his guns and hurled across the plain his double-shotted canister. A cheer is heard at last, and down the gorge comes Robinson's brigade of Williams' division, who, on hurrying to the barricade, soon thrust back the eager assailants and closed the contest. At five and a half o'clock i that seemed to make the old hills tremble and quake, a cheer was heard, and into the deadly breach, over the dead bodies of the fallen, came on the double-quick Robinson's brigade, who advanced to the assault with desperate determination to drive back the solid columns of the enemy, and save the army from disaster. Nobly they meon a slender thread, which the enemy would have severed, came up and turned the tide of battle. A nation's thanks are due to Joe Hooker, and may it never forget Robinson's brave brigade, whose gallantry to-night is on every tongue. In summing up the results of the day, I am pained to say that, while we have driven the enemy at
wing to delays on the railway, however, they did not reach the troops in time. The garrison at Larkinsville consisted of company M, Eleventh Indiana cavalry (Captain Given,. commanding), numbering probably sixty men, and a sort of amateur gathering of mounted men, who styled themselves Alabama scouts, under Captain Sparks, say thirty or forty in number. At seven A. M. all the cavalry and the anomalous scouts were sent to patrol the roads in the direction of Winchester and New Nashville, Robinson's farm, &c., with instructions to keep a strong vidette post at Colonel Province's. Infantry patrols were sent out to watch the approaches leading through the coves, in the direction of Bellefonte, Scottsboro, and Larkinsville. The intelligence which reached my headquarters from all these parties and from citizens during the day, showed that no enemy was in the vicinity, except the bushwhacking gangs of Russel, Hayes, Mende, and Wilson, which constantly invest the mountains in the vicinity
wing to delays on the railway, however, they did not reach the troops in time. The garrison at Larkinsville consisted of company M, Eleventh Indiana cavalry (Captain Given,. commanding), numbering probably sixty men, and a sort of amateur gathering of mounted men, who styled themselves Alabama scouts, under Captain Sparks, say thirty or forty in number. At seven A. M. all the cavalry and the anomalous scouts were sent to patrol the roads in the direction of Winchester and New Nashville, Robinson's farm, &c., with instructions to keep a strong vidette post at Colonel Province's. Infantry patrols were sent out to watch the approaches leading through the coves, in the direction of Bellefonte, Scottsboro, and Larkinsville. The intelligence which reached my headquarters from all these parties and from citizens during the day, showed that no enemy was in the vicinity, except the bushwhacking gangs of Russel, Hayes, Mende, and Wilson, which constantly invest the mountains in the vicinity
ades in the centre, General Ruger's on the right, and Colonel Robinson's on the left. It fought from four o'clock till long in the engagement. When they first advanced against Colonel Robinson's brigade, the rebels held up their hands as if to suplaces ere they received a terrific fire from the enemy. Robinson's brigade hastened along the crest of the hill, then facihis advance so impetuous, that it seemed for a time as if Robinson's line must surely yield. It was an awful moment. The cneath the starry folds of the flag of the Union. While Robinson's brigade was thus contending against fearful odds, Knipetretching along the crest of the hill, in continuation of Robinson's line, and forming connection with the Fourteenth corps.aught no less fierce and desperate than that made against Robinson. The awful picture of the battle as it raged at this monard of Trade battery, under the immediate command of Lieutenant Robinson. Colonel Minty broke camp and made Sandtown under co
head, there is a crackling, roaring tumult, seasoned with wild cheers. The Fifth corps has begun the fight in earnest — Griffin is pressing on. Wadsworth, and Robinson, and Crawford are going in; the latter on the left, supported by Getty, is advancing toward the enemy at Parker's store. Behind Crawford and Getty, who are on tdetached, and acting with the Fifth and Second corps. General Warren's command was still reduced to the two divisions of Crawford and Griffin and a brigade of Robinson's, General Wadsworth and Robinson being under command of Hancock. The lines formed by the two commands of Generals Warren and Sedgwick stretched from near the rRobinson being under command of Hancock. The lines formed by the two commands of Generals Warren and Sedgwick stretched from near the river, through the forest, across the road leading to Locust Grove, to within half a mile of the Orange Court-house road. Across this road, and far to the left, the troops led by Hancock were disposed--Colonel Carroll's and General Hayes' (now Colonel Crocker's) brigades on the right, and Generals Ward's and Owen's brigades on t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 59. battles of Spottsylvania, Va: battle of Sunday, May 8, 1864. (search)
column of Longstreet's command, which had been pushed in two or three miles this side of Spottsylvania Court-house, and became hotly engaged, almost without warning. Bartlett's brigade suffered fearfully. The whole division, including that of Robinson, which went in immediately on the left, received, in addition to the musketry fire in front, a storm of grape and shell from front and flank. Longstreet, who was marching with his whole force in parallel lines with us, had stationed a battery on the right, commanding the junction of roads where Griffin first met the enemy. The troops, although fighting bravely, were terribly decimated, and gave way. General Robinson fell, wounded in the leg. General Warren, in person, rallied the division. Crawford's Pennsylvania Reserves came up and steadily advanced into the breach, firing telling volleys. Their advance was continued beyond the woods, through a field, and down into a swampy wood beyond, the enemy falling back and leaving a number
ly before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into the hands of the enemy. The Fifth an
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), General Grant's headquarters, near Hanovertown, south bank of the Pamunkey May 29, (search)
ly before our cavalry could come up with it. We captured a few prisoners. Russell's division was across by nine A. M., and intrenched itself on the hills. Meantime the main body of the army had also recrossed the North Anna, and was marching over the road toward the Pamunkey. All the corps had orders to recross after nightfall, leaving our pickets in front of the line until midnight. The three brigades of Crittenden's division, commanded by General Leslie and Colonels Marshall and Robinson, were ordered to take a stand on the north bank at Oxford, Quarles,and Jericho fords, respectively, and hold them until our pickets came on and take up and destroy the bridges. This they did successfully. It was a dark and rainy night, but no confusion prevailed, nevertheless, and at midnight all the infantry, artillery, and the headquarters trains were across. The pickets were then called in, but in the darkness some lost their way and fell into the hands of the enemy. The Fifth an
inside the works, hurried up the Fourth United States cavalry, Lieutenant O'Connell, and the Board of Trade battery, Captain Robinson commanding, and renewed the attack. The rebels had occupied a new line but partially finished in the edge of the cis. I had the satisfaction of hearing the answer in the affirmative. The Chicago B. T. Battery, commanded by Captain George J. Robinson, occupied a position on the hill in the rear of my line. Their rapid and effective firing contributed greatly na mounted infantry, are also deserving of promotion for their gallantry. Here with I also hand you the report of Captain Robinson, Chicago Board of Trade battery, one of the most industrious and untiring officers in the service. Below I give yder almost unprecedented in the movements of artillery. I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Geo. J. Robinson, Captain Commanding Battery. Captain T. W. Scott, A. A. A. G., Second Division C. C., M. D. M. headquarters Sevent