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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
saic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner; Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; Nantucket, Commander Donald M. Fairfax; Nahant, Commander John Downes; and Keokuk, Commander Alexander Rhind. The admiral had arranged to lead in the the army his most vigorous support by the fire of his monitors and the Ironsides. On the 17th of August, in one of the many engagements with this fort, Commander George W. Rodgers, Admiral l)ahlgren's chief-of-staff, was killed, while temporarily commanding the Catskill, the same monitor he had commanded under Admiral Du Pont in than he, when a heavy shot struck the pilot-house and, breaking through its armor, instantly killed him and Paymaster Woodbury, who was standing by his side. Commander Rodgers was an officer of great courage and rare skill in his profession, a man of very pure and devout character. Cumming's Point and Battery Wagner having been
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
on, 4 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott; Memphis, Lieut.-Com. P. G. Watmough, Act. Master C. A. Curtis, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 30-pounder Parrott rifle, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers. Monitors. (1 15-inch, 1 11-inch, each.) Patapsco, Com. D. Ammen; Passaic, Captain P. Drayton; Nahant, Com. John Downes; Montauk, Com. John L. Worden, Com. D. M. Fairfax; Nantucket, Com. D. M. Fairfax, Lieut.-Com. L. H. Newman, Com. J. C. Beaumont; Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; Catskill, Com. George W. Rodgers. Other iron-clads. Keokuk, Com. A. C. Rhind, 2 11-inch. S. B.; New Ironsides, Com. T. Turner, 14 11-inch, 2 150-pounder Parrotts, 2 50-pounder Dahlgrens. Sailing vessels (Barks). Kingfisher, Act. Master J. C. Dutch, 4 8-inch; Braziliera, Act. Master W. T. Gillespie, 6 32-pounders; Restless, Act. Master W. R. Browne; Midnight, Act. Master N. Kirby, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 6 32-pounders; Fernandina, Act. Master E. Moses, 6 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 24-p
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
ssaic, Captain Percival Drayton; Montauk, Commander John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; New Ironsides, Commander Thomas Turner; Cattskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; Nantucket, Commander Donald M. Fairfax; Nahant, Commander John Downes, and Keokuk, Lieutenant-Commander Alexander C. Rhind. The gun-boats were the Cans a mine containing about twenty pounds of gunpowder. noon the next day, April 7, 1863 when it advanced in a prescribed manner of line ahead, the Weehawken, Captain Rodgers, leading, the others following in the order named in note 3, page 192. The ships will open fire on Sumter, ran Dupont's directions, when within easy range, ann hesitated, when suddenly the silence was broken, as the heavy barbette guns of Fort Sumter poured a stream of plunging shot and shell upon the thralled vessel. Rodgers saw that contest there would be fatal to his ship, and he managed to withdraw. Then, followed by the other vessels, he attempted to pass by Sumter, in the channe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
she might attack. Deserters from the Atlanta reported her ready for work, and Admiral Dupont sent the Weehawken, Captain Rodgers, and Nahant, Commander Downes, to Wassaw Sound, to watch her. She was considered by her commander a match for both, toward the Weehawken, the latter held back its fire until its antagonist was within short range, when a gun, sighted by Rodgers himself, sent a fifteen-inch solid shot, which carried away the top of the Atlanta's pilot-house, wounded two of her pilots, and sent her aground. Rodgers fired only four more shots. The last one struck the ram point blank, fearfully bent her iron armor, and shivered twelve inches of live-oak planking and five of Georgia pine back of it. One man was killed and sever plans, and we have failed of success. I would advise you to submit quietly to the fate that has overtaken you. Captain Rodgers said his first shot took away from the Atlanta her desire to fight, and the last, her ability to get away. He captu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
in line ahead, as follows: 1. Weehawken Captian John Rodgers. 2. Passaic Captain Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk Captain John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides Captain T. Turner. 6. Catskill Commander G. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket Commander D. M Fairfax. 8. Nahant Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk Commander A. C. Rhind. A squadron of vessels, of which Captain J. F. Green will be the senior officer, will be formed outside the bar, near tG. W. Parker; Acting-Ensigns, C. P. Walters and George M. Prindle; Engineers: Second-Assistant, G. D. Emmons; Third-Assistant, J. F. Booth; Acting-Third-Assistants, Frank Marsh and James Plunkett; Acting-Master s Mate, Peter Trescott. [Commander George W. Rodgers commanded the Catskill at Charleston.] Steam-Sloop Powhatan. Captain, S. W. Godon; Lieutenant-Commander, E. P. Williams; Lieutenants, A. R. McNair and F. J. Higginson; Surgeon, Henry O. Mayo; Assistant Surgeon, Edw. D. Payne; Pay
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
Beauregard. Gillmore's reply. death of Commander George W. Rodgers. great efforts made to reduce Wagner, Su way to disable the fleet. The report of Commander G. W. Rodgers goes to show that the Catskill was very sevlliant young officer through the death of Commander George W. Rodgers, commanding the Monitor Catskill. CommanCommander Rodgers had more than once asked the rearadmiral if he should go with him as usual or take command of the Cthe commander-in-chief answered, Do as you choose. Rodgers finally concluded to go in the Catskill. He got hi the Catskill was struck by a shot from Wagner, and Rodgers was instantly killed. This shot first struck the t were held together, fragments of which struck Commander Rodgers and Acting-Assistant Paymaster J. G. Woodbury,r-Admiral Dahlgren pays the highest tribute to Commander Rodgers, whose death was regretted by all who knew himCaptain S. C. Rowan, was hit thirty-one Commander George W. Rodgers. times, exclusive of some shots supposed
, Capt. Percival Drayton; 3. Montauk, Com'r John L. Worden; 4. Patapsco, Com'r Daniel Ammen; 5. New Ironsides, Com'r Thos. Turner; 6. Catskill, Com'r Geo. W. Rodgers; 7. Nantucket, Com'r Donald M. Fairfax; 8. Nahant, Com'r John Downes; 9. Keokuk, Lt.-Com'r Alex. C. Rhind; with the gunboats Canandaigua, Unadillaller and deprive her crew of all command over her movements, leaving her to drift helpless and useless where a few hours at most must insure her demolition. Capt. Rodgers did not choose to squander his vessel so recklessly; and, after a brief hesitation, attempted to pass westward of Fort Sumter, between that and Cumming's Point, under Captain Foxhall A. Parker; and which, in one week Aug. 17-23. of service, made a decided change in the physiognomy of that obstinate structure. Com'r Geo. W. Rodgers, of the Catskill, was killed. Still other breaching batteries were simultaneously established on the left, 800 yards farther from Sumter, which participat
ls prepared for the iron-clad vessels, will be used in action. After the reduction of Fort Sumter, it is probable the next point of attack will be the batteries on Morris Island. The order of battle will be the line ahead, in the following succession: 1. Weehawken, with raft, Capt. John Rodgers. 2. Passaic, Capt. Percival Drayton. 3. Montauk, Commander John L. Worden. 4. Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides, Commodore Thos. Turner. 6. Catskill, Commander Geo. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax. 8. Nahant, Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk, Lieut. Commander Alex. C. Rhind. A squadron of reserve, of which Captain J. F. Green will be senior officer, will be formed out-side the bar, and near the entrance buoy, consisting of the following vessels: Canandaigua, Capt. Joseph H. Green. Unadilla, Lieut. Commander S. P. Quackenbush. Housatonic, Capt. Wm. R. Taylor. Wissahickon, Lieut. Commander J. G. Davis. Hu
to do so. With a single exception I have been on board a monitor in all the principal actions, and the recurrence of casualties to the fleet captains Captain George W. Rodgers was next ahead when killed off Wagner, and his successor, Captain Badger, had his leg broken by an iron splinter in the attack on Sumter. near me shows tmer attempted to run in, and having eluded the hot pursuit of the outside blockade, no doubt indulged in the belief that all danger was past. But the gallant Captain Rodgers was in advance that night with the Catskill, and a shell sent suddenly by him ahead of the culprit steamer signified no escape. In despair or alarm the lattes my object was to show what the navy had done in this quarter, I am very glad to be able to extend the list. The loss of three fleet captains in succession--Captain Rodgers, killed in the Catskill, Captain Badger, wounded in an action with Moultrie, and Lieutenant Preston, taken prisoner in the assault on Sumter — necessarily der
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
great fight with the Guerriere soon made her name a household word to all Americans. Full of years and honors in 1861, she was lying at Annapolis as a training-ship at the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion, and was in great danger of falling into the hands of the Confederates. General Benjamin F. Butler, who was in the vicinity with the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment, sent a detachment that guarded the old ship till she was towed to Newport, where she arrived May 9th under Lieutenant-Commander G. W. Rodgers, with officers and midshipmen from the Military Academy aboard. At the extreme right of the picture is the MacEDONIANdonian, originally a British sloop-of-war captured by the U. S. frigate United States in 1812. She was a spick-and-span new vessel then. In 1852-4 she sailed in Commodore Perry's fleet that opened Japan to American commerce. The outbreak of the war found her lying at Vera Cruz. The frigate on the left, the Santee, was a later addition to the navy, also mount
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