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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 406 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 294 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 226 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 214 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 182 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 148 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 113 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 109 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 41 1 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
there without delay was necessary. General William S. Rosecrans succeeded him. On July 28th McCdistances for that purpose. At this time Rosecrans was in the Kanawha Valley with Cox's column,o the commands of Wise and Floyd in front of Rosecrans, leaving General H. R. Jackson in Reynolds'stogether, and I will delight to obey you. Rosecrans had advanced to the top of Big Sewell Mountacupying strong defensive positions. Lee and Rosecrans, having been officers of the engineers, werer occupying these positions for twelve days, Rosecrans, on the night of October 6th, retreated. Thhimself, notwithstanding the great advantage Rosecrans would have possessed by accepting it in his ot defeat Reynolds, or the failure to attack Rosecrans. The news of the expected great victories dory was missing from his brow, the scalps of Rosecrans and Reynolds from his belt. The public lookl general. In an offensive movement against Rosecrans the elements of success were against him. Th[6 more...]
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
of Northern Virginia declined the encounter, it could withdraw to the Richmond line. At this period it was determined to re-enforce General Bragg in the West with two divisions of Longstreet's corps, to enable him to defeat the Federal General Rosecrans, which he did at Chickamauga, while the third division-Pickett's — should be detached for duty south of the James River. Meade then crossed over the Rappahannock and occupied Culpeper and the country between the two rivers, so as to beI was out looking at him yesterday from Clark's mountain. He has spread himself over a large surface, and looks immense, but I hope will not prove as formidable as he looks. He has, I believe, been sending off some of his troops to re-enforce Rosecrans, and has been getting up others; among them several negro regiments are reported. I can discover no diminution. And on September 18, 1863, from the same camp he tells her: The enemy state that they have heard of a great reduction in our force
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
118, 119, 127, 186, 190, 192, 226, 227, 247, 270; killed at Gettysburg, 272. Rice Station, battle of, 384. Richard Coeur de Lion, 2. Richelieu, Cardinal, 65. Richmond, the race for, 333; Petersburg and Richmond lines abandoned, 379; occupied by United States troops, 381; evacuated, 381. Ricketts, General, mentioned, 190, 192. Ringgold Barracks, 61, 62. Ripley, General, 130. Robertson, General, Beverley, 184, 187, 285. Rockbridge Artillery, 323. Rodes, General, 249-252. Rosecrans, General William S., 115, 127, 122, 123, 119. Rosser's cavalry brigade, 353, 384, 371. Round Top, 282. Russell's division, 318, 319. Rust, Colonel, Albert, 119, 120, 121. Sanders, General, killed, 363. Sanford, General, Charles, 105. Santa Anna, General, 31, 32, 38. San Jacinto, battle of, 31. Schenck, General, mentioned, 143. Schofield, General John M., joins Sherman, 372. Scott, General, Winfield, mentioned, 19, 33, 40, 44, 46; notice of, 48; mentioned, 52, 5
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
ill the opening of the Civil War. When he assumed command of the Army of Virginia he was in the prime of life, less than forty years old, and had lost little if any of the dash and grace of his youth. D. H. Hill, Lafayette McLaws, Mansfield Lovell, Gustavus W. Smith, R. H. Anderson, A. P. Stewart, and Earl Van Dorn were among the Confederate commanders who were graduated in the same class with me. Of the Federal commanders, there were of that class — besides Pope--Generals John Newton, W. S. Rosecrans, George Sykes, Abner Doubleday, and others less prominent. Stonewall Jackson came on four years after my class. General Lee had preceded us about fourteen years. General Ewell, who was hurt in this battle, was in the same class with Tecumseh Sherman and George H. Thomas. A truer soldier and nobler spirit than Ewell never drew sword. Jeb Stuart was a very daring fellow and the best cavalryman America ever produced. At the Second Manassas, soon after we heard of the advance of McDo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
attle of Bull Run at the North,--the name of a little stream. At the South it takes the name of Manassas, from a railroad station. The second battle on the same ground is called the Second Bull Run by the North, and the Second Manassas by the South. Stone's defeat is the battle of Ball's Bluff with the Federals, and the battle of Leesburg with the Confederates. The battle called by General Grant, Pittsburg Landing, a natural object, was named Shiloh, after a church, by his antagonist. Rosecrans called his first great fight with Bragg, the battle of Stone River, while Bragg named it after Murfreesboro‘, a village. So McClellan's battle of the Chickahominy, Gaines's Mill.--Editors. a little river, was with Lee the battle of Cold Harbor, a tavern. The Federals speak of the battle of Pea Ridge, of the Ozark range of mountains, and the Confederates call it after Elk Horn, a country inn. The Union soldiers called the bloody battle three days after South Mountain from the little st
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
on reaching that place, he should find that Rosecrans had gone to Nashville, as Bragg believed. Hrned as soon as he got into Iuka that though Rosecrans had sent three divisions of his army [E. A. accordingly he telegraphed Van Dorn that as Rosecrans had gone to Corinth he would turn back and c Grant established his own headquarters, and Rosecrans was ordered to concentrate his two divisions, instructed Ord not to attack till he heard Rosecrans's guns. There was yet time for Price to oordered to move his division to the front of Rosecrans, and Armstrong and Wirt Adams were directed f our troops from that front to the front of Rosecrans, and also to hinder the advance of the Federght be driven from our ground. Thinking General Rosecrans was in the rear, where he could hurry upIf you see your chance, attack fiercely.--W. S. Rosecrans, Brigadier-General. I added a sketch s: Ducat has been sent to explain it. W. S. Rosecrans, Major-General.--S. C. Lyford, Acting Aid[37 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
The battle of Corinth. by William S. Rosecrans, Major-General, U. S. V., Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Fillmore street, Corinth, from a photograph taken in 1884.The battle of Corinth, Miss., which is often confounded in public memory with our advance, under Halleck, from Pittsburg Landing in April and May, 1862, was foughuntown and Baldwyn, Miss., with 15,000 to 20,000 men, moved up to Iuka about the 12th of September, intending to follow me; and, as he reported, finding that General Rosecrans had not crossed the Tennessee River, he concluded to withdraw from Iuka toward my [his] old encampment. His withdrawal was after the hot battle of Iuka on Ser to right than would be safe. Use your discretion. Opposite your center might be better now for your artillery. If you see your chance, attack fiercely.--W. S. Rosecrans, Brigadier-General. I added a sketch of the line on a bit of paper. The delay thus caused enabled the enemy to overpass the right of Davies so far that w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hamilton's division at Corinth. (search)
rned. I cannot understand it.--C. S. Hamilton, Brigadier-General. Rosecrans returned it to me indorsed as follows: Ducat has been sent to explain it. W. S. Rosecrans, Major-General.--S. C. Lyford, Acting Aide-de-Camp. Now bearing in mind that Davies's division was to the left and in front of mine, if this order meant a to right than would be safe. Use your discretion. Opposite your center might be better now for your artillery. If you see your chance attack fiercely. W. S. Rosecrans, Brigadier-General. As a simple order to attack the enemy in flank could have reached me by courier from General Rosecrans, any time after 2 P. M., in 15 mem two hours in a north-west direction with shot and shell, where the enemy is massed, and at midnight attack them with your whole division with the bayonet.--W. S. Rosecrans, Major-General. The Official Records do not contain this order or any allusion to the subject of it.--Editors. I was astounded, and turning to the offi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
ds for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Army of the Mississippi.--Major-General William S. Rosecrans. Second division, Brig.-Gen. David S. Stanley. Staff loss: v, 1. First Brigade, Col. John W. Fuller: 27th Ohio, Maj. Zephaniah S. Spaulding; 3th Ohio, Capt. H. B. White. Artillery loss: w, 8. Total Union loss: killed, 355; wounded, 1841; captured or missing, 324 = 2520. The effective strength of Rosecrans's command is not specifically stated in the Official Records. According to the return for September 30th, 1862, his aggregate present for duty was 23,077 (Vol. XVII., Pt. II., p. 246). Probably not less than twenty thousand participated in the battle. On page 172, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., General Rosecrans estimates the Confederate strength at nearly forty thousand and says that was almost double his own numbers. The Confederate forces. Army of West Tennessee.--Major-General Earl Van
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
tained so near to yet stronger hostile forces, and under the heavy batteries which commanded the ground on which we stood. Morgan accordingly withdrew, followed a short distance by the enemy. Our loss in killed and wounded was not so heavy as the enemy's, and we carried off a few prisoners. Only a small number of the railroad cars were burned, and the expedition was a failure. Rosecrans's army General Buell was succeeded in the command of the troops of the Army of the Ohio by General W. S. Rosecrans on the 30th day of October. Under General Orders of October 24th the Department of the Cumberland was created, and the troops within it were designated the Fourteenth Army Corps.--editors. was now close at hand, marching upon three or four roads leading into Nashville, and we were immediately in its path. Crittenden's corps was in advance, the major part of it marching on the Louisville and Nashville turnpike. Morgan sent strong detachments to harass these troops, and, if possibl
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