Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rosecrans or search for Rosecrans in all documents.

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he 8th inst., have been received. We have received the following summary of the news, through the agent of the Press Association: A Louisville dispatch states that General Burnside has driven the enemy before him southward to the Hiawassee river, and eastward as far as Greenville, on the East Tennessee and Virginia railroad. The right wing of Gen. Burnside's army is thus put in communication with the army of the Cumberland. Hooker is to command a part of the reinforcements sent to Rosecrans. Reinforcements are literally pouring down from Louisville. Eight hundred prisoners, captured at the battle of Chickamauga, have been sent to Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill. Advices from Charleston harbor to the 3d instant have been received. It was currently reported that Gen. Gillmore's headquarters had been removed from Morris to Folly Island, and that the mass of the troops and war material would soon follow. The blockade runners Diamond, Alabama, and Lizzie Davis have bee
by the people of Texas, who are rising en masse between the ages of 15 and 60. The Tribune's latest information from Pensacola states that the yellow fever was raging there. The Yankee fleet crews have been removed to Santa Rosa. [second Dispatch.] Mobile, Oct. 9. --The Tribune has dates from New Orleans to the 1st inst. No news of importance. The Era says the rebels are evacuating Richmond, and that the whole of Virginia will be abandoned. The Era thinks the defeat of Rosecrans not so bad as reported. Gold in New Orleans is at a premium of 50 cents. [third Dispatch.] Mobile, Oct. 9. --Late arrivals from Shreveport, La., state that Gen. Price is falling back towards that point, and that Gen. Taylor is falling back from Alexandria. Gen. Banks is pursuing. Banks crossed from New Orleans in three columns--one of which crosses at Lake Charles, another at Brashear City, and the third at the mouth of Red river. His force is estimated at 35,000. Ste
From Northern Virginia. --The information brought by the passengers on the Central train last evening leads to the impression that the enemy have fallen back from Culpeper C. H. in the direction of Washington. The presumption is that Meade's army has been so weakened by the withdrawal of troops for Rosecrans that he feels his position unsafe so far from his base of operations.
The position of Rosecrans's army. The correspondent of the Cincinnati Times gives the following relative to the position of Rosecrans's army at Chattanooga: After our retiring within the rebel works the enemy seemed to reluctantly follow.--They held back as if to give us full opportunity for a successful recrossing of tRosecrans's army at Chattanooga: After our retiring within the rebel works the enemy seemed to reluctantly follow.--They held back as if to give us full opportunity for a successful recrossing of the Tennessee river. But Gen. Rosecrans did not see proper to take advantage of these favorable designs of the enemy. On returning to Chattanooga, instead of placing the Tennessee between his forces and those of the rebels, he immediately called around him his Generals, and in a few words explained to them his future intended planGen. Rosecrans did not see proper to take advantage of these favorable designs of the enemy. On returning to Chattanooga, instead of placing the Tennessee between his forces and those of the rebels, he immediately called around him his Generals, and in a few words explained to them his future intended plans. This place is to be held at all hazards; we here make the big fight, be the strength of the enemy what it may! Beyond this point the Army of the Cumberland will not retire while there is a foe to menace it. Gen. St. Clair Morton, chief of engineers, immediately set about to put the place in a defensible condition for the