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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
do not know that he ever said anything pleasant about me except the day after the Wilderness battles, when I heard Hancock say that Colonel Lyman had been useful to him, the day before. To which the General replied: Yes, Lyman is a clearheaded man. I have heard him volunteer several favorable things about Captain Sanders; also he has remarked that Old Rosey (my tent-mate) was good at finding roads; and that is pretty much all of his praises, whereof no man is more sparing. By the way, old Rosey has his commission as captain. One thing I do not like — it is serious — and that is, that three years of bitter experience have failed to show our home people that, to an army on active campaign (or rather furious campaign), there must be supplied a constant stream of fresh men — by thousands. What do we see? Everyone trying to persuade himself that his town has furnished its quota. But where are they? We have large armies, but nothing compared with the paper statements. No! The few p<
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 7 (search)
The strategic object was two-fold: first, to effect threatening lodgments as near as possible to these points, gaining whatever we could by the way; and, secondly, to prevent Lee from reinforcing Early. --Lyman's Journal. I never miss, you see. Rosey drew me aside with an air of mystery and told me that the whole army was ordered to be packed and ready at four the next morning, all prepared to march at a moment's notice. Thursday, September 29. Headquarters contented itself by getting up aboarnard (a safe place to hold), and sundry other personages, all trying to giggle and all wishing themselves at City Point! As to yours truly, he wasn't going to get behind trees, so long as old George G. stood out in front and took it. Ah! said Rosey, with the mild commendation of a master to a pupil: oh! you did remember what I did say. I have look at you, and you did not doge! It don't do to dodge with Hancock's Staff about; they would never forgive you. At length says the General: This i
bove the knee. W. J. Breed, Co. I, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. Isaac A. Davis, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, fracture of the leg; doing well. John Friend, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation below the knee; quite restless, shock great; will, I think, recover. Jos. Pearce, Co. E, Forty-third Ohio, amputation above the knee; very restless to-day; will recover, I think. ----Clark, Co. A, First Regular infantry, bad flesh-wounds in face, shoulder, and arm. Corporal Rosey, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, compound comminuted fracture of clavicle and scapula; serious. Wm. Peacock, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, four flesh-wounds; serious. John Johnson, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry, penetrating wound of abdomen; will likely die. ----McGown, brought into the hospital dying; lived six hours after losing a teacupful of brains. Wm. John, Co. A, First Regular U. S. infantry. All the regulars were at the guns, and injured by the one
he march. Shrewd merchants, men who were willing to take chances to earn an honest dollar, followed the army with wagons or little trucks, selling to the men every sort of publication, but especially the journals of the day. In the lower photograph is shown quite an elaborate outfit then for the sale of Philadelphia, New York, and Baltimore newspapers. Mail and newspapers at A. Of P. headquarters Letter carrier. Salesman for the Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore newspapers. Rosey to Tullahoma and then beyond the Tennessee, well-nigh starved to death in their Bragg-beleaguered camps about Chattanooga, until Hooker came to their relief and established the famous cracker line beyond reach of shot and shell. Then came long weeks in which, day by day, the freight trains, squirming slowly down that long, sinuous, single-track road from the Ohio River, reached the wide supply camps at Chattanooga, dumped their huge crates of bacon and hardtack, or the big boxes of clothi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
a foreigner, they were delighted and said, now you can tell us what the American officers really think of us. Vell, said Rosey, they no like you, they say, ven this war be over they vill take Canada. God bless me, you don't say so, they exclaimed, and did not ask Rosey any more questions of this nature. Approaching a part of the lines, where it was dangerous from sharpshooters, Rosey said they had better not go, but they pooh-poohed him, and he started on. Pretty soon the balls began to flyRosey said they had better not go, but they pooh-poohed him, and he started on. Pretty soon the balls began to fly pretty thick and close, when they changed their mind, expostulated, and finally begged Rosey to turn back, but he had his dander up and replied, No, ve vill go on, ve vill go on, and go on he did, and return, fortunately without any one being hit. Rosey to turn back, but he had his dander up and replied, No, ve vill go on, ve vill go on, and go on he did, and return, fortunately without any one being hit. To Mrs. George G. Meade: Headquarters army of the Potomac, November 20, 1864. General Grant promised me he would, when in Washington, use all his influence to have justice done to me, disclaimed any agency in Sheridan's appointment, acknowledge
ad, ana I war jest tellina the boys we'd hev ter make tracks, when the new fellers sprung the fence, ana come plumb at the secesh on a dead run. Thar warn't only thirty on 'em, yit the rebs didn't so much as make a stand, but skedaddled as ef old Rosey himself hed been arter 'em. And who were the new comers? Some on Tinker Beaty's men. They'd heerd the firina nigh two mile off, ana come up, suspicionina how things wus. But, are there Union bands there? I thought East Tennessee was oveim ter show quarter? 'Taint in natura ter do hit. All these boys hes hed jest sich, ana things like hit; ana they go in ter kill or be kilt. They doan't ax no marcy, ana they doan't show none. Nigh twenty thousand on'em is in Burnside's ana old Rosey's army, ana ye kin ax them if they doan't fight like devils. The iron has entered thar souls, sir. They feel they's doina God sarvice-ana they is-when they does fur a secesh. ana when this war ar over-ef it ever ar over --thar'll be sech a reck