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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 27 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
.-Col. George E. Tayloe; 14th Ala., Col. L. Pinckard, Lieut.-Col. James A. Broome. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Col. D. A. Weisiger; 16th Va., Col. Joseph H. Ham; 41st Va., Col. William A. Parham ; 61st Va., Col. V. D. Groner. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright, Col. William Gibson; 3d Ga., Col. E. J. Walker; 22d Ga., Col. Joseph Wasden, Capt. B. C. McCurry; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson, Capt. M. R. Hall; 2d Ga. Battn., Maj. George W. Ross, Capt. Charles J. Moffett. Perry's Brigade, Col. David Lang; 2d Fla., Maj. W. R. Moore; 5th Fla., Capt. R. N. Gardner; 8th Fla., Col. David Lang. Posey's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 16th Miss., Col. Samuel E. Baker; 19th Miss., Col. N. H. Harris; 48th Miss., Col. Joseph M. Jayne. Artillery (Sumter Battalion), Maj. John Lane; Co. A, Capt. Hugh M. Ross; Co. B, Capt. George M. Patterson; Co. C, Capt. John T. Wingfield. Heth's division, Maj.-Gen. H
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
M. W. Ranson (w), Lieut.-Col. O. C. Petway (k); 48th N. C., Col. Robert C. Hill; 49th N. C., Col. S. D. Ramseur (w). Brigade loss: k, 95; w, 453; m, 76 ==624. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Junius Daniel: 43d N. C., Col. T. S. Kenan; 45th N. C., Lieut-Col. J. H. Morehead; 50th N. C., Col. M. D. Craton; Va. Cavalry Battalion, Maj. Edgar Burroughs. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 22 == 24. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John G. Walker, Col. Van H. Manning: 3d Ark., Col. Van H. Manning; 2d Ga. Battalion, Maj. George W. Ross; 27th N. C., Col. John R. Cooke; 46th N. C., Col. E. D. Hall; 30th Va., Col. A. T. Harrison; Va. Cavalry Company, Capt. Edward A. Goodwyn. Brigade loss: w, 12. Artillery, Col. James Deshler: Va. Battery, Capt. James R. Branch; N. C. Battery, Capt. T. H. Brem; Va. Battery, Capt. David A. French; Va. Battery, Capt. Edward Graham. Artillery loss: w, 17. Wise's command (temporarily attached to Holmes's Division), Brig.-Gen. Henry A. Wise: 26th Va., Col. P. R. Page; 46th Va., Col. R.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
. Pinckard (w). Brigade loss: k, 72; w, 372; m, 91 = 535. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright: 3d Ga., Maj. J. F. Jones (w), Capt. C. H. Andrews; 22d Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. Wasden; 48th Ga., Lieut.-Col. R. W. Carswell; 2d Ga. Battalion, Maj. George W. Ross. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 271 = 296. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone: 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Lieut.-Col. E. M. Feild; 16th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. O. Whitehead; 41st Va., Col. William A. Parham; 61st Va., Col. V.ntosh: Ala. Battery (Hurt's), Va. Battery (Johnson's); Va. Battery (Lusk's); Va. Battery (Wooding's). Battalion loss (not reported). Reserve artillery, Brig.-Gen. William N. Pendleton. Sumter (Ga.) Battalion, Lieut.-Col. A. S. Cutts: Battery A (Ross's); Battery B (Patterson's); Battery C (Wingfield's). Battalion loss: w, 3. Nelson's Battalion, Lieut.-Col. William N elson: Va. Battery (Kirkpatrick's); Va. Battery (Massie's); Ga. Battery (Milledge's). Battalion loss (not reported). cavalry,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
William Mahone: 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Col. D. A. Weisiger; 16th Va., Col. Joseph H. Hamn; 41st Va., Col. William A. Parham; 61st Va., Col. V. D. Groner. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 55; m, 39-102. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright, Col. William Gibson, Brig.-Gen. Ambrose R. Wright: 3d Ga., Col. E. J. Walker; 22d Ga., Col. Joseph Wasden (k), Capt. B. C. McCurry; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson, Capt. M. R. Hall, Col. William Gibson (w and c); 2d Ga. Battalion, Maj. George W. Ross (m w), Capt. Charles J. Moffett. Brigade loss: k, 40; w, 295; m, 333 = 668. Perry's Brigade, Col. David Lang: 2d Fla., Maj. W. R. Moore (w and c); 5th Fla., Capt. R. N. Gardner (w); 8th Fla., Col. David Lang. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 217; m, 205 = 455. Posey's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Carnot Posey: 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 16th Miss., Col. Samuel E. Baker; 19th Miss., Col. N. H. Harris; 48th Miss., Col. Joseph M. Jayne. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 71 = 83. Sumpter (Ga.) Artillery Batta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
French at Morton — about nine thousand men. S. D. Lee, with four brigades of cavalry — Stark and Ross of Jackson's division and Ferguson's and Adams' brigades — covering the country from opposite Yazm the vicinity of Natchez; Ferguson was placed between Canton and Big Black, covering Loring, and Ross near the Yazoo river above Mechanicsburg. The Big Black was picketed heavily towards the railroam the direction of Vicksburg towards Mechanicsburg, on road to Yazoo City. This force was met by Ross, and defeated and driven back in numerous skirmishes from January 28th to February 5th, when theyith his two brigades, moving on his flank at Brandon and Pelahatchie stations. At the same time, Ross was ordered to abandon the Yazoo country and join his command operating against Sherman. Jacksonemphis towards Meridian. Lee put his four cavalry brigades in motion on the morning of the 18th--Ross having joined him the day before in the vicinity of Marion station. Lee's command reached Line c<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison life at Fort McHenry. (search)
be given in the following pages. On an arm of the Patapsco river, some two miles below the city of Baltimore, and guarding the entrance to its harbor, stands this old fortress, in existence as early certainly as 1794, bearing, in honor of one of the heroes of the first revolution, the name of Fort McHenry. Its chief claim to historic interest lies in the conspicuous part which it bore in the defence of Baltimore during its memorable siege by the British in the autumn of the year 1814. Ross, the British General, having completed his work of vandalism at Washington, had taken fleet with his army and entered the Patapsco, with the design of seizing the city of Baltimore and wintering there. The whole issue of the campaign, and with it, apparently, the fate of the war, depended on the capture of the city. To effect this, a passage must be forced under the guns of Fort McHenry, held at that time by the heroic Colonel Armistead with a garrison of only 1,000 men and an armament of g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
behaved in the most handsome manner — indeed, I have never seen their conduct excelled on any battlefield in this war. In the list of casualties, I am pained to find the name of Colonel Joseph Warden, commanding the Twenty-second Georgia regiment, who was killed at the head of his command near the Emmettsburg turnpike. The service contained no better or truer officer, and his death, while deeply deplored by his friends and associates, will be a serious loss to the Confederacy. Major George W. Ross, commanding Second Georgia battalion, was seriously wounded, fell into the hands of the enemy, and has since died. This gallant officer was shot down while in the enemy's works, on the crest of the heights, endeavoring to have some of the captured artillery removed. As a disciplinarian he had no superior in the field. An accomplished gentleman and gallant officer, the country will mourn his loss. Colonel William Gibson, commanding Forty-eighth Georgia regiment, was seriously wou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
. Very soon we were comfortably quartered in the neat Baptist church, receiving every manifestation of kindness and cordiality from the citizens; and from thence, a few days thereafter, we moved to the house and farm of Mr. Hill, just outside the village, where we were delightfully quartered and cared for. Everybody was kind and considerate. Among our best friends, whose memory we recall with pleasant feeling (almost a daily visitor to our camp), was the late Mr. Beckham (father of Mrs. Dr. Ross of this city), who owned a magnificent grass farm a few miles distant, and who provided hay and provender of the very sweetest and best for our steeds, besides much else to help out our comfort. While here the measles made its appearance, and a time we had of it. The education of these young men, in this especial direction, had been strangely neglected by their parents in early life; and there was enough to go round. About forty had it. One of our number, a gallant boy, son of William Mi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's operations against Smith and Grierson. (search)
eral Sherman availing himself of his cavalry in his contemplated operations. That success destroyed his campaign. Dispatches from General Lee's forces, just received, are of a very gratifying character. He has overtaken the enemy, on the west of Pearl river, in a very exhausted state, from a want of provisions and forage, and a long and hurried march, and is cutting up the rear of his column. I have hopes of destroying also some of his boats that have gone up the Yazoo towards Grenada. Ross's brigade, of Lee's division, is on the river below them, and will be reinforced, and I have another brigade above them. The result of the campaign has been thus far satisfactory, and we have not as yet seen the end of it. I shall send General Forrest, without delay, into the western district, to break up the Federal elections proposed to be held there within the next ten days, and to bring out other troops, horses, &c., from there and southern Kentucky. My report of the late operations wil
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
y has already been given. The organization of this battalion was as follows: Maj. Thomas Hardeman; Quartermaster F. S. Gross; Commissary C. S. Rogers; Adjt. W. S. Robinson; Surg. A. V. Taliaferro; Capts. C. J. Moffit (A), John F. Dupree (B), George W. Ross (C), George S. Jones (D). Major Hardeman was subsequently called to other fields of duty, and George W. Ross became major. W. F. I. Ross became captain of Company A; W. F. Walker captain of Company B on the death of Captain Dupree, and C. R.George W. Ross became major. W. F. I. Ross became captain of Company A; W. F. Walker captain of Company B on the death of Captain Dupree, and C. R. Redding, captain of Company C on the promotion of Ross. The gallant manner in which this battalion began its career was repeated on the many battlefields of the army of Northern Virginia. Faithful to every duty, it served in Wright's famous brigade (afterward Sorrel's) and surrendered at Appomattox. The Third Georgia battalion, as at first organized, had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. M. A. Stovall; Maj. A. F. Rudler; Quartermaster B. T. Jones; Capts. James D. Yeiser (A), Robert E. M
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