Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas L. Rosser or search for Thomas L. Rosser in all documents.

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rals. There is no clashing of authority, no contention. no heart-burning. Every thing moves on in the army with the most perfect accord and good feeling. Nothing additional is reported as to movements on the Potomac. Our troops are steadily fortifying their advanced positions, and extending their lines in every direction. Regiments go down daily as reliefs to those on duty in the advance, so as to distribute the hardships of the forward positions. Meanwhile the whole army is on the alert. Nothing can exceed the enthusiasm of these troops or their anxiety for battle. A few days since the balloon came over in the direction of Munson Hill, where Captain Rosser, of the Louisiana Artillery, had several rifled pieces. When about a mile off, he fired at it, without disturbing its occupants. Sighting another of his pieces with more care, he repeated the experiment with abetter result. This time the balloon disappeared earthwards with startling rapidity, and has not been seen since.
November 19. General Hampton and General Thomas L. Rosser returned to Fredericksburgh, Va., from a most successful expedition into Culpeper County. On Tuesday night last they crossed the Rapidan with detachments from Rosser's,Gordon's, and Young's brigades, all under the immediate command of General Rosser, for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the enemy on the other side. AfterGeneral Rosser, for the purpose of ascertaining the position of the enemy on the other side. After marching all night over a desperate road, they succeeded, about daylight on Wednesday morning, in locating the pickets of the enemy. That being accomplished, General Rosser immediately ordered a chaGeneral Rosser immediately ordered a charge, which was executed by his brigade in the most gallant style, driving the advance back upon the main body, which was encamped a short distance in the rear. Here the enemy had formed a line of defence; but, in defiance of a heavy fire poured into his command, General Rosser pressed forward, and soon drove the entire force (the Eighteenth Pennsylvania cavalry) through their encampment, and purs
's past have not been very numerous. On last Friday night, Captain Anderson, of the Fifty-first Indiana cavalry, (Streight's command,) Lieutenant Skelton, of the Nineteenth Iowa regiment, (a redheaded, bullet-eyed, pestilential abolitionist,) escaped from the hospital of the Libby Prison by bribing the sentinel, one Mack, a member of the Tenth Virginia battalion of heavy artillery. This person was purchased for four hundred dollars.--Richmond Examiner. This night, about eight o'clock, Rosser's brigade, of Stuart's rebel cavalry, came upon the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, from the south, near Sangster's Station, Va., and destroyed two bridges over Pope's Run.--(Doc. 115.) Authentic information having been received that Acting Masters John Y. Beall and Edward McGuire, together with fifteen men, all belonging to the confederate States navy, are now in close confinement in irons at Fort McHenry, to be tried as pirates, our efficient and energetic Agent of Exchange, Judge Oul
December 26. General Rosser returned to Orange Court-House, Va., having completed an entire circuit of the Yankee army, starting from Fredericksburgh and entering the valley at Conrad's Store. He burnt the bridge over Pope's Head Run, near Sangster's Station, just out from Alexandria, capturing and dispersing the troops left as a guard. Owing to the high water and bad weather, he was prevented from doing more damage. Gregg's Yankee cavalry pursued, but did not overtake him. General RoGeneral Rosser was forced to swim Bull Run. His loss was very slight, if any. The enemy, while in pursuit, destroyed two tanneries and a lot of leather at Sperryville, Rappahannock County; also, two tanneries, a flour-mill and some government workshops at Luray, in Page County. They also committed many other excesses, including the taking away of negroes, and shot a confederate named Smedley, at Washington, Rappahannock County, after he had surrendered.--Richmond Papers. The rebel privateer Alabama
January 1, 1864. A detachment of seventy-five men, composed of a proportionate number from each of four companies constituting Major Henry A. Cole's Maryland cavalry battalion, on a scout in the vicinity of Harper's Ferry, Maryland, were suddenly encountered, at a point near Rectortown, by a force of rebel cavalry, belonging to the brigade under the command of General Rosser. After fighting gallantly and until fifty-seven out of their number (seventy-five) were either killed or captured, the remaining eighteen made their way in safety to camp. Several of those who escaped found their feet frozen when they reached camp. Colonel William S. Hawkins, of the Hawkins scouts, a leader in the scouting service of the rebel forces under General Bragg, was captured at the house of a Mr. Mayberry, on Lick Creek, Kentucky, by Sergeant Brewer, of Major Breathitt's battalion of Kentucky cavalry.--at Memphis, Tennessee, the thermometer stood at ten degrees below zero, and at Cairo, Illin
February 3. Major-General W. T. Sherman, with the Sixteenth army corps, under the command of Major-General Hurlbut, and the Seventeenth army corps, commanded by General McPherson, left Vicksburgh upon an expedition through Mississippi.--(Doc. 122.) The guard of one company of infantry posted at Patterson Creek Bridge, eight miles east of Cumberland, Va., was attacked at half-past 1 P. M. yesterday, by five hundred rebel cavalry, under General Rosser, and after a spirited resistance, in which two were killed and ten wounded, the greater part of the company were captured. This accomplished, the rebels set fire to the bridge, and leaving it to destruction, started off with their prisoners in the direction of Romney. The employes of the railroad succeeded in staying the fire, and saved the bridge, with only slight damage. General Averill, with his command of nearly two thousand cavalry, and who had been sent out from Martinsburgh by General Kelley, this morning overtook the