hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 95 15 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 68 18 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 58 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 41 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 26 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 22 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 7 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 11 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Rousseau or search for Rousseau in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
o the cause of the South, instead of protesting against such violence, solicited authority to break up all assemblages of Union troops. But the two chambers answered him on the 12th by requesting the Federal government to protect Kentucky against the invaders, and by conferring the command of the home-guards upon General Anderson. That officer immediately took up his quarters at Louisville, to organize the militia assembled at Camp Joe Holt, in the neighborhood of that city, and which General Rousseau had already begun to drill. The conflict had commenced in Kentucky. One of the chiefs of the secession party, Mr. Morehead, was arrested in Louisville and sent to Fort Lafayette; the rest took refuge with the Confederate armies. Among them might be seen Mr. Breckinridge, Vice-President of the republic under Mr. Buchanan, a skilful and bold politician, but who, under the Confederate uniform, made but a poor general; Humphrey Marshall, the brilliant cavalry colonel of the Mexican war; f
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
. As soon as it was sufficiently light to attack the enemy Crittenden was to take position on Nelson's right. McCook, who followed them with his first brigade, Rousseau's, the only one yet landed, was ordered to make a similar movement immediately after. He would thus connect Buell's line with L. Wallace's division, which was top, and takes position alongside of it, but is soon charged by the enemy, and barely escapes by a speedy retreat. During this time the efforts of Crittenden and Rousseau to break the enemy's centre have been frustrated by a wood from which they have been unable to dislodge it. In pursuance of the plan agreed upon between the te point, sometimes at another. The last brigades of McCook's division, which have just landed, arrive during the battle, and take position between the right of Rousseau, who commands the first brigade, and the left of L. Wallace; but they cannot entirely fill up the space which remains open between the latter division and the ar