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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
, 330, 332, 333, 353, 356, 357, 359, 363. Ringgold Station, 257. Ripley, George, 17, 26, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35-37, 39, 44, 45, 48, 49, 51, 153, 158, 176, 453, 454. Roberts, Marshall O., 401. Robeson, George M., 411, 424, 433. Robespierre, 68, 69. Robinson, General, 373. Rockville, 336. Rocky Springs, 221. Rodenbough, Captain, 352. Rolling Fork Bayou, 207. Roosevelt, President, 103. Rosecrans, General, 232-234, 236, 253-258, 260, 262-268, 271-278, 339. Rossville, 191. Rousseau, General, 270. Roxbury, 37. Russia, 82. Rust, Senator, 144, 145. S. Sackville-West, Sir Lionel, 475. Safe Burglary Conspiracy, 434,435, 441, 442, 493. St. Thomas Island, 402. Sale of arms to France, 425. Sallust, 56. Santo Domingo, 402, 419,420,422, 435. Satartia, trip to, 231, 232. Savannah, 352, 353, 355. Scates, Judge, 253. Schiller, 56. Schofield, General, 353, 354, 356, 406, 410, 411. Schurz, Carl, 36, 296, 431. Scituate, Massachusetts, 13, 15, 25, 27
pected attacks. The whole force of the enemy was concentrated on and near the direct road on. the west of Stone River. Crittenden's corps formed the left of the line, Thomas the centre, of which Negley's division was drawn up in advance, and Rousseau's in reserve, and McCook's corps the right. The road and the river divided both armies into two wings. The ground was favourable to manoeuvre-large open fields, densely wooded tracts of cedar and thinner ones of oak; the gentle swells of the land not less than five thousand prisoners; and it was in such circumstances that he was to prepare a new disposition of his forces, and impart a new inspiration to dispute what remained of the day. A new line of battle was rapidly developed. Rousseau's division was hurried forward from the centre, and Crittenden was ordered to abandon all idea of an advance, and to march as quickly as possible two out of his three divisions to support the right wing. These movements were masked by immense c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
llins, and Shaftesbury. At various periods of his life he drew up articles of belief, which generally included recognition of one God, the providential government of the world, the immortality of the soul, and divine justice. To profess faith in as much religion as this he found emotionally gratifying, socially expedient, and conformable to the common sense of mankind. He would have subscribed without hesitation to both the positive and negative dogmas of the religion civil formulated by Rousseau in the Contrat social. In his later years he was in sympathetic relations with Paine, Price, and Priestley. He was, however, of a fortunately earlier generation than these English heretics, and certain other circumstances enabled him to keep the temper of his heterodoxy sweet while theirs grew acidulous, and to walk serenely in ways which for them were embittered by the odium theologicum. His earlier advent upon the eighteenth-century scene made possible the unfolding and comfortable sett
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: colonial newspapers and magazines, 1704-1775 (search)
riginal. This expression natural rights, occurring so early as 1755 in Livingston's paper, is probably accidental or vague, but the full political theory of Rousseau, with all its abstractions regarding mankind in general, was soon added to the definite and always cherished belief in the constitutional privileges of Englishmester Notions of Civil Liberty than some among ourselves. This was in the days when Gallic perfidy was the popular note. After 1760 all the important works of Rousseau, Montesquieu, and the Encyclopedists as well as many other French books were advertised for sale in the colonial press. Such advertisements indicate the taste oe reading public more accurately than do catalogues of private libraries, which represent individual preferences. Voltaire had long been known in the colonies. Rousseau's Social Contract was advertised as a Treatise on the social compact, or the principles of political law. He himself is referred to again and again as the ingen
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
ment upon the sentimental treatment of external nature in Rousseau, and upon his conception, in part derived from early Amerh seems rather to have come from the travellers than from Rousseau, but possibly is dormant in almost every educated mind, iengeful and impure. Montaigne, indeed, a predecessor of Rousseau in admiring the unlettered aborigines, had held that the f Chamfort, presented at the Theatre Francais in 1764, or Rousseau's Chanson des Sauvages and Danse Canadienne; on the othereas should cast a spell over minds so diverse as those of Rousseau, Goethe, Wordsworth, and the Quaker Bartram. The suggestg from Caen in 1781. Through the Countess de Houdetot of Rousseau's Confessions he was enabled to send a copy of his book ttaigne's high-minded savage, and belongs to the family of Rousseau's natural man; whereas the base Mingoes are more like rea and then tells of his vain search for the natural man of Rousseau. He found little more to please him than the Muckawiss,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
r fundamentally altered. On leaving Harvard he acted for nearly two years as tutor in a Virginia family, imbibing in the course of this experience an intense hatred of slavery. During this period, too, he became acquainted with the works of Rousseau, Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft, and from that time the kinship of many of his ideas with those of French Revolutionary origin can be clearly traced, though in passing through his serene and profoundly Christian mind those ideas often became scif not its particular source, at least its general European kinship. When Emerson in the opening pages of Nature exhorts his countrymen to come forth and live their own lives, reminding them that the sun shines to-day also, we catch echoes of Rousseau's Man is born free; and is everywhere in chains. When Thoreau proclaims an intention to brag as lustily as chanticleer in the morning, standing on his roost, if only to wake my neighbours up, we feel that here is the homely New England version
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
0 Commonplace Book, 57 Common sense, 120, 141 Common sense in Dishabille, 236 Companions of Columbus, 249 Compensation, 336, 352 Complaint of a Forsaken Indian woman, the, 213 Condorcet, 91 Conduct of life, 359 Confessions (Rousseau), 199 Confidence man, the, 323 Conflagration, the, 160 Congress Canvassed, the, 136 Congreve, 116 Conner, Charlotte Barnes, 223, 224, 225 Conquest of Canaan, the, 165-166 Conquest of Canada, the, 217 Conquest of Granada, the,, 227 Robinson Crusoe, 284, 302 Rogers, Major, Robert, 217 Rogers, Samuel, 243, 255, 265 Rolfe, John, 225 Rolliad, the, 171, 174 Romeo and Juliet, 265 Roscoe, William, 255 Rose, Aquila, 161 Rose of Aragon, 231 Rosemary, 263 Rousseau, 102, 119, 187, 188, 199, 208, 213, 331, 346 Rowe, 116 Rowlandson, Mrs., Mary, 6, 7 Rowson, Mrs., Susanna, 179, 226, 285, 286 Royal America magazine, the, 123 Rules by which a great Empire may be reduced to a small one, 98, 140
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 19 (search)
. If time served, I could find a score of familiar instances. It is enough to state the general principle, that civilization produces wants. Wants awaken intellect. To gratify them disciplines intellect. The keener the want, the lustier the growth. The power to use new truths in science, new ideas in morals or art, obliterates rank, and makes the lowest man useful or necessary to the state. Popes and kings no longer mark the ages; but Luther and Raphael, Fulton and Faust, Howard and Rousseau. A Massachusetts mechanic, Eli Whitney, made cotton king; a Massachusetts printer, William Lloyd Garrison, has undermined its throne. Thus civilization insures equality. Types are the fathers of democrats. It is not always, however, ideas or moral principles that push the world forward. Selfish interests play a large part in the work. Our Revolution of 1776 succeeded because trade and wealth joined hands with principle and enthusiasm,--a union rare in the history of revolutions. No
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
ril, on his way to Philadelphia, he visited her for the first time as an acknowledged suitor, and, to his great satisfaction, was received by her in her customary simplicity of dress. Truly, he writes. not Ms. April 24, 1834. one young lady out of ten thousand, in a first interview with her lover, but would have endeavored falsely to heighten her charms and allure by outwardattractions. Premierement ta parure, car tu n'en avais point, et tu sais bien que jamais tu n'es si dangereuse (Rousseau, Nouvelle Helise ). Deep and genuine affection, modesty and self-respect determined her behavior on this and on every other occasion. The short hours spent together in rambles up the romantic Gray Mare hill which overhangs the little valley, or in the privacy of evening, or in the common intercourse of the amiable household, confirmed them in the wisdom and sacredness of their new relation. Other interviews, on Mr. Garrison's return to Boston (in May) and again in July, pleasantly interru
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
. . . I sincerely hope the difficulty will be healed, if it can be, without yielding principle. Mr. Tappan's letter to the Recorder, which was eagerly copied by pro-slavery papers, expressed the hope that the Lib. 5.27. Union and the anti-slavery societies could work in harmony, as he believed there already existed a substantial agreement in principle. He defended Mr. Garrison against the charge of atheism; Preferred by the Recorder, which absurdly ranked Mr. Garrison with Paine, Rousseau, and the French Jacobins (Lib. 5.3). said his friends were not insensible of his faults, of which the most prominent is the severe and denunciatory language with which he often assails his opponents and repels their attacks, but hoped to see this corrected, and that argument will take the place of invective; and declared that much was due him for his noble and disinterested efforts. Mr. Garrison replied by denying that the leading Lib. 5.19. anti-slavery men were in sympathy or connec
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