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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. 1 1 Browse Search
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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
. Captain John Smith. Newfoundland. William Vaughn. Robert Hayman. Robert Sedgwick. pamphlets of the land companies. narratives of Indian captivities. Mrs. Rowlandson. John Gyles. Jonathan Dickinson. the Quakers. Alice Curwen. George Keith. Sarah Knight. William Byrd. Dr. Alexander Hamilton The English folk who bs, and the stream of successive reprintings is still going on, to supply an unabated demand. The first and the best known of these narratives is that of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson. She was the wife of the minister at Lancaster, Massachusetts, where the natives seized her when they burned the town during King Philip's War. The recorddition, bespeaking Compassion, and I had no refreshing for it, nor suitable things to revive it. @1 2d ed. 1682. The date of the first edition is unknown. Mrs. Rowlandson's narrative is matched by that of John Gyles of Pemaquid (1736), who collected from his minutes these private Memoirs, at the earnest Request of my Second
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
evillette, 317 Rob of the bowl, 311 Robbins, Abigail, 192 Robert of Lincoln, 272 Robertson, William, 29, 91, 97 Robespierre, 91 Robin, Abb6, 212 Robinson, J., 227 Robinson Crusoe, 284, 302 Rogers, Major, Robert, 217 Rogers, Samuel, 243, 255, 265 Rolfe, John, 225 Rolliad, the, 171, 174 Romeo and Juliet, 265 Roscoe, William, 255 Rose, Aquila, 161 Rose of Aragon, 231 Rosemary, 263 Rousseau, 102, 119, 187, 188, 199, 208, 213, 331, 346 Rowe, 116 Rowlandson, Mrs., Mary, 6, 7 Rowson, Mrs., Susanna, 179, 226, 285, 286 Royal America magazine, the, 123 Rules by which a great Empire may be reduced to a small one, 98, 140 Ruling passion, the, 179 Rural poems, 163 Rural Wanderer, the, 234 Rush, Benjamin, 91 Ruth, 183, 197, 213 Ryan's Company, 218 S St. Asaph, Bishop of, 103 St. Augustine, 59 St. Francis, 104 Salmagundi, 233, 238-239, 240, 247, 311 Sands, 240 Sandys, Edward, 18 Saratoga springs, 229 Sargent,
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 2: the first colonial literature (search)
n John Mason, who led in the storming and slaughter at the Indians' Mystic Fort, are as piously relentless as anything in the Old Testament. Cromwell at Drogheda, not long after, had soldiers no more merciless than these exterminating Puritans, who wished to plough their fields henceforth in peace. A generation later the storm broke again in King Philip's War. Its tales of massacre, captivity, and single-handed fighting linger in the American imagination still. Typical pamphlets are Mary Rowlandson's thrilling tale of the Lancaster massacre and her subsequent captivity, and the loud-voiced Captain Church's unvarnished description of King Philip's death. The King, shot down like a wearied bull-moose in the deep swamp, fell upon his face in the mud and water, with his gun under him. They drew him through the mud to the upland; and a doleful, great, naked dirty beast he looked like. The head brought only thirty shillings at Plymouth: scanty reward and poor encouragement, thought C
Ren, ChAteaubriand 96 Repplier, Agnes, 262 Revolution, influence upon literature, 66 et seq.; bibliography, 270 Rights of man, the, Paine 75 Riley, J. W., 247, 257-59 Ripley, George, 141 Rise of Silas Lapham, the, Howells 251 Rise of the Dutch Republic, Motley 180 Rivulet, the, Bryant 106 Robinson, John, 11 Roderick Hudson, James 253 Rolfe, John, 38 Romanticism in American literature, 187 et seq. Roosevelt, Theodore, 243 Roughing it, Clemens 10, 237 Rowlandson, Mary, 39 Rules for Reducing a great Empire to a Small one, Franklin 58 Russell, Irwin, 246 Salem witchcraft, 43 Salmagundi papers, Irving and Paulding 91 Sanborn, F. B., 142 Sandys, George, 27 Scarlet letter, the, Hawthorne 7, 30, 145, 146, 148, 149-50 School-days, Whittier 158 Scott, Sir, Walter, 95 Scribner's monthly, 256 Scudder, Horace, 169 Seaweed, Longfellow 156 Sewell, Samuel, Judge, 47-48 Shepard, Thomas, 16, 31-32 Short story, the, 261-62 Sill,
Weymouth, Groton, Marlborough —were laid in ashes. No where was there more distress than at Lancaster. Forty-two persons sought shelter under the roof of Mary Rowlandson; and, after a hot assault, the Indians succeeded in setting the house on fire. Will the mothers of the United States, happy in the midst of unexampled prosperity, know the sorrows of woman in a former generation? Quickly, writes Mary Rowlandson, it was the dolefulest day that ever mine eyes saw. Now the dreadful hour is come. Some in our house were fighting for their lives; others wallowing in blood; the house on fire over our heads, and the bloody heathen ready to knock us on the hed, would come and tell me, Your master will quickly knock your child on the head. This was the comfort I had from them; miserable comforters were they all. M. Rowlandson's Narrative. 12—25 Nor were such scenes of ruin confined to Massachusetts. At the south, the whole Narragansett country was deserted by the English. War
f information. Mr. Elisha B. Curtis and others gave personal reminiscences on the subject, and also of the Medford family noted for their skill in ringing bells and entertaining exhibitions of the same. May 18 Charles Edward Mann, President of the Malden Historical Society, gave an informal talk on Sam Walter Foss as he knew him in early life, when both were beginning on journalistic careers and undertaking literary work. This interchange of courtesies with our neighbors is a happy phrase of our work. Mrs. Augusta A. Brigham, now of Malden, formerly of Medford, a member of this Society, gave a paper before the New England Historic Genealogical Society this season, and she acquitted herself so creditably that we feel honored by the work she has done. Her subject was The Massacre at Lancaster, the story of the captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson. At each meeting of the Bay State Historical League one or more of our members have served as delegates. Eliza M. Gill, Secretary.