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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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entucky cavalry, under Major Gratz, a squadron of the Ninth Kentucky cavalry, under command of Major Rue, the Twelfth Kentucky infantry, the Sixteenth Kentucky infantry, (which two regiments, togethehen encamped two miles to our right on the Rolling Fork. A halt of the column was ordered. Major Rue, of the Ninth Kentucky cavalry, was ordered forward to guard the bridge over Rolling Fork. A Muldrow's Hill. I also ordered a reconnoissance of their position, which duty was assigned to Major Rue, his men being familiar with the locality in which they were said to be camped. I ordered the believing that the enemy would halt there to feed and rest his stock, I ordered Majors Gratz and Rue, with one section of artillery, to press forward, hoping to prevent, by rapid pursuit, the destruthanks are due to Lieut.-Col. Gantt and Major Harbeson, of the Sixteenth Kentucky, Majors Farris, Rue, and Fidler, of the cavalry, and Dr. S. M. Cartmell, Medical Director of the Expedition; nor shou
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
-a set-off to the one false Conservative. Other Negroes are said to be spending their dollars and getting drunk. Kellogg perceives that he must act. Sending out for carpenters and innkeepers, he orders them to convert the State House into a fortress and hotel. A vast and handsome edifice, standing at the angle of St. Louis Street and Royal Street, this State House was originally built for an hotel, and called, after the royal founder of Louisiana, the Hotel St. Louis. Rue Royale and Rue St. Louis cut and cross the old French quarter. This side of New Orleans is quaint with balconies, green shutters, high gateways, and inner yards, tricked out with squirts of water and pots of oleander, doing duty for fountains and gardens; a decrepit and deserted corner of the town, from which the tides of life and trade have long since ebbed away. The stench reminds you of Dieppe, the dominoes and billiards of Bayonne. Yet this French quarter used to be a fashionable lounge, where ladies
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
le for critics (1848); and Poems (1848). He became professor of modern languages at Harvard, was the first editor of the Atlantic Mlonthly, and was joint editor with Professor Norton of the North American Review. Fireside travels appeared in 1864; a second series of Biglow papers (1866); Under the Willows (1869); Among my books (1870); and My study Windows (1871). He was minister to Spain, and later was transferred to England. Democracy and other addresses was issued in 1887; Heartsease and Rue (1888); and Political essays (1888). He died in Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 12, 1891. Mather, Cotton Born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 12, 1663. Graduating from Harvard in 1678, he studied theology and became minister of the North Church in Boston. He was one of the leaders in the movement against witchcraft, and in justification of his attitude wrote The Wonders of the invisible world (1692). He also published, among many volumes, Memorable Providences relating to witchcraft And possessions (1
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 24: Lowell (search)
After his retirement in 1885 he spent a considerable part of his time in England until his death in 1891. The mission was a recognition of his distinction not merely as a man of letters but as a representative of the best American culture, and this distinction Lowell maintained in a number of addresses on both literary and political themes, represented by the volume Democracy and other addresses (1886). Although his poetry became infrequent there was enough for annual volume, Heartsease and Rue, in 1880. To all these varied activities as poet, essayist, humorist, editor, teacher, scholar, and diplomat, must be added that of letter writer. For Lowell's letters, in addition to their annals of his personal experiences and friendships, contribute something to literature and history which perhaps has ceased with the day of the typewriter—a record of the intimate association of the high-minded. His work as a man of letters may be considered most readily by the main divisions of vers
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Hawthorne (Hathorne), John, 21 Hawthorne (Hathorne), Nathaniel, 16-31, 33, 38, 63, 64, 67, 165, 168, 173, 202, 232, 249, 362, 369, 369 n., 370, 371, 373, 377, 383, 384, 387, 388, 401, 406, 408 Hayne, Paul Hamilton, 93 n., 288, 291, 292-293, 298, 301, 302, 303, 306, 307, 308, 311, 335, 336, 342 Hayne, Robert Y., 85 Hazard, Ebenezer, 106, 107, 113-114, 115 Hazlitt, William, 206, 258 Health, a, 289 Hearne (directory), 264 n. Heart of the War, the, 280 Heartsease and Rue, 247 Heeren, A. H. L., 112 Hegel, 209, 212, 213 Heidelberg, 34 Heine, 243 von Held, Toni, 357 n. Hemans, Mrs., 398 Henneman, John Bell, 318 Henty, G. A., 404 Herald (N. Y.), 155, 186, 187, 193, 194, 272, 321, 331 Her letter, 242 Herrick, Robert, 243 Het voorspel van den tachtigjarigen oorlog, 139 Heywood, John, 125 Hiawatha, 38, 39, 156 Hibbard, G. A., 388 Higginson, Colonel T. W., 36, 49, 401 Higher and the lower good, the, 220 High tide, 284 Hildreth
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
panion. Jan. 20 (Saturday). Waked in the full determination with which I went to sleep; namely, to find a warmer place for my body. In America I am accustomed to cold weather; but there I find a comfortable shelter from its inclemency. My present quarters do not afford it. With a large fire in front and my surtout on, I freeze behind; and my hair is so cold that I hesitate to touch it with my hand. Of course, I cannot endure this; and I have taken neat and comfortable quarters at No. 25 Rue de l'odeon, where Shattuck and Benjamin are, at the rate of sixty francs a month. To-day I heard at the Sorbonne the substitute of Cousin, M. Poret, a gentleman very plain in his appearance, who appeared to be about forty-five. His lecture was written,—the first written one I have heard,—and he seemed to be so little acquainted with its text, and was so near-sighted, that he was obliged to stoop his head constantly in order to read it. It was on the philosophical theory of Heraclitus. I
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), Messrs. Roberts Brothers' Publications. (search)
ed, post-paid, by the Publishers, Roberts Brothers, Boston. No name (second) series: baby Rue. One peculiar charm of the No Name novels is that they are really light reading, in the be means of relaxation to over-taxed brains, and as helps to the rest of over-worked bodies. Baby Rue is just a book of this sort. It is cleverly written, and deals with characters and events alwaycruel, and that nobility of character is not confined wholly to the white race. All in all, Baby Rue is a notable book, and one that will have more than a momentary popularity; full of vivid descrip who can read without moist eyes, how the young officer stooped to kiss the footprint of his Baby Rue, and offered a hundred dollars to the man who would carry it intact to the child's mother at the author may display. Having these ideas in mind, we have found genuine pleasure in reading Baby Rue, the latest addition to the No Name Series. . . . The descriptive passages are done with a facil