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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
hine, whose strength increased with pressure upon it, but it was good enough for our purpose. While the work was going on Stuart was lying down on the bank of the river in the gayest humor I ever saw. He did not seemed oppressed with any care. During the night I had foraged among the sutlers and brought off a lot of their stores. Out of these I spread a feast. While we were waiting for the bridge no enemy appeared. At last, about 2 o'clock, when all had passed over, and the bridge fired, Rush's lancers came up on a hill and took a look at us as we disappeared from view. General Emory received news of the crossing eight miles off, at Baltimore Store. The feat has no parallel. In his report of what he did not do, he says the Confederates crossed at daylight, and left faster than they came. There is no evidence either of haste in Stuart's march or in Emory's pursuit of him. About 1 P. M. on the 13th, Royall's camp at Old Church was captured; about sunset we reached Tunstall's
es of Richmond. Adverting to his insigulas of office, the General, in casual conversation, spoke of his equipments. "This bridle," said he, boorishly, "was made in England and sent to me from friends across the water. My saddle was shipped by underground from a Rebel woman of Baltimore. We will make all these things ourselves after a while." Referring to our cavalry, General Stuart said that Virginia had the best cavalry in the world, as her men were born riders. He complimented Rush's Lancers, of our service, and the 5th regular cavalry--the latter for a heroic charge at Galnen's Mill. He and Gen. Hartauff had been old schoolmates, and accosted each other rather embarrassedly--"How are you, Hartsuff!" Stuart, how do you do?" They rode off directly together to revive old times. These Confederates claim to have seven regiments of Marylanders in their service. They have, however, but three regiments from Tennessee--They claim for their conscript regiments the very be
Her features were not very regular, and she was not very ill, but her eyes were so bright and color and her figure so elastic and her abundant hair, and above all, her they manners, and the expression of sunny good temper and perfect openness lighting up her face, made most people consider her a very attractive woman. Forever one in the parish liked her, from the two old people, who eat near the above in church and always came round to get their dinner at the parsonage on Sunday, to Mrs. Dr. Rush, who was by far the grandest lady in the parish. Mr. and Mrs. Ashton had been married about six months, after an engagement of almost three years, during which time they had corresponded vigorously, but had seen very little of each other, for Mr. Ashton was an assistant in an overgrown parish in one of our larger cities, and could seldom be spared; and Chrissy was a teacher in another great city, where she supported herself and helped by her labors to educate one of her brothers for th
directly towards Gettysburg, but having passed the Blue Ridge, turned back towards Hagerstown for six or eight miles, an I then crossed to Maryland by Emmettsburg, where, as we passed, we were called by the inhabitants with the most enthusiastic demonstrations of joy. A scouting party of 150 lancers had just passed towards Gettysburg, and I regret exceedingly that my march did not admit of the delay necessary to catch them. Taking the road towards Frederick, we intercepted dispatches from Col. Rush (lancers) to the commander of the scout, which satisfied in that our where-about, was still a problem to the enemy. Before reaching Frederick, I caressed the Monocracy, continued the march through the night, via Liberty, New Market, Monrovia on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we out the telegraph wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight. Hyatistown, on McClellan's line of wagon communication with Washington, but we found only a few wagons to capture and pushe
in death laid low, showed how the cry of "Remember Fort Pillow!" was responded to by our Spartan braves. The rent made in the earth by the explosion is one of the most ghastly, unsightly objects I have ever witnessed. The ground is torn as if by an earthquake, and great boulders of earth are scattered here and there, with ever and anon the mangled form of some lifeless Confederate protruded beyond. Among the brave in battle slain are the gallant Colonel Evans, 64th Georgia, and Captain Rush, commanding 22d Georgia regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Williamson, 4th Virginia, had his arm resected, and Major Woodhouse was severely wounded.--Captain Broadbout, commanding sharpshooters, Mahone's brigade, and Captain McCrea, commanding 3d Georgia, were also wounded. The following is a list of the battle flags captured: Four large United States flags; one battle tattered flag belonging to 11th N. H. V., and inscribed "Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson;" another marked.--regiment in
in death laid low, showed how the cry of "Remember Fort Pillow!" was responded to by our Spartan braves. The rent made in the earth by the explosion is one of the most ghastly, unsightly objects I have ever witnessed. The ground is torn as if by an earthquake, and great boulders of earth are scattered here and there, with ever and anon the mangled form of some lifeless Confederate protruded beyond. Among the brave in battle slain are the gallant Colonel Evans, 64th Georgia, and Captain Rush, commanding 22d Georgia regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel Williamson, 4th Virginia, had his arm resected, and Major Woodhouse was severely wounded.--Captain Broadbout, commanding sharpshooters, Mahone's brigade, and Captain McCrea, commanding 3d Georgia, were also wounded. The following is a list of the battle flags captured: Four large United States flags; one battle tattered flag belonging to 11th N. H. V., and inscribed "Fredericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson;" another marked.--regiment in
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