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The Daily Dispatch: October 15, 1863., [Electronic resource], The dismissal of the British Consuls — official correspondence. (search)
angements could be made for correspondence between agents appointed by Her Majesty's Government, to reside in the Confederate States, and the authorities of such States. I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient, humble servant, (Signed) Russell. Mr. Mason to Earl Russell.24 Upper Seymour street, Portman Square, September 4, 1863. The Rt. Hon. Earl Russell, Her Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs: My Lord --I have had the honor to receive your Lordship's letteHon. Earl Russell, Her Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs: My Lord --I have had the honor to receive your Lordship's letter of the 19th August, ultimo, in reply to mine of the 24th and 29th July, ultimo. I shall transmit a copy of your Lordship's letter to the Secretary of State at Richmond. These dispatches of Mr. Benjamin, full copies of which I have by his direction furnished to your Lordship, certainly evince no disinclination to permit any persons accredited by Her Majesty's Government as its Consular or other agents to reside within the Confederate States, and as such to be in communication with the Go
Russell's late speech. --We published yesterday a sketch of the speech of Lord Russell at Blair Gourie, in Scotland. Let us take "a woodpeckers tap at this hollow beech tree." "He replied," so the report says, "to the complaints of the South in regard to the recognition of the blockade, and asserted that although self-ild be infamous to break it." Now, by the treaty of Paris, a blockade, to be respected, must be effectual. That this blockade has not been effectual, according to Russell's own interpretation, is evident enough. If the treaty had been followed out, the blockade would have been broken long since. If there be any infamy in the mattspeak, and he is obeyed; but to hold up his finger, and remonstrance dies away upon the lips of any one bold enough to differ from him. Upon only one occasion has Russell dared to maintain the honor of his country, and then he found it impossible to resist the current of popular opinion. He is the firm and loyal ally of the Northe