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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Incidents of the occupation of New Orleans. (search)
wn, he remaining on the top floor at the foot of the ladder. An ordinary ladder led to the roof, through a small covered hatchway. The boatswain's mate ascended first, shoved the hatch cover to one side, and gained the roof. I followed him, and finding the halliards knotted, I drew my sword and cut them; we then hauled the flag down, Captain Bell in his diary says that when he offered to Lieutenant Kautz the privilege of hauling down the flag the latter waived the offer in favor of George Russell, boatswain's mate of the Hartford, to whom the honor had been promised.--Editors. took it to the floor below and handed it to Captain Bell, who on our return to the Scene at the City Hall — hauling down the State flag. The local papers spoke of the State flag on the City I-all at the time as the Lone Star flag. General Beauregard, in a letter to Admiral Preble, in 1872, says this flag was adopted in 1861 by the State Convention of Louisiana. It had thirteen stripes, four blue, si
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
ging solemn thoughts of the uncertainty of life, and sorrow for such misuse of its great gifts and opportunities as I am well conscious of. This has been a good year to me. It carried me to the Pacific slope, and showed me indeed a land of promise. It gave me an unexpected joy in the harmonious feelings toward me and the members of A. A.W. at the Detroit Congress. It has, alas! taken from me my dear pastor, most precious to me for help and instruction, and other dear and valued friends, notably Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life when God so wills. . .
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ndment must have positive ground. I wrote some lines in which a bit of sea-weed shining in the sun seemed as an illustration of the light which I hope to gain. September 30. A performance of Jarley's Waxworks in the evening was much enjoyed. Edward Atkinson as Mrs. Partington in my witch hat recited some merry nonsense of Hood's about European travel. October 2. Boston. In the early morning John M. Forbes's yacht, the Wild Duck, hovered around us, hoping to take off his daughter, Mrs. Russell.... Quite a number of us embraced this opportunity with gratitude.... October 3. All seems like a dream. October 7. Newport. I begin my life here with a prayer that the prolongation of my days on earth may be for good to myself and others, that I may not sink into senile folly or grossness, nor yet wander into aesthetic conceit, but carry the weight of my experience in humility, in all charity, and in a loving and serviceable spirit. The last entry in the Journal for 1892 strik
, 235, 237, 238. Roosevelt, Theodore, II, 191, 303-05, 325, 328, 388. Rose, Mme., II, 241. Rosebery, A. P. Primrose, Earl of, II, 7. Rosmini, Serbati, II, 176. Ross, Christian, II, 243. Rossetti, D. G., II, 239, 248. Rossini, G. A., II, 104. Rothschild, Lady, II, 168. Round Hill School, I, 46. Rousseau, Jacques, II, 172. Royal Geographic Society, II, 5, 7. Rubens, P. P., I, 279; II, 11, 173. Rubenstein, Anton, I, 346. Russell, C. H., II, 220. Russell, George, II, 141. Russell, Sarah S., II, 141. Russia, I, 207; II, 187, 218. Russian Freedom, Friends of, II, 187, 330. Rutherford, Louis, I, 49. Sabatier, Paul, II, 253. Sacken, Baron, Osten, I, 256. St. Anthony, Falls of, I, 379. St. Anthony of Padua, II, 275. St. Bartholomew's Hospital, II, 8. St. George, Knights of, I, 74. St. Jerome, tomb of, II, 38. St. Lawrence River, I, 5. St. Louis, I, 169, 170. St. Paul, I, 185, 224, 289, 366; II, 157, 231, 383
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), V. Conversations in Boston. (search)
ary Channing, Miss Sarah Clarke, Mrs. E. P. Clark, Miss Dorr, Mrs. Edwards, Mrs. R. W. Emerson, Mrs. Farrar, Miss S. J. Gardiner, Mrs. R. W. Hooper, Mrs. S. Hooper, Miss Haliburton, Miss Howes, Miss E. Hoar, Miss Marianne Jackson, Mrs. T. Lee, Miss Littlehale, Mrs. E. G. Loring, Mrs. Mack, Mrs. Horace Mann, Mrs. Newcomb, Mrs. Theodore Parker, Miss E. P. Peabody, Miss S. Peabody, Mrs. S. Putnam, Mrs. Phillips, Mrs. Josiah Quincy, Miss B. Randall, Mrs. Samuel Ripley, Mrs. George Ripley, Mrs. George Russell, Miss Ida Russell, Mrs. Frank Shaw, Miss Anna B. Shaw, Miss Caroline Sturgis, Miss Tuckerman, Miss Maria White, Mrs. S. G. Ward, Miss Mary Ward, Mrs. W. Whiting. In this company of matrons and maids, many tender spirits had been set in ferment. A new day had dawned for them; new thoughts had opened; the secret of life was shown, or, at least, that life had a secret. They could not forget what they had heard, and what they had been surprised into saying. A true refinement had begun
nd, Shadrach15 Israel Putnam and Bunker Hill85 Israel Putnam and Prospect Hill85 Jackson, George Russell6 Jaques, Samuel53, 55 Jennor (Jenner), Elizabeth62 John Abbot Lodge101 Kemble, Miss4 Keorace44 Runey, James S.45 Runey, John44, 45 Runey, John, House of44 Runey, Mrs. Maria M.45 Russell, Daniel60 Russell, Frank45 Russell, James, Recorder36 Russell, Thomas53 Rymes, Christopher Russell, Frank45 Russell, James, Recorder36 Russell, Thomas53 Rymes, Christopher E.22 Saint Lawrence River49, 52 Salem, Mass.40 Sanborn, David, House of47 Sanborn, David, Jr., House of47 Sanborn, Mrs. David47 Sandwich, England16 Sanitary Commission, The103 Saratoga86 SarRussell, James, Recorder36 Russell, Thomas53 Rymes, Christopher E.22 Saint Lawrence River49, 52 Salem, Mass.40 Sanborn, David, House of47 Sanborn, David, Jr., House of47 Sanborn, Mrs. David47 Sandwich, England16 Sanitary Commission, The103 Saratoga86 Sargent Ave., Somerville44 Sawyer, Mrs. Caroline M.27 Sawyer, Mrs. Caroline M., Poems of27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Sawyer, Dr. T. J.27 Scammans, Col.94 School Near Reading, First Outside ‘The Peninsula’64 Russell, Thomas53 Rymes, Christopher E.22 Saint Lawrence River49, 52 Salem, Mass.40 Sanborn, David, House of47 Sanborn, David, Jr., House of47 Sanborn, Mrs. David47 Sandwich, England16 Sanitary Commission, The103 Saratoga86 Sargent Ave., Somerville44 Sawyer, Mrs. Caroline M.27 Sawyer, Mrs. Caroline M., Poems of27, 28, 29, 30, 31 Sawyer, Dr. T. J.27 Scammans, Col.94 School Near Reading, First Outside ‘The Peninsula’64 School, First, Charlestown15 School Fund, Charlestown, Beginnings of17 Schoolhouse, Town Hill, Description of64 School Street, Boston13 School Street, Somerville44 Scituate, Second Parish of16
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], Mr. Russell's second letter on the Manassas rout — an editorial from the London Times. (search)
Mr. Russell's second letter on the Manassas rout — an editorial from the London Times. We subjoin a few extracts from Mr. Russell's second letter, dated Washington, July 24th, 1861: Lincoln's Cabinet. In the States one thing is certain — the Cabinet will resist the pressure of the mob or be hurled out of office. If they yield to the fanatics and fight battles against the advice of their officers, they must be beaten, and the tone of New York indicates that a second defeat would cMr. Russell's second letter, dated Washington, July 24th, 1861: Lincoln's Cabinet. In the States one thing is certain — the Cabinet will resist the pressure of the mob or be hurled out of office. If they yield to the fanatics and fight battles against the advice of their officers, they must be beaten, and the tone of New York indicates that a second defeat would cost them their political existence. They can resist such pressure in future as has been brought on them hitherto by pointing to Bull Run, and by saying, "See the result of forcing General Scott against his wishes. " Of the Cabinet, Mr. Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury, is perhaps the only man who bore up against the disheartening intelligence of Monday morning; but Mr. Seward and others are recovering their spirits as they find that their army was more frightened than hurt, and that th<
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], The French press on the battle of Manassas (search)
Police Affairs. --The police arrested and caged the following parties yesterday evening: Tinsley P. Boatwright and James Smith, for drunkenness; Geo. Russell, for feloniously cutting Dan Anderson with a knife, and threatening to shoot Jas. McColley; Edward Sullivan, for stealing two watches from Adam, slave of J. E. Wadsworth; Wm. Dannisson, for drunkenness and chasing people in the public streets.
The "Free Press" of the Northern arrival of a British war steamer, &c. New York, Aug. 28. --The Herald says the extreme measures will be taken to suppress those papers friendly to the South. Detective officers are on every train leaving the city, to intercept packages. The British war steamer "Rindando" is below. The Washington correspondent of the Pro says that the Confederates are concentration in large numbers between the Chain Bridge (five miles above Washington) and Leesburg. The Washington correspondent of the Commercial Advertiser says that Gen. McClellan will go over the Potomac to-day, to inspect the troops, but will not permit any newspaper correspondent to accompany him, except Mr. Russell, of the London Times.
The South and England. The letter of Mr. Russell to the London Times, which is such a monstrous caricature of the battle of Manassas Plains, need not much astothe fact, no American, at least, can doubt, after reading the last letter of Mr. Russell and the accompanying comments of the Times. The impression which the whole fssity on one side, and Exeter Hall is a power in the State on the other; and Mr. Russell seems to be balancing his attention between the two, like the ass between tw. If Great Britain can hesitate in her choice between fanaticism and cotton, Mr. Russell is less of an ass than we suppose. --We do not believe she can hesitate long; we know she must bow the knee to cotton in the end; and if Mr. Russell, especially after the rout at Manassas, can be induced by Seward and Scott to believe that Eorbid philanthropy of abolitionism. We care not for the misrepresentations of Russell, or any other hireling emissary of the London Times. We have the cotton, and
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