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John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 16: the retreat. (search)
olleys, see the smoke and dust, and perhaps the occasional manoeuvres of Schenck's and Keyes' brigades. In a certain sense they were under fire, because the long-range shells of the field-pieces rendered even that locality somewhat dangerous. From this situation were written many highly sensational, but purely imaginary and most grotesquely confused accounts of the battle, first published in the newspapers. A famous correspondent of the London times, who earned the sobriquet of Bull Run Russell, wrote his description of the affair for European readers, after a leisurely lunch at Centreville, and a stroll of perhaps a mile toward Stone Bridge, taking his departure with the earliest fugitives. It also happened that on the afternoon of the battle a considerable number of provision, baggage, and ammunition wagons, together with some private vehicles of the non-combatants heretofore mentioned, had been sent down the Warrenton turnpike from Centreville, toward the stone bridge. Whe
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
Pulaski, Fort, 80 R. Rebellion, the beginning of, 1; first formal proposal of, 26 Relay House, 90 Richardson, General J. B., 174, 178 Richmond, 92; Confederate seat of government transferred to, 169 Rich Mountain, 147, 151, 153 Ricketts, Captain, 188, 191, 192 Roaring Creek, 149 Robinson, Camp Dick, 182 Robinson House, the, 187 Rosecrans, General W. S., 149, 154, 208 Runyon, General, Theodore, commands Fourth Division in advance to Manassas, 174 Russell, Dr. W. H., 202 S. Sandford, General, 168 Santa Rosa Island, 38 Schenck, General R. C., 74 Scott, General, Winfield, at Washington, 24, 49; views on the relief of Fort Sumter, 51; orders the reinforcement of Harper's Ferry, 95 et seq.; concentrates troops in Washington, 99 et seq.; protects St. Louis, 116; orders and suggestions to Patterson, 162 et seq.; his campaign plans, 171, 172 St. George, W. Va., 151 St. Louis, 116 St. Philip, Fort, 79 Secession, causes of, 1 et se
de the issues of war. Ability in combinations and bravery in executing them may fail of success where the material is wanting or deficient. An hour's delay of a corps of reserve lost the battle of Waterloo; and Napoleon fought the battle with the best troops in the world. They were cut to pieces. The United States ship Powhatan captured the Mary Clinton, from Charleston for New Orleans, off the Pass L'Outre, with a full cargo of rice, peas, &c.--New Orleans Picayune, June 1. Mr W. H. Russell's letters from the South to the London Times, create much comment. According to one dated April 30, the South Carolinians long for one of the royal race of England to rule over them.--(Doc. 217.) The Seventh Regiment, N. Y. S. M., left Washington for New York. It made a fine appearance and received on their departure the same warm eulogium that greeted their arrival.--(Doc. 218.) The National Intelligencer of to-day contains the correspondence between the bank presidents of
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
ey,301 208.Edw. Bates' Letters to J. M. Botts,304 209.New York and Georgia--Correspondence on Property,306 210.Garibaldi Guard, New York City Regiment,307 211.Meeting of Baptists at Brooklyn, May 29,307 212.Military Departments, U. S. Army,310 213.To Volunteer Nurses--(War Department,)310 214.Col. Mann's Regiment, (Pennsylvania,)311 214 1/2.London Daily News on the War, May 29,313 215.Contraband Negroes--Gen. Butler and Sec. Cameron,313 216.Maine 2d Regiment Volunteers,314 217.W. H. Russell's Letters from South Carolina and Georgia, April 30-May 1,314 218.New York 7th Regiment (S. M.) Papers,318 219.Maine 1st Regiment Volunteers,320 220.Fight at Acquia Creek,320 221.Lieut. Tompkins' Skirmish at Fairfax Court House,321 222.Jeff. Davis' Speech at Richmond, June 1,322 222 1/2.Col. Porterfield's Proclamation at Phillippa,324 223.Confederate Post Office Circular,325 224.L. W. Bliss' Proclamation in Jefferson Terr.,325 225.Central Committee's Address in Northwestern Virg
Mobile, May 12.--Mr. W. H. Russell, the correspondent of the London Times, visited Forts Morgan and Gaines to-day, accompanied by several prominent citizens. Russell made several very important suggestions to Col. Hardee, regarding the fortifications, gathered from his experience in the Crimea; and seemed well pleased with Col. Hardee's command. Mr. R. says Col. H. is every inch a soldier.--Montgomery (Ala.) Mail, May 13. Mobile, May 12.--Mr. W. H. Russell, the correspondent of the London Times, visited Forts Morgan and Gaines to-day, accompanied by several prominent citizens. Russell made several very important suggestions to Col. Hardee, regarding the fortifications, gathered from his experience in the Crimea; and seemed well pleased with Col. Hardee's command. Mr. R. says Col. H. is every inch a soldier.--Montgomery (Ala.) Mail, May 13.
ederacy, D. 19; Doc. 41; article in the., defining the positions of the United States and the Southern Confederacy, D. 66; article from, on the war tn America, D. 85; Doc. 311 London Times, article on the disunion movement, D. 16; Doc. 25; Russell, the correspondent of, D. 87 Loomis, A. W., D. 25 Lord, Daniel, Doc. 135 Loring, A.. Major, D. 94 Louisiana, Flag and seal of, P. 12; troops of, take possession of the United States marine hospital, below New Orleans, D. 13; c. 365 Rule Slavcownia, P. 88 Runyon, Brig.-Gen., D. 55 Russell, Lord, John, on the blockade, D. 83; notices of, D. 91, 301, 303; letter of, to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, Doc. 337 Russell, S. P., P. 18 Russell, W. H., correspondent of the London Times, D. 87; letters to the London Times on American affairs, April 30 and May 1, Doc. 814; his important suggestions to Col. Hardee, P. 94 Russia, position of, D. 105 Rust, A., D. 72 S Sacke
Doc. 217.-Mr. W. H. Russell's letters, of April 30 and May 1. the State of South Carolina, April 30. Nothing I could say can be worth one fact which has forced itself upon my mind in reference to the sentiments which prevail among the gentlemen of this State. I have been among them for several days. I have visited their plantations, I have conversed with them freely and fully, and I have enjoyed that frank, courteous, and graceful intercourse which constitutes an irresistible charm of their society. From all quarters have come to my ears the echoes of the same voice; it may be feigned, but there is no discord in the note, and it sounds in wonderful strength and monotony all over the country. Shades of George III., of North, of Johnson, of all who contended against the great rebellion which tore these colonies from England, can you hear the chorus which rings through the State of Marion, Sumter, and Pinckney, and not clap your ghostly hands in triumph? That voice says,
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: battle of Ossawatomie. (search)
Jackson County, will be the place of rendezvous for the whole crowd, and our motto this time will be, No quarter. Come up, then, on Wednesday, and let us have concert of action. Let no one stay away. We need the old men to advise, the young men to execute. We confidently look for eight hundred to one thousand citizens to be present. At the same time a similar address, more general in its character, was issued from Westport, and dated August 16. It was signed by David R. Atchison, W. H. Russell, A. G. Boone, and B. F. Stringfellow. Thus appealed to, a force of two thousand men assembled at the village of Santa Fe, on the border; and, after entering the Territory, divided into two forces --one division, led by Senator Atchison, marching to Bull Creek, and the other wing, under General Reid, advancing to Ossawatomie. The force under Atchison fled precipitately on the morning of August 31, on the approach of General Lane, and after a slight skirmish between the advance guard
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: fallen among thieves. (search)
quads, were ready for a dash at the door. Finally, Lieutenant Stuart, having failed to arrange terms with the determined Captain Brown, walked slowly from the door. Immediately the signal for attack was given, and the marines, headed by Major Russell and Lieutenant Green, advanced in two lines on each side of the door. Two powerful fellows sprung between the lines, and with heavy sledge hammers attempted to batter down the door. The door swung and swayed, but appeared to be secured withof a ladder, some forty feet long, and, advancing at a run, brought it with tremendous effect against the door. At the second blow it gave way, one leaf falling inward in a slanting position. The marines immediately advanced to the breach, Major Russell and Lieutenant Green leading. A marine in front fell. The firing from the interior was rapid and sharp. They fired with deliberate aim, and for a moment the resistance was serious, and desperate enough to excite the spectators to something
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
ys been at his side, He knows God is with him, and fears nothing. On the 2d of November, Judge Russell, of Boston, and his wife, When that Boston wife went down to John Brown's prison, and stood believe that slavery is right. He will die as fearlessly as he has lived. The visit of Judge Russell and his wife was not liked by the self-styled hospitable Virginians, but they were permitteded for his death, and which he has not the slightest hope of seeing put off a single hour. Mrs. Russell, wife of Judge Russell, visited him the other day, and had a long chat with him. He appears —Judge Russell, visited him the other day, and had a long chat with him. He appears — very much pleased with the lady's manner, and was very communicative with her. In illustrating his own character, he said that he had never known what fear was when brought into opposition or collisvery awkward, and very painful, also, when entering the society of women. The interview with Mrs. Russell seemed to touch the old man's heart, and no woman could turn from him, so full of trials and
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