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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 4 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 51 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 3 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 10 4 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
s observations to General Lee. Afterward he made a second reconnoissance, accompanied by Colonel Albert Rust, of the Third l19 Arkansas Regiment, who was anxious to see the nature of the ground anduld be guided to the point they had reached. General Lee decided to make the attack, and gave to Rust a column of twelve hundred infantry, with such capable officers as Taliaferro and Fulkerson. Genthout the knowledge of the enemy, where they waited, every moment expecting to hear the rattle of Rust's muskets, who had been charged with the capture of the pass on Cheat Mountain; but hour after hod been sent with Major W. H. F. Lee to reconnoiter the enemy, was killed from an ambuscade. Colonel Rust did not report to General Lee until the next day-September 13, 1861; he admits that he got toly fortified. He made a reconnoissance and found these representations were fully corroborated. Rust claims in his reports that spies had communicated the movements of the Confederate troops to the
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
, 65. Richmond, the race for, 333; Petersburg and Richmond lines abandoned, 379; occupied by United States troops, 381; evacuated, 381. Ricketts, General, mentioned, 190, 192. Ringgold Barracks, 61, 62. Ripley, General, 130. Robertson, General, Beverley, 184, 187, 285. Rockbridge Artillery, 323. Rodes, General, 249-252. Rosecrans, General William S., 115, 127, 122, 123, 119. Rosser's cavalry brigade, 353, 384, 371. Round Top, 282. Russell's division, 318, 319. Rust, Colonel, Albert, 119, 120, 121. Sanders, General, killed, 363. Sanford, General, Charles, 105. Santa Anna, General, 31, 32, 38. San Jacinto, battle of, 31. Schenck, General, mentioned, 143. Schofield, General John M., joins Sherman, 372. Scott, General, Winfield, mentioned, 19, 33, 40, 44, 46; notice of, 48; mentioned, 52, 54, 85, 101, 103, 105, 176; autobiography, 374; mentioned, 423. Seceding States, the, 84. Second United States Cavalry, 54, 56, 58. Seddon's dispatch from
tle will soon occur at Fort Pickens are mere conjectures. Of the plans of any of those in command nothing is known outside of Headquarters. Our own impression, formed while in Pensacola, is that there will be no battle at all at Pickens, or at least that it is not now the intention of the Confederate authorities to attack it. Arkansas was by unanimous vote admitted a State of the Southern Confederacy, and its delegates to the Southern Congress. They are R. W. Johnson, of Pine Bluff; A. Rust, of Little Rock; A. H. Garland, of Little Rock; W. W. Watkins, of Carrollton; H. F. Thomasson, of Van Buren,--N. Y. Times, May 26. Three merchants of Baltimore, Jerome A. Pendergrast, James Whiteford, and George McGowan, were arrested charged with riotous conduct in obstructing the track of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad on the 19th of April, while the Massachusetts troops were en route to Washington. They were under indictment by the Grand Jury, and were admitted to bail.--N. Y. Tim
September 9. The Richmond Examiner of this day says: A few days ago Col. Albert Rust, commanding one of the regiments from Arkansas, and now stationed at Monterey, proposed to execute a most daring feat, which, but for untoward circumstances, ayonet and bowie-knife. General Jackson was to cooperate with him by menacing and attacking the enemy in front so soon as Rust should develop his arrival in the rear by firing. Unfortunately for the success of the enterprise, the trail had not been previously explored, and, instead of carrying Col. Rust to the enemy's camp, took him six miles behind it, in a direction which rendered it inaccessible, leaving them no other resources but to execute an immediate retreat. So confidently was success counted on that Gen. Jackson drove in the enemy's pickets, and waited nearly half a day for the signal of Rust's arrival in the rear to commence the attack in front. This morning a serious revolt took place among the New York Rifles, near the
July 7. The steamer Emilie, formerly the Wm. Seabrook, of Charleston, S. C., was captured off Bull's Bay, S. C., by the United States steamer Flag and the bark Restless.--At New Orleans, La., the system of distributions and sales of provisions to the poor of that city went into operation.--The Anglo-rebel steamer Adela was captured off Abaco, by the National gunboat Quaker City.--Official Reports. The Common Council of Buffalo, N. Y., appropriated eighty thousand dollars for the purpose of raising a new regiment, giving seventy-five dollars bounty for each recruit.--Gen. Burnside's army arrived in the James River, Va. The battle of the Cache, Ark., was fought this day by the National forces, under Col. C. E. Hovey, and over two thousand rebel troops, commanded by Albert Rust, resulting in the defeat and rout of the latter with a severe loss.--(Doc. 82.)
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
nt. He showed the way to his own quarters, having previously requested that several National officers who were approaching might, as a matter of courtesy, be desired to remain outside until the preliminaries were adjusted. This was accorded him, and an interview of an hour took place, at which only himself and General Gillmore were present. The terms of the capitulation having been settled, General Gillmore was shown over the fort by the colonel, and then took his leave, accompanied by Colonel Rust. Messengers from General Hunter had meantime arrived. These, together with General Gillmore's aide, made the rounds of the fort under the escort of Colonel Olmstead, who introduced us to his officers, and were the only persons present when the swords were delivered. Major Halpine, as the representative of General Hunter, received the weapons. The ceremony was performed in the colonel's headquarters, all standing. It was just at dark, and the candles gave only a half-light. The weapo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
rted that General John C. Breckinridge, of Van Dorn's command, had gone to Kentucky with three Kentucky regiments, leaving his division under the command of General Albert Rust. The combined forces under Van Dorn and Price were reported to be encamped on the Pocahontas road, and to number forty thousand. In fact about 22,000, ader deemed the main line of the Union forces for the defense of Corinth. Upon this position moved three brigades of Lovell's division,--Villepigue's, Bowen's, and Rust's,--in line, with reserves in rear of each; Jackson's cavalry was on the right en échelon, the left flank on the Charleston railroad; Price's corps of two division. Henry H. Sengstak. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 14 = 19. District of the Mississippi. first division, Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albert Rust: 4th Ala., Battalion, Maj.----Gibson; 31st Ala.,----; 35th Ala., Capt. A. E. Ashford; 9th Ark., Col. Isaac L. Dunlop; 3d Ky., Col. A. P. Thompson; 7th Ky.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
isfied there was no enemy for three miles beyond Hatchie; also, that prisoners reported that General John C. Breckinridge, of Van Dorn's command, had gone to Kentucky with three Kentucky regiments, leaving his division under the command of General Albert Rust. The combined forces under Van Dorn and Price were reported to be encamped on the Pocahontas road, and to number forty thousand. In fact about 22,000, as stated by Van Dorn in the report quoted. And see With Price East of the Mississiur with his brigade, and by Crocker, who moved up toward what the Confederate commander deemed the main line of the Union forces for the defense of Corinth. Upon this position moved three brigades of Lovell's division,--Villepigue's, Bowen's, and Rust's,--in line, with reserves in rear of each; Jackson's cavalry was on the right en échelon, the left flank on the Charleston railroad; Price's corps of two divisions was on the left of Lovell. Thus the Confederate general proceeded, until, at 10
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
Brigade loss: k, 94; w, 273; m, 200 = 567. Cavalry (composition probably incomplete), Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong: 2d Ark., Col. W. F. Slemons; Miss. Reg't, Col. Wirt Adams; 2d Mo., Col. Robert McCulloch. Cavalry loss: w, 2; om, 9 = 11. Reserve Artillery: Tenn. Battery (Hoxton's), Lieut. Thomas F. Tobin (c); Alta. Battery, Capt. Henry H. Sengstak. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 14 = 19. District of the Mississippi. first division, Maj.-Gen. Mansfield Lovell. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Albert Rust: 4th Ala., Battalion, Maj.----Gibson; 31st Ala.,----; 35th Ala., Capt. A. E. Ashford; 9th Ark., Col. Isaac L. Dunlop; 3d Ky., Col. A. P. Thompson; 7th Ky., Col. Ed. Cross-land; Miss. (Hudson), Battery, Lieut. John R. Sweaney. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 117 ; m, 83 = 225. Second Brigade (composition not fully reported), Brig.-Gen. J. B. Villepigue: 33d Miss., Col. D. W. Hurst; 39th Miss., Col. W. B. Shelby. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 76; m, 71 = 168. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John S. Bow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
gun-boat expedition See Naval operations, to follow.-editors. to relieve him from this precarious situation determined him to retreat across the swamps to Helena. Hindman resolved to attack him. Sending a considerable force under Brigadier-General Albert Rust to get between the retreating army and Helena, and to hold the crossing of the almost impassable Cache, he himself set off in pursuit. But Rust, though a very successful politician, was one of the most incompetent of all political geRust, though a very successful politician, was one of the most incompetent of all political generals, and was easily brushed out of the way by Curtis, who, conquering the greater obstacles which Nature opposed to his march, got safely to Helena on the 13th of July. Meanwhile the Confederate Government, yielding to the importunities of General Price and of the representatives of the States west of the Mississippi, and alarmed by the progress of the Union armies in that direction, determined to prosecute more vigorously the war in the West, and to make some effort to recover Missouri an
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