Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Ruth or search for Ruth in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
liations, and his business ventures operated unfavourably upon his lyrical poetry. Although his fervour was reawakened by the French Revolution and again by the War of 1812, almost all his best lyrics were written between 1775 and 1790. In the main these concern the American Indian, the smaller objects of nature, and the sea, and in subject at least are altogether original. The Indian Burying ground is well known; The Indian student, which curiously anticipates some phases of Wordsworth's Ruth, and The dying Indian, are scarcely less fine. His nature lyrics, such as The wild Honeysuckle, the Caty-did, and On the Sleep of plants, are the first to give lyrical expression to American nature. Their simplicity and restraint suggest Collins and Gray, but they are not imitative, and it is probable that Freneau is more original in even the style of his lyrics than has generally been acknowledged. To a man of ninety would at once be lighted upon as an imitation of Wordsworth had it not a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
olume. The frontispiece represents Mico Chlucco the Long Warrior, or King of the Siminoles, whose dancing crest of splendid feathers flashes again in Wordsworth's Ruth. A bare survey does scant justice to the richness of form and colour in Bartram's pages. At one time he is struck with the tall aspiring Gordonia lasianthus. der elastic peduncles, at the extremities of its numerous branches, from the bosom of the leaves, and renewed every morning --the budding, fading, faded flowers of Ruth. Or again we see the solitary dejected wood-pelican, alone on the topmost limb of a dead cypress; it looks extremely grave, sorrowful, and melancholy, as if in themodem books that I read are those of travels, or such as relate to matters of fact-and the only modem books that I care for. What they meant to him may be seen in Ruth, which is full of images from Bartram — the magnolia, the cypress, green savannas, and scarlet flowers that set the hills on fire; in The Complaint of a Forsaken I
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Rolfe, John, 225 Rolliad, the, 171, 174 Romeo and Juliet, 265 Roscoe, William, 255 Rose, Aquila, 161 Rose of Aragon, 231 Rosemary, 263 Rousseau, 102, 119, 187, 188, 199, 208, 213, 331, 346 Rowe, 116 Rowlandson, Mrs., Mary, 6, 7 Rowson, Mrs., Susanna, 179, 226, 285, 286 Royal America magazine, the, 123 Rules by which a great Empire may be reduced to a small one, 98, 140 Ruling passion, the, 179 Rural poems, 163 Rural Wanderer, the, 234 Rush, Benjamin, 91 Ruth, 183, 197, 213 Ryan's Company, 218 S St. Asaph, Bishop of, 103 St. Augustine, 59 St. Francis, 104 Salmagundi, 233, 238-239, 240, 247, 311 Sands, 240 Sandys, Edward, 18 Saratoga springs, 229 Sargent, Epes, 223, 224 Sargent, Winthrop, 175 Sarony, Otto, 278 Satanstoe, 305, 311 Saunterer, the, 234 Savage, Mrs., 227 Savage, John, 225 n. Savonarola, 344 Savoyard Vicar, 105 Say and Sele, Lord, 37 n. Schelling, 332, 332 n., 357 Schiller, 19