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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 5 (search)
nto Mr. Ben Bowdre's stable and took possession of his carriage horses, and helped themselves to two from the buggies of quiet citizens on the square. Almost everybody I know has had horses stolen or violently taken from him. I was walking with Dr. Sale in the street yesterday evening, and a soldier passed us leading a mule, while the rightful owner followed after, wasting breath in useless remonstrances. As they passed us, the soldier called out: A man that's going to Texas must have a mule to ride, don't you think so, lady? I made no answer, Dr. Sale gave a doubtful assent. It is astonishing what a demoralizing influence association with horses seems to exercise over the human race. Put a man on horseback and his next idea is to play the bully or to steal something. We had an instance of illbehavior at our house last night — the first and only one that has occurred among the hundreds-thousands, I might almost say, that have stopped at our door. Our back yard and kitchen were
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, V. In the dust and ashes of defeat (may 6-June 1, 1865). (search)
rigade of Kentucky cavalry camped out in Mr. Wiley's grove, and some fear is felt of a Collision between them and the Yankees. Some of them have already engaged in fist fights on their own account. I wish they would get into a general row, for I believe the Kentuckians would whip them. I am just exasperated enough to be reckless as to consequences. Think of a lot of negroes being brought here to play the master over us! I was walking on the street this afternoon with Mr. Dodd and a Lieut. Sale, from Ark., when we met three gorgeous Yankee officers, flaunting their smart new uniforms in the faces of our poor, shabby Rebs, but I would not even look their way till they had passed and couldn't see me. Oh, how I do love the dear old Confederate gray! My heart sickens to think that soon I shall have seen the last of it. The Confederate officers who have been stationed here are leaving, as fast as they can find the means, for their homes, or for the Trans-Mississippi, where some of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
taff-officer General Bragg, I pointed out the necessity of great preparations to take the offensive, such as large additions to the number of troops, an ample supply of field transportation, subsistence stores, and forage, a bridge equipage, and fresh artillery horses. This letter was acknowledged on the 4th of March, but not really replied to until the 12th, when General Bragg [see note, Vol. III., p. 711] wrote a plan of campaign which was delivered to me on the 18th by his secretary, Colonel Sale. It prescribed my invasion of Tennessee with an army of 75,000 men, including Longstreet's corps, then near Morristown, Tennessee. When necessary supplies and transportation were collected at Dalton, the additional troops, except Longstreet's, would be sent there; and this army and Longstreet's corps would march to meet at Kingston, on the Tennessee River, and thence into the valley of Duck River. Being invited to give my views, I suggested that the enemy could defeat the plan, eithe
avis, dated January 2d, 1 864, he speaks thus : Johnston's Narrative, page 275. I can see no other mode of taking the offensive here than to beat the enemy when he advances, and then move forward. In response to General Bragg's letter of March 12th, proffering fully eighty thousand (80,000) men, as an inducement to assume the offensive, and to which letter I have already referred, General Johnston dispatched the following telegram: Johnston's Narrative, page 294. Your letter by Colonel Sale received. Grant is at Nashville. Where Grant is we must expect the great Federal effort. We ought, therefore, to be prepared to beat him here --at Dalton. In his written reply to the same, he says: Johnston's Narrative, page 295. We cannot estimate the time he (the enemy) will require for preparation, and should, consequently, put ourselves in condition for successful resistance as soon as possible by assembling here the troops you enumerate. Again, Johnston's Narrative, page 2
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 10 (search)
hold its ground. Our army that takes the offensive should be our strongest in relation to its enemy. On the 18th Colonel Sale, General Bragg's military secretary, brought me the following letter from that officer, dated the 12th: General: Ichmond. The telegram, dispatched in an hour or two, was in these words, addressed to General Bragg: Your letter by Colonel Sale received. Grant is at Nashville; Sherman, by last accounts, at Memphis; where Grant is, we must expect the great Fedeaddressed also to General Bragg on the same day: General: I had the honor to receive your letter of the 12th from Colonel Sale yesterday, and to make a suggestion, by telegraph, on the subject to which it relates. Permit me to suggest that tBesides the foregoing, other reasons for opposing the plan of operations explained by General Bragg, were committed to Colonel Sale, to be delivered orally-such as: That the interior positions belonged to the enemy, instead of being held by us as was
all times from one portion of the Confederacy to the other! Truly, here is a great contrast of position; one that should awaken Northern fanatics and insane politicians to a true sense of the unpopularity of their war against the South; and fully picturing to them the shadow and the substance of North American affairs. John. --Natchez Courier, May 21. Gen. Pillow, who is a clever gentleman in the private relations of life, and a very companionable man, sent us a message recently, which is explained in the following reply:-- Gen. Gideon Pillow:--I have just received your message through Mr. Sale, requesting me to serve as Chaplain to your Brigade in the Southern army; and in the spirit of kindness in which this request is made, but in all candor, I return for answer, that when I shall have made up my mind to go to hell, I will cut my throat and go direct, and not travel round by the Southern Confederacy. I am very respectfully, &c., W. G. Brownlow. --Knoxville Whig.
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
escape, and in company with General Breckinridge made his way to Florida, sailing thence in an open boat to Cuba. Since the war he has resided at Halifax. John Burress sale John Burress Sale, of Mississippi, served as military secretary with rank of colonel of cavalry to General Braxton Bragg, who was assigned to duty at Richmond February 24, 1864, and under the direction of the President, was charged with the conduct of military operations in the armies of the Confederate States. Colonel Sale was thus brought into intimate relationship with the President's military staff. He was born in Amherst county, Virginia, June 7, 1818. His father, an eminent divine, moved to Alabama, and he was educated in the college at LaGrange. He read law and was admitted to the bar in 1837, and two years later, at the age of twenty-one years, was chosen judge of probate. In 1845 he removed to Aberdeen, Mississippi, and there practiced law until 1861, when he organized a company of volunteers,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ng their camp, wagons and stores, and a number of prisoners in Wheeler's care. In reply to an inquiry from General Johnston he was informed by General Bragg, now acting as military adviser with office at Richmond, that he was desired to have everything in readiness for a forward movement at the earliest practicable moment, but a definite increase of his army, which Johnston requested, was not promised. General Johnston was furnished a plan of campaign by the war department, brought by Colonel Sale, General Bragg's military secretary, in which it appeared that the great result desired by the Confederate government was the reclaiming of the provision country of Kentucky and Tennessee, and an increase of the army by recruits. To aid in taking the offensive there would be sent him 5,000 men from Polk and 10,000 from Beauregard, as soon as he was ready to use them, giving him a total strength, including Longstreet's corps, of 75,000. In acknowledging the receipt of this plan of campai
-Gen. A. J. Smith at Oxford, Miss., who had with him a force of 4,800 cavalry and a large body of infantry and artillery. The troops accompanying Forrest were the company commanded by Capt. W. H. Forrest; Col. J. J. Neely's Tennessee regiment; the Second Missouri; the Fourteenth Tennessee, Colonel White; the Eighteenth Mississippi; the Twelfth and Fifteenth Tennessee, Lieutenant-Colonel Logwood and Lieut.-Col. Jesse Forrest; Bell's Tennessee brigade, with a section of Morton's battery, Lieutenant Sale in reserve, and not engaged in the city proper. This considerable force was withdrawn from the front of Smith without arousing a suspicion on the part of the Federal commander, for the purpose of diverting Smith's column from an advance south of Oxford, the Confederate commander being sensible of the inability of his small command to give battle successfully. General Washburn, in his official report, remarks that the fact that Forrest should have left our immediate front at Oxford a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
The enemy evidently thought they were being attacked by Forrest's whole force. Forrest realized the great responsibility resting on him, and knowing his inability to successfully oppose such a large force, resolved to make a counter movement by threatening Memphis, and possibly thereby force General Smith to retire. After discussing the matter with General Chalmers he decided to take certain regiments of Bell's and Neeley's brigades, and two rifled guns of Morton's Battery, under Lieutenant Sale, and make the attempt. Without further parley he led the little column of 1,500 men and two guns away, while General Chalmers endeavored to conceal the movement from the enemy. Forrest left Oxford about 5 P. M., Auguust 18, in a hard rain, which had been falling for two days and nights. The streams were all bankfull, and it was necessary for him to go to Panola before he was able to cross the Tallahatchie, forty miles out of the direct course. Arriving at Panola, about 100 of his h
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