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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 50 results in 21 document sections:

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
  Cotton, 45 bales 21,977 77 1,623 27 20,354 50 do Oct. 6, 1865 Santiago de Cuba Schooner Delight 600 00 251 65 348 25 New York July 21, 1863 New London, R. R Cuyler, Massachusetts. Brig Delta 11,628 00 6,931 18 4,696 82 do Nov. 25, 1863 Santee. Schooner Dixie 30,950 87 2,429 64 28,521 23 Philadelphia Mar. 13, 1863 Keystone State, Gem of the Sea. Schooner Defiance 3,773 78 1,073 40 2,700 38 do Mar. 11, 1863 Braziliera. Schooner Director 285 10 128 99 156 11 Washington May 4, 18ion. Schooner Guide. 20,407 67 1,549 53 18,858 14 do Nov. 6, 1862 Huron. Schooner Glide 22,980 84 1,609 21 21,371 63 do Oct. 14, 1864 Marblehead, Passaic, Arago, Caswell. Schooner Garonne 3,130 70 1,079 44 2,051 26 New York Mar. 11, 1863 Santee. Schooner Gipsy. 9,162 97 1,397 23 7,765 74 do Aug. 20, 1863 New London, Massachusetts. Schooner Granite City 68,829 81 4 253 44 64,576 37 do Nov. 20, 1863 Tioga. Steamer Gertrude 88,987 60 8,913 31 80,074 29 do Nov. 20, 1863 Vanderbilt.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
Fear Rivers; then, communicating with the fleet in the neighborhood of Georgetown, I would turn upon Wilmington or Charleston, according to the importance of either. I rather prefer Wilmington, as a live place, over Charleston, which is dead and unimportant when its railroad communications are broken. I take it for granted that the present movement on Wilmington will fail. If I should determine to take Charleston, I would turn across the country (which I have hunted over many a time) from Santee to Mount Pleasant, throwing one wing on the peninsula between the Ashley and Cooper. After accomplishing one or other of these ends, I would make a bee-line for Raleigh or Weldon, when Lee would be forced to come out of Richmond, or acknowledge himself beaten. He would, I think, by the use of the Danville Railroad, throw himself rapidly between me and Grant, leaving Richmond in the hands of the latter. This would not alarm me, for I have an army which I think can manoeuvre, and I would fo
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
ure, both old and young, are those of men ready at any and all times for a fight or a frolic on their beloved ship. The old navy--three veterans of the line: Santee, constitution, and MacEDONIANDONIANdoniandonian In the center of this war-time photograph rides the famous frigate Constitution. She was one of the four fighshe sailed in Commodore Perry's fleet that opened Japan to American commerce. The outbreak of the war found her lying at Vera Cruz. The frigate on the left, the Santee, was a later addition to the navy, also mounting fifty guns. She served on blockade duty, chiefly in the Gulf, during the war. There, while lying off Galveston, her more powerful descendant, and lying near the center of the picture is now relegated to the position of receiving-ship. At the end of the wharf is tied up the Santee, on whose deck many a midshipman has paced out the sentry duty with which he was punished for the infringement of regulations. Between the two lies the Saratoga,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eutaw Springs, (search)
s, rushing and foaming, into a cavern beneath a high ridge of marl, covered with alluvium and forest trees. After traversing its subterranean way some 30 rods, it reappears on the other side, where it is a broader stream, of sufficient volume to turn a mill-wheel. It flows over a smooth, rocky bed, shaded by cypress-trees, about 2 miles, when it enters the Santee. It was near this spring that a severe battle was fought, Sept. 8, 1781. Early in August, General Greene, on the High Hills of Santee, was reinforced by North Carolina troops under General Sumner; and at the close of that month he crossed the Wateree and Congaree and marched against the British camp at Orangeburg, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Stuart. Rawdon had left these troops in Stuart's charge and returned to England. Stuart, who had been joined by the garrison of Fort Ninety-six, immediately retreated, on the approach of Greene, to Eutaw Springs, 40 miles eastward, and there encamped. Greene pursued so stealthil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Reservations,
Indian
(search)
inte Wisconsin. Lemhi Idaho. Lower Brule South Dakota. Mackinac Michigan. Mescalero New Mexico. Mission-Tule River California. NavajoNew Mexico. Neah Bay Washington. Nevada Nevada. New York New York. Nez Perces Idaho. Omaha and Winnebago Nebraska. OsageOklahoma. Pima Arizona. Pine Ridge South Dakota. Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, and Oakland Oklahoma. Pottawattomie and Great Nemaha Kansas. Pueblo and Jicarilla New Mexico. PuyallupWashington. QuapawIndian Territory. RosebudSouth Dakota. Round Valley California. Sac and FoxIowa. Sac and Fox Oklahoma. San Carlos Arizona. Santee Nebraska. Seminole Florida. Shoshone Wyoming. Siletz Oregon. Sisseton South Dakota. Southern Ute Colorado. Standing Rock North Dakota. Tongue River Montana. TulalipWashington. Uintah and Ouray Utah. Umatilla Oregon. Union Indian Territory. Walker River Reservation Nevada. Warm Springs Oregon. Western Shoshone Nevada. White Earth Minnesota. YakimaWashington. Yankton South Dakota.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
In 1704 the Provincial Assembly of South Carolina passed an act for the establishment of the Church of England as the legal Church of the colony, and requiring all public officers to conform to its doctrine and ritual. The province was divided into ten parishes, lands were granted for glebes and churchyards, and salaries, payable from the provincial treasury, were fixed and appointed for the rectors. The regulation included the French settlements on the Fig-growing in South Carolina. Santee and the Dutch settlement on the Ashley. Several churches were soon afterwards built. A commission was appointed for the displacing of rectors and ministers of the churches. A portion of the acts establishing the Anglican Church in South Carolina were disapproved by some of the proprietors as well as by the people. These acts were referred to the lords of trade and plantations, and A bit of Charleston, S. C. were declared void by the Queen in 1705, but the Church party remained dominant
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, Jethro 1730-1790 (search)
Sumner, Jethro 1730-1790 Military officer; born in Virginia about 1730, was paymaster of the provincial troops in North Carolina in 1760, and commander of Fort Cumberland. In the spring of 1776 he was appointed colonel by the Provincial Congress, and with his regiment joined Washington's army. He was made brigadiergeneral in the Continental service in 1779, and in 1780 was engaged in the battle near Camden. In 1781, after active service in North Carolina, he joined Greene in the High Hills of Santee; was in the battle of Eutaw Springs, and was active in overawing the Tories in North Carolina until the close of the war. He died in Warren county, N. C., about 1790.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, Fort, capture of (search)
ed it. In April, 1781, it was garrisoned by eighty regulars and forty loyalists, under the command of Lieutenant McKay, when Marion and Lee appeared before it and demanded its surrender. Colonel Watson was on his way from Georgetown with a large force to assist McKay, and the latter promptly defied Marion and Lee. The latter had no cannon, and the stockade was too high to be seriously affected by small-arms. Lieutenant Maham, of Marion's brigade, planned and built a tower of logs sufficiently high to overlook the stockade, with a parapet at the top for the defence of sharp-shooters placed therein. This work was accomplished during a dark night, and at dawn the garrison was awakened by a shower of bullets from a company of riflemen on the top of the tower. Another party ascended the mound and attacked the abatis with vigor. Resistance was vain. The fort, untenable, was surrendered (April 23), and, with the garrison as prisoners, Marion pushed northward to the High Hills of Santee.
your telegram, informing you that I would be able to furnish an artillery officer to make the examination of the Santee River, referred to by you in your telegram, asking you to name when and where he should report, but thus far I have received no answer. Meanwhile I have read with satisfaction the excellent report of Mr. Niernsee relative to his reconnoissance of the Santee River, from Lownde's Ferry to Nowell's Point, and of the information obtained by him relative to the North and South Santee, from the point of junction to their mouths. My conclusion is, that Nowell's Point is the proper position to be fortified, and the river ought to be obstructed, not more than four hundred yards below the fort. This obstruction, I think, can be made of several rows of piles (should the bottom permit it), interlaced with a properly constructed abatis of trees—live-oaks, if possible. As it is not probable that the enemy's ironclad boats will be able to ascend to that point of the river, th
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Light Batteries in the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, December, 1864. (search)
olina. 4Marion ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. E. L. Parker4      5Wagner ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. C. E. Kanapaux22     6Chestnut ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. F. C. Shultz 4     7Washington ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. G. H. Walter2  2   8Furman ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. W. E. Earle12 1    9Beaufort Volunteer ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. H. M. Stuart22      10German ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. W. R. Backman4       11Lafayette ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. J. F. Kanapaux 4      12Santee Light ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. C. Gaillard  2 2   13Inglis Light ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. Wm. E. Charles  4     14DePass' Light ArtillerySouth CarolinaCapt. W. L. DePass2  2    15Colcock's Light Artillery (section)South CarolinaLieut. Johnson2       16Chatham ArtilleryGeorgiaCapt. J. F. Wheaton4       17Regular Light BatteryGeorgiaCapt. J. A. Maxwell4       18Guerard's Light BatteryGeorgiaCapt. Jno. M. Guerard22
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