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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 49 41 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 3 1 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 2 0 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
on Ives of Connecticut. Dashing Kilpatrick is far away. Grand Gregg we do not see; nor level-headed Smith, nor indomitable Prin. Cilley, with his 1st Maine Cavalry; these now sent to complete the peace around Petersburg. Now rides the provost marshal general, gallant George Macy of the 20th Massachusetts, his right arm symbolized by an empty sleeve pinned across his breast. Here the 2d Pennsylvania Cavalry, and stout remnants of the 1st Massachusetts, reminding us of the days of Sargent and Sam Chamberlain. Here, too, the 3d and Ioth U. S. Infantry, experienced in stern duties. Now, with heads erect and steady eyes, marches the Signal Corps; of those that beckoned us to the salvation of Round Top, and disclosed movements and preparations otherwise concealed in the dense maze and whirl of battle from the Wilderness to the Chickahominy; then from their lofty observatories watching the long ferment on the Appomattox shores. What message do your signals waft us now?
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April, 1863. (search)
s green in the face with fatigue and rage. Mr. Sargent received us with the greatest affability, as the mules quite as much as licking them. Mr. Sargent accounts for his humanity by saying, It's t of the day, just in front of her door. Mr. Sargent bought two chickens and some eggs at a ranc One of our mules was kicked last night. Mr. Sargent rubbed the wound with brandy, which did it , our stock being very nearly expended. Mr. Sargent, who was now comparatively sober. killed tally devouring it, and found it very good. Mr. Sargent cooked it by the simple process of stewing ut, on returning to the road, we found that Mr. Sargent had pursued his usual plan of leaving us in it at a small creek; and after unhitching, Mr. Sargent and the Judge had a row with one another, an, undulating prairie, and halted at 10.30. Mr. Sargent and I killed and cooked the two chickens. l! who's afraid of fire? proclaimed that Mr. Sargent had come in sight of Grey's ranch. Afte[35 more...]
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Second joint debate, at Freeport, August 27, 1858. (search)
when he was pledged not to do so unless Lincoln was in favor of those resolutions. I now ask Mr. Turner [turning to Mr. Turner], did you violate your pledge in voting for Mr. Lincoln, or did he commit himself to your platform before you cast your vote for him? I could go through the whole list of names here and show you that all the Black Republicans in the Legislature, who voted for Mr. Lincoln, had voted on the day previous for these resolutions. For instance, here are the names of Sargent and Little of Jo Daviess and Carroll, Thomas J. Turner of Stephenson, Lawrence of Boone and McHenry, Swan of Lake, Pinckney of Ogle county, and Lyman of Winnebago. Thus you see every member from your Congressional District voted for Mr. Lincoln, and they were pledged not to vote for him unless he was committed to the doctrine of no more slave States, the prohibition of slavery in the Territories, and the repeal of the Fugitive Slave law. Mr. Lincoln tells you to-day that he is not pledged
ed for him. Mr. Campbell, of Pennsylvania, declared his readiness to vote the last man and the last dollar for the accomplishment of the great object before us. I am ready to fight it out by land and by sea, as long as may be necessary to crush out the rebels themselves, and all their sympathizers at home and abroad. Mr. Wright, of Pennsylvania, was not opposed to the spirit of the bill, but he thought some of its provisions in conflict with the Constitution, and he desired to amend it. Mr. Sargent, of California, was in favor of the bill, because it distributes equally the burdens of the war, laying them as well upon the lukewarm friends or the open opponents of the Government as upon the. true and faithful; because it prevents the possibility of demagogues, who seek the ruin of the republic, longer preventing the enlistment of soldiers to fight this great battle of freedom. Mr. Sheffield, of Rhode Island, thought the law would put to a severe test the loyalty of the people; in th
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 15: Chancellorsville (search)
rnes, McQuade, Stockton842 MeadeSykesAyres, Burbank, O'Rorke 15,724HumphreysTyler, Allabach 6thBrooksBrown, Bartlett, Russell954 SedgwickHoweGrant, Neill NewtonShaler, Brown, Wheaton 23,667BurnhamBurnham corpsDIVISIONSBRIGADESARTILLERY Batts.Guns 11thDevensVon Gilsa, McLean636 HowardVon SteinwehrBuschbeck, Barlow 12,977SchurzSchimmelpfennig, Krzyzanowski 12th528 SlocumWilliamsKnipe, Ross, Ruger 13,450GearyCandy, Kane, Greene CavalryPleasontonDavis, Devin522 StonemanAverellSargent, McIntosh GreggKilpatrick, Wyndham 11,544Reserve Brig.Buford 1,610Artillery Reserve1258 2,217Provost Guard210 8 Corps, 23 Divisions, 64 Brigades, 133,711 Men, 74 Batteries, 404 Guns The nearest Confederate return is for March 21. It is not entirely complete for the artillery and cavalry, but, estimating for them, Lee's organization and strength at that date was as follows: 1ST corps, Longstreet's, march 31, 1863 DIVISIONSSTRENGTHBRIGADESBATTS.guns Anderson's8,232Wilcox, Wri
3Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Richardson, Christopher C., Jr.,21Haverhill, Ma.Nov. 15, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Russell, Isaac H.,23Charlestown, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Sampson, Charles H.,18Boston, Ma.Dec. 21, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Sanborn, Charles O.,24Medford, Ma.Feb. 1, 1862Jan. 31, 1865, expiration of service. Sanborn, Cutler D.,21Medford, Ma.July 31, 1861June 27, 1862, disability. Sargent, Russell B.,36Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Schroder, Charles H.,18Boston, Ma.Dec. 31, 1863Jan. 4, 1864, rejected recruit. Scott, Rufus P.,24Hadley, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Seavy, Leonard C.,24Saco, Me.,July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Seaward, William,21Duxbury, Ma.Jan. 21, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Sebeane, Silas,32Hadley, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Senter, Charles
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
d France ( inimitable France and incomparable Italy ), and then, from about the year 1880, in the England of his adoption,--making his bachelor home in London or in the old Cinque Port of Rye. But he continued almost to the end to publish his novels and tales in the great American magazines, so that his first appeal was generally to the public here. Evidences of the honour in which he was held in England were the Order of Merit conferred upon him at New Year's, 1916; and his portrait by Sargent, undertaken on the occasion of his seventieth birthday, at the invitation of some two hundred and fifty English friends. At the outbreak of the War, none was more enthusiastic for the cause of the Allies, which was associated with everything he held most precious. His feeling for England at this time, on looking out across the channel from his Sussex home, is described in what is perhaps his latest piece of writing, Within the Rim, published in the Fortnightly Review in August, 1917. It
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
45, 463 Salmagundi, 110, 114 Salon in America, the, 121 Salter, 264 n. 's alt Marik-Haus mittes in d'r Schtadt, 585 Salvation Nell, 294 Samantha at Saratoga, 26 Samuels, Capt. S., 136 Sanctuary, 277 Sandburg, Carl, 65 Sandys, 445 n. Sankey, 500 Sannazaro, 446 Santa Anna, 133 Santayana, G., 129, 243 n., 258-262, 258 n., 261 n., 262 n., 263 Santa Ilario, 88 Sappho, 119 Sappho and Phaon, 277 Saracinesca, 88 Saratoga, 270, 271, 274, 275, 276 Sargent, 102 Sartain, John, 314 Sartain's Union magazine of literature and art, 314 Saturday press (New York), 4 Saur, Christopher, 535, 536, 574, 575, 576 Saunders, W. H., 514 Saunders, W. L., 176 Saunterings, 123 Say, J. B., 431 Sayers, Joseph, 344 Scarecrow, the, 277 Scar-faced Charley, 160 Scarlet letter, the, 291, 582 Scenes and adventures in army life, 143 Scenes, incidents, and adventures in the Pacific ocean, 135 Schaff, Philip, 206, 207, 587 Schafmeyer
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 27: recently. (search)
on it; and, lifting his cane, he smashed the brandy bottle on the sideboard. And thus ended the long connection of the New York Tribune with the whig party. In the summer of 1852, Horace Greeley performed the melancholy duty of finishing Sargent's Life of Henry Clay. He added little, however, to Mr. Sargent's narrative, except the proceedings of Congress on the occasion of Mr. Clay's death and funeral. One paragraph, descriptive of the last interview between the dying statesman and thMr. Sargent's narrative, except the proceedings of Congress on the occasion of Mr. Clay's death and funeral. One paragraph, descriptive of the last interview between the dying statesman and the editor of the Tribune, claims insertion: Learning from others, says Mr. Greeley, how ill and feeble he was, I had not intended to call upon him, and remained two days under the same roof without asking permission to do so. Meantime, however, he was casually informed of my being in Washington, and sent me a request to call at his room. I did so, and enjoyed a half hour's free and friendly conversation with him, the saddest and the last! his state was even worse than I feared; he was alrea
d over on Charlestown and Causeway streets, Jan. 22, 1847 Damrell & Moore's Printing House burned, Mar. 10, 1848 Albany and Hudson streets, conflagration, July 12, 1848 Tremont Temple, Tremont street, burned, Mar. 31, 1852 National Theatre, Portland street, burned, Apr. 26, 1852 Chickering's Building, Washington street, burned, Dec. 2, 1852 Johnson's Block, Commercial street, burned, Nov. 2, 1853 Pemberton House, Howard street, burned, May 16, 1854 Several vessels at Sargent's wharf, burned, Apr. 27, 1855 Gerrish Market, Portland street, burned, Apr. 12, 1856 Jefferson's Block, North street, and nine persons burned, July 29, 1856 East Boston Flour Mills, burned, Sep. 22, 1856 House and two children on Stillman street, burned, May 20, 1857 Several houses on Federal street, burned, May 2, 1858 Mechanical Bakery, Commercial street, burned, Feb. 6, 1859 Flour Mills, on Eastern Avenue, burned, Apr. 2, 1859 Westboroa Reform School buildings, b
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