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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
of our early and faithful laborers in this cause as there was in that remote country, among comparative strangers (Speech of H. W. Beecher at Third Decade Meeting, Philadelphia, Dec. 4, 1863; Lib. 34: 5). But to return to this side of the water, and to the American Anti-Slavery Society: W. L. Garrison to his wife. New York, May 14, 1863. Ms. Our anti-slavery company was never so small before, with reference to Anniversary week. It consisted of Edmund Quincy, May 11. John T. Sargent, and myself—Phillips having preceded us in the night train, in order to be fresh for his Cooper Institute speech Monday evening. At Worcester, Mr. May and his S. May, Jr. mother joined us, and these were all the recognized Mary May. abolitionists in that long and crowded train. What then? It must be now that the kingdom's coming, And the year of jubilo and our distinctive movement is nearly swallowed up in the great revolution in Northern sentiment which has been going on against
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
ral of our old anti-slavery Dec. 26. co-laborer, Charles Lenox Remond, at Greenwood. He had Mass. been wasting in consumption for the last eighteen months. John T. Sargent, Wendell Phillips, and myself conducted the services. A number of white and colored friends from Salem and Boston were present. Yesterday forenoon, I wasven yet I feel a sensation of satisfaction, at the times and seasons when they used to occur, to think that I have not to go to them. I told John Sargent Rev. John T. Sargent. the other day that I wished they That is, the American and Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Societies after 1865, of which latter Mr. Sargent was President. Mr. Sargent was President. In this capacity he expressed the hope that Quincy would freely visit the Anti-Slavery Office. as of old, before the separation. Thank you, answered the wit; I'm afraid of ghosts. could have kept on abolishing Slavery for the rest of their natural lives, it was such a pleasure to me to know they were at it, and I having nothing