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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
torn up, and eight large anchors which were found on the wharf near by were placed on the barricade. A car loaded with sand attempted to pass, but was seized by the rioters, who backed it up to the barricade, and emptied the sand on the pile of stones and anchors. A large number of negroes were working on the wharves at the time. These were ordered to quit work, which they did with alacrity, and were directed by the rioters to assist them on the barricade. They complied and, as Colonel J. Thomas Scharf, in his Chronicles of Baltimore relates, worked away with a will for Massa Jeff Davis and de Souf. At this stage of the proceedings Mayor Brown, who had hurried from Camden Station, arrived on the scene. What followed is best given in Mayor Brown's own words: On arriving at the head of Smith's wharf, he says in his official report, I found that anchors had been piled on the track to obstruct it, and Sergeant McComas and a few policemen, who were with him, were not allowed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland troops in the Confederate service. (search)
orgotten in the day of action. By order of General Joseph E. Johnston. W. H. Whiting, Inspector-General. General G. T. Beauregard, in his letter to Mr. J. Thomas Scharf under date of November 5th, 1873, published in the Baltimore Chronicle, thus speaks of the First Maryland's participation in the battle of the first Manasslion of Breckinridge's command immediately drove the enemy out with severe loss. General Breckinridge also, in a letter dated January 6th, 1874, and published in Scharf's Chronicles of Baltimore, thus mentions the Second Maryland's participation in the battle of Cold Harbor: When I crossed over from the Shenandoah Valley in May, idered, it will be seen that Maryland did her duty as well as could have been expected with her surroundings, and as Mr. Jefferson Davis in a letter, published in Scharf's Chronicles of Baltimore, says, the world will accord to them peculiar credit, as it always has done to those who leave their hearthstones to fight for principle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), President Davis in reply to General Sherman. (search)
f Sherman to produce the proof. The following letter, published in the Baltimore Sun, is not only an able and unanswerable reply to Sherman, but contains other matter which should have a place in our records, and be handed down for the use of the future historian. No wonder that General Sherman has thrown himself back on his dignity(?!), and declined to reply to this terrible but deserved excoriation.] The letter of Mr. Davis. Beauvoir, Mississippi, September 23, 1886. Colonel J. Thomas Scharf, Baltimore, Maryland: my dear Sir—At various times and from many of my friends, I have been asked to furnish a reply to General W. T. Sherman's so-called report to the War Department, and which the United States Senate ordered to be printed as Ex. Doc. No. 36, Forty-eighth Congress, second session. I have been compelled by many causes to postpone my reply to these invitations, and have in some instances declined, for the time being, to undertake the labor. A continuing sense o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland Confederate monument at Gettysburg. (search)
ert, son of General Herbert, and J. Duncan McKim, son of Rev. Dr. Randolph H. McKim; General George H. Steuart and staff-officers; Lieutenant Randolph H. McKim, chief of staff; Lieutenant McHenry Howard, Colonel W. S. Symington, Colonel H. Kyd Douglass, Captain Frederick M. Colston, Captain Frank Markoe, Captain John Donnell Smith, Private George C. Jenkins, Lieutenant Fielder C. Slingluff, Private Gresham Hough, Captain J. S. Maury, Midshipman John T. Mason, Captain C. M. Morris, Midshipman J. Thomas Scharf, Private Spencer C. Jones, Corporal Robert M. Blundon, Sergeant William H. Pope, Private George T. Hollyday, Captain John B. Brown; the Second Maryland regiment; First Maryland Cavalry; a carriage containing Captain George Thomas, the orator of the day; Mr. Ridgely Howard and friends; the Maryland Line, Society of the Army and Navy, and other organizations. Nearly one thousand persons were in line. The veterans marched to the music of Latchford's Drum Corps, composed of sons of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Virginia, or Merrimac: her real projector. (search)
essary, to diminish it. Extracts from these three letters of Mr. Porter will be found in J. Thomas Scharf's History of the Confederate States Navy, published in 1887, pp. 146-151. The last in order is the extract from a private letter, given above, which, Mr. Scharf says, was published in the Charleston Mercury of April 8th, 1862. Knowing that this extract, the first publication connectin The order of date of publication of the three extracts from Mr. Porter's letters is reversed in Scharf's history. My note-book, kept at that time, contains, under date of March 20th, 1862, this remas publications by the Secretary or myself. I may here recall the fact before mentioned, that in Scharf's History of the Confederate States Navy, the true order of date of these publications has been information. In Flag-officer Tattnall's triumphant defence will be found this statement [see Scharf's Confederate States Navy, p. 235]: To the constructor, Mr. Porter, I applied through Payma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
al Steuart, and it was through their aid and the kindness of Captain Ellett and Major Brander that the Marylanders, who arrived after the column started, were able to get their position in the line. Among the prominent Marylanders who were in the party were: Colonel Thomas S. Rhett, State-Treasurer Spencer C. Jones, Rev. William M. Dame, Mr. and Mrs. Stacey P. Bispham and Mrs. James G. Wiltshire (the ladies being the neices of General A. P. Hill), Hugh McWilliams, R. M. Chambers, Colonel J. Thomas Scharf, William J. Scharf, Dr. J. G. Heusler, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Carter and Miss Carter, Captain and Mrs. R. P. H. Staub and two daughters, William J. Biedler, Captain Adolph Elhart, and S. A. Kennedy, passenger agent of the Pennsylvania railroad. An interesting incident in connection with the attendance of Generals Heth and Steuart at the unveiling of the monument is the fact that they and General Hill were fellow-cadets at West Point Military Academy. General Heth was senior major-gen