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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
e valley of the south branch of the Potomac, ascending this valley toward the south, picking up Schenck's and Milroy's brigades in turn, the latter joining the column at Monterey, on the great watersd Milroy at McDowell West Virginia. on the 8th, and the latter calling upon Fremont for help, Schenck was sent forward to support him, who reached McDowell, having marched 34 miles in 24 hours. Jacrated his forces, and the Union generals held their ground and delivered a sharp combat, General Schenck in his report says: A little observation served to show at once that McDowell, as a defnds numbered 256, while the Confederate loss was 498, General Johnson being among the wounded. Schenck as senior assumed the command, and on the 9th began his retreat to Franklin, abandoning the Chen it should approach Christiansburg. Instead of this we got news of Jackson's movements and of Schenck's and Milroy's retreat, and Fremont was obliged to telegraph that his plans were suspended, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
ndicate Jackson's movements in the Valley. On May 6th he was at Staunton; he fought Milroy and Schenck near McDowell on May 8th; Banks at Front Royal, Newtown, and Winchester on May 23d, 24th, and 2was on the Staunton and Parkersburg road at McDowell, less than forty miles from Staunton, with Schenck's brigade of about 2500 near Franklin. The rest of Fremont's army in the mountain department wp of the Bull Pasture Mountain, three miles east of McDowell, encountered Milroy reinforced by Schenck, who commanded by virtue of seniority of commission. The conflict lasted several Union campnd bloody. It was fought mainly with small-arms, the ground forbidding much use of artillery. Schenck and Milroy fled precipitately toward Franklin, to unite with Fremont. The route lay along a na and then fell back to the Valley on the Warm Springs and Harrisonburg road. See note by General Schenck, p. 298, and also p. 280.--Editors. The morning after the battle of McDowell I called v
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on the battle of McDowell. (search)
Notes on the battle of McDowell. I.by Robert C. Schenck, Major-General U. S. V. On the 7th of May I left Franklin with about 2000 men to join and support General Milroy, menaced with attack by Stonewall Jackson, near McDowell, about forty miles distant. During this forced march my troops made the remarkable time of 34 miles in 23 hours. When I arrived, on the morning of the 8th, I found Milroy, with his small force in the village at the foot of the mountain, defending himself against the enemy occupying the heights above, shut in, in fact, in a sort of amphitheater. The only easy escape from the position was down the narrow valley and small stream back by the road by which I had arrived. I, of course, assumed the command by right of seniority. The only question was how best to extricate ourselves from this disadvantageous position in the presence of a force of the enemy largely superior in numbers. My whole force, after my arrival at McDowell and junction with Milroy, was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I. (search)
I.by Robert C. Schenck, Major-General U. S. V. On the 7th of May I left Franklin with about 2000 men to join and support General Milroy, menaced with attack by Stonewall Jackson, near McDowell, about forty miles distant. During this forced march my troops made the remarkable time of 34 miles in 23 hours. When I arrived, on the morning of the 8th, I found Milroy, with his small force in the village at the foot of the mountain, defending himself against the enemy occupying the heights above, shut in, in fact, in a sort of amphitheater. The only easy escape from the position was down the narrow valley and small stream back by the road by which I had arrived. I, of course, assumed the command by right of seniority. The only question was how best to extricate ourselves from this disadvantageous position in the presence of a force of the enemy largely superior in numbers. My whole force, after my arrival at McDowell and junction with Milroy, was but about 4000 men. General Milro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
infantry, a cavalry force of 750, and 24 pieces of artillery. Forces at McDowell, Va., May 8th, 1862. Brigadier-General Robert C. Schenck. Milroy's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert H. Milroy: 25th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. W. P. Richardson; 52d Ohio, Lieuattery, Capt. Aaron C. Johnson; 1st W. Va. Cav. (3 co's), Maj. John S. Krepps. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 177; m, 2 = 199. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John LBrig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John L. Zeigler; 1st Battalion Conn. Cav., Maj. Judson M. Lyon; K, 1st Ohio Art'y, Capt. William L. De Beck. Brigade loss (82d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Recorn; 12th Ohio Battery, Capt. Aaron C. Johnson. Brigade loss: k, 23; w, 122; m, 14 = 159. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert C. Schenck: 32d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Ebenezer H. Swinney; 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 73d Ohio, Col. Orland Smith; 75th Ohi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
infantry, a cavalry force of 750, and 24 pieces of artillery. Forces at McDowell, Va., May 8th, 1862. Brigadier-General Robert C. Schenck. Milroy's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert H. Milroy: 25th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. W. P. Richardson; 52d Ohio, Lieuattery, Capt. Aaron C. Johnson; 1st W. Va. Cav. (3 co's), Maj. John S. Krepps. Brigade loss: k, 20; w, 177; m, 2 = 199. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John LBrig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John L. Zeigler; 1st Battalion Conn. Cav., Maj. Judson M. Lyon; K, 1st Ohio Art'y, Capt. William L. De Beck. Brigade loss (82d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Recorn; 12th Ohio Battery, Capt. Aaron C. Johnson. Brigade loss: k, 23; w, 122; m, 14 = 159. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert C. Schenck: 32d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Ebenezer H. Swinney; 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 73d Ohio, Col. Orland Smith; 75th Ohi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
ccupied the right of our line toward Sudley Springs. Sigel was on his left, with his line extending a short distance south of the Warrenton pike, the division of Schenck occupying the high ground to the left (south) of the pike. The extreme left was held by Reynolds. Reno's corps had reached the field and the most of it had beenh severe loss, but he returned again and again to the assault. It is needless for me to describe the appearance of a man so well known to the country as General R. C. Schenck. I have only to say that a more gallant and devoted soldier never lived, and to his presence and the fearless exposure of his person during these attacks command of the Army of Virginia that General Buford, then only a major in the inspector-general's department, reported to me for duty as inspector. Major-General Robert C. Schenck. From a photograph. I asked him how he could possibly remain in such a position while a great war was going on, and what objections he could have
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Army of Virginia.--Major-General John Pope. Staff loss: m, 2. Escort: A and C, 1st Ohio Cav., Capt. Nathan D. Menken. Loss: w, 1; m, 20=21. first Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Franz Sigel. Escort: 1st Ind. Cav. (2 co's), Capt. Abram Sharra. Loss: w, 1; m, 1 =2. first division, Brig.-Gen. Robert C. Schenck(w), Brig.-Gen. Julius Stahel. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Julius Stahel, Col. Adolphus Buschbeck: 8th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Carl B. Hedterich; 41st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Ernest W. Holmstedt; 45th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edward C. Wratislaw; 27th Pa., Col. Adolphus Buschbeck, Lieut.-Col. Lorenz Cantador; 2d N. Y. Battery, Capt. Louis Schirmer, Lieut. F. J. T. Blume. Brigade loss (incomplete): k, 40; w, 96; in, 33=169. Second Brigade, Col. Nathaniel C. McLean: 25th Ohio, Co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The time of Longstreet's arrival at Groveton. (search)
veral wounded comrades. ... I made use of a broken musket as a crutch, and was well on my way to the shelter of the trees, when some one called out: Throw down that gun. It was not until the order had been repeated that I was aware it was addressed to me. Looking round, I saw a company of the enemy's cavalry approaching. I dropped the gun, and they rode up and claimed us as prisoners. A few of the Confederates remained with us nearly two hours, and were then compelled to retire before Schenck's skirmishers, who passed through the woods, and remained west of us, possibly thirty minutes, when they in turn retired whence they came, followed by those of the enemy, with whom they exchanged a few shots. The enemy's skirmishers passed down the pike and through the field south of it, followed by the 2d Mississippi, of Hood's division, which halted a few yards east of us. The enemy now began to arrive in force, and occupied the woods. Hood's troops remained here from 11 A. M. until nea