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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 66 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 60 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 20 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 12 4 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 11 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 2 Browse Search
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John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, I. The tocsin of war. (search)
land, who so promptly pressed forward and touched elbows with her in this emergency; nor of those other great Western States, whose sturdy patriots so promptly crossed Mason's and Dixon's line in such serried ranks at the summons of Father Abraham. It has often been asked how Massachusetts, so much farther from the National Capital than any of the other States, should have been so prompt in coming to its assistance. Let me give some idea of how it happened. In December, 1860, Adjutant-General Schouler of that State, in his annual report, suggested to Governor (afterwards General) N. P. Banks, that as events were then occurring which might require that the militia of Massachusetts should be increased in number, it would be well for The minute man of ‘61. commanders of companies to forward to Headquarters a complete roll of each company, with their names and residence, and that companies not full should be recruited to the limit fixed by law, which was then one hundred and one f
tiss, Benjamin M., 301 Preston, N. D., 139 Rations, 108-42,206,226,291,320 Readville, Mass., 44-45 Reams Station, Va., 208,325-27 Revere Copper Company, 270 Reynolds, Thomas, 307 Richmond, 57, 139, 198, 230, 286, 313,320,358,364,391 Rip Raps, Va., 156, 162 Robertson's Tavern, Va., 134, 307 Rome, Ga., 400 Roxbury, Mass., 37-38,270 Saint Augustine, Fl., 248 Saint Louis, Mo., 279 Savannah, Ga., 384 Sawtelle, Charles G., 355 Sayler's Creek, Va, 293 Schouler, William, 23 Scott, Winfield, 23,250,252 Seneca, Md., 404 Sheridan, Philip H., 139, 267,293, 372 Sherman, William T., 239-40,246, 263,286,353-54,362,364,366, 384,400,403-4,406 Shiloh, 301,405 Shirks, 101-5,167,175,312 Sibley, Henry, 46-47 Sick call, 172-76 Sickles, Daniel E., 157,406 Smith, Andrew J., 263 Smith, E. Kirby, 160 Soldier's Aid Society, 85 Songs: Abraham's Daughter, 215; The battle Cry of freedom, 38, 42,335; Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean, 38,335; De
ce can loudly enough proclaim the debt which our country, human liberty, and civilization itself owe to these noble men of the West, who have met the angriest torrents of the rebellion and rolled its waves lack upon their depths. The heart of every son of Massachusetts leaps to salute them and do them homage. Major-General Andrews, commanding First Division, is charged with the execution of this order. By command of His Excellency John A. Andrew, Governor and commander-in-chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. By command of Major-General Halleck: N. H. McLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Third Division, Huntsville, April 20, 1862. Major-General Buell: Your order to burn the Bridgeport Bridge is received. A regiment of infantry and a company of cavalry now occupy Bellefonte, 10 miles this side of Stevenson. I destroyed a bridge 6 miles east of Stevenson myself, and on the following day or night the enemy destroyed two bridges, the one at Stevenson,
tion of the country, and of the determination of the South to make war. The rebels opened fire on Fort Sumter. Gen. William Schouler, who was the first adjutant-general appointed by Governor Andrew, and who remained in that office during the war,wn a threatened negro insurrection. Of that I shall speak hereafter more at length. In consequence of this antagonism, Schouler makes no mention of any efforts of myself or my friend, Colonel Jones, to put the troops in perfect order, or to have anhat I did or tried to do before that date in aiding to prepare Massachusetts and her troops for the war. Of course, Mr. Schouler ex industria omits all reference to me, except to state the fact that I was detailed as brigadier-general to command t So that it is a matter of history that I took part in all that was done to have Massachusetts ready for the war, and Schouler did all he could to-have those facts forgotten. On the 15th of April, Cameron, Secretary of War, sent a requisition b
ers, Lieutenant, afterwards admiral at Annapolis, 195. Roman, Lieutenant, repulses enemy, 649. Rosecrans, reference to, 877. Ruce, Major, surrender at Fort Fisher, 795. Ruffin, George L., Esq., judge of Charlestown, Mass., 974. Ruggles' Brigade at Baton Rouge, 481. S Salisbury, great loss of life in prison pen at, 609-610. Salem Zouaves, 190,195. Sanford, Major-General Butler's disagreement with, 757-758. Savannah blockade runners, enter harbor, 849. Schouler, Gen., William, misrepresents Butler, 168-169. Scotch Irish in New Hampshire, 37, 40, 44. Scott, Winfield, introduction to, 127; concedes right of secession, 142; sends despatch to Colonel Jones in Baltimore, 180; disciplines Lieutenant-Colonel Keyes, 206; assigns Butler to Department of Annapolis, 207; orders grand review of troops on February 22, 1861, 217, 218; consultation with, 222, 225; instructions from, 226-227; rebukes Butler for seizing Baltimore, 235, 239; assigns Butler to Fortre
These flags (with the consent of the Honorable House of Representatives) will be conspicuously displayed in the Hall of the House, and will there remain in the care of the Quartermaster General, until further orders. The Adjutant-General will cause a copy of this order to be transmitted to the commanders of each of the regiments and batteries of artillery now at the seat of war from this Commonwealth. By order of His Excellency, John A. Andrew, Governor and Commander-in-Chief. William Schouler, Adjutant-General. Official report of Com. Lynch, C. S. N. Flag-Ship Sea Bird, off Roanoke Island, February 7, 1862. sir: I have the honor to report that the enemy, at ten A. M. to-day, with twenty-two heavy steamers and one tug, made an attack upon this squadron and the battery at Pork Point. As his numerical force was overwhelming, we commenced the action at long range, but as our shells fell short, while his burst over and around us, (owing, I think, to the superior q
d our point fully, and with but little loss, notwithstanding the strong opposition. Our men have done all that could be desired. The affair was partially decided by two guns that Capt. Dusenbury brought gallantly into action under very difficult circumstances. The enemy was driven from his camps in front of this, and all is now quiet. G. B. McClellan, Major-General Commanding. Report of Colonel Cowdin. headquarters First regiment mass. Vols., camp at Fair Oaks, Va., June 26. Wm. Schouler, Adj.-Gen. of Massachusetts: General: In accordance with orders from the Brigade-General commanding the First brigade, I left my camp at Fair Oaks yesterday morning, and proceeded with.my command to the front into the fallen timber, where I deployed the regiment as skirmishers, throwing out advanced pickets in front of my line, and supported by the remainder of the brigade, advanced for the purpose of driving in the enemy's pickets and advancing our lines of main pickets through a swa
Massachusetts volunteers, for his activity in searching for our wounded, and his devotion to them when found. His labors only ended on our abandonment of the field. To Capt. Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieuts. Lawrence and Candler, Aids-de-Camp, I tender my sincere thanks for their services. Very respectfully, etc., Joseph Hooker, Brig.-General Commanding Division. Official report of Colonel Cowdin. headquarters First Massachusetts volunteers, July 11, 1862. William Schouler, Adjutant-General of Massachusetts: sir: I make to you the following report of the part taken in the battle of Nelson's Farm, near White Oak swamp, by the regiment under my command, Monday, June thirtieth: During the action, I was ordered to charge on the enemy in. front, at considerable distance, which I did, passing over a fence, across a field, and through the woods, the rebels falling back before us. We still advanced through an open field. Here we advanced in line of battle
t of killed and wounded will, I fear, be considerably increased as the reports from the companies are corrected. Several of the non-commissioned officers and privates were conspicuous for coolness and good conduct in action. Their names will be published as soon as a perfect list can be made. Respectfully, your ob't servant, Geo. L. Andrews, Colonel Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. headquarters Second regiment mass. Vols., camp near Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Wm. Schouler, Adjutant-General Massachusetts: sir: I have the honor to forward to you the following list of killed and wounded and missing from this regiment in the action of August ninth, near Cedar Mountain, Va.: field-officers.--Wounded, Major Savage; taken prisoner. regimental Staff.--Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly in the head. band.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C.
t of killed and wounded will, I fear, be considerably increased as the reports from the companies are corrected. Several of the non-commissioned officers and privates were conspicuous for coolness and good conduct in action. Their names will be published as soon as a perfect list can be made. Respectfully, your ob't servant, Geo. L. Andrews, Colonel Second Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. headquarters Second regiment mass. Vols., camp near Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862. Brigadier-General Wm. Schouler, Adjutant-General Massachusetts: sir: I have the honor to forward to you the following list of killed and wounded and missing from this regiment in the action of August ninth, near Cedar Mountain, Va.: field-officers.--Wounded, Major Savage; taken prisoner. regimental Staff.--Surgeon Leland, wounded slightly in the head. band.--Smeath and Rawson, missing. killed and wounded.--Company A--Killed: Capt. Abbott, Sergt. E. B. Whitten, Corp. J. C. Bassett, privates H. C.
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