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John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 8 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1864., [Electronic resource], Death of an American student in Germany. (search)
s. A standard writer on the Military Art states that, as a general rule, troops marching for many days in succession will move at the rate of from fifteen to twenty miles per day. In forced marches, or in pursuit of a flying enemy, they will average from twenty to twenty-five miles per day; and for only two or three days successively, with favorable roads, thirty miles per day may be calculated on.--The author mentions the following instances of rapid marches: The Roman infantry, in Scipio's African campaigns, frequently marched twenty miles in five hours, each soldier carrying from fifty to eighty pounds of baggage. Septimus Severus marched from Vienna to Rome, a distance of eight hundred miles, in forty days. C├Žsar marched from Rome to the Sierra Morena, in Spain, a distance of four hundred and fifty leagues, twenty- three days. The French, for general activity during a campaign, have no rivals. In 1797, Napoleon, in less than four days, marched near fifty leagues, fo