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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 28 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 20 2 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 2 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 2 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
to Barboursville by way of Big Creek Gap, and the army was preceded by 900 cavalry under Colonel John S. Scott. General Smith had at first contemplated cutting off the supplies of the garrison at Cumngton was commenced. On the evening of the 29th, having reached Madison County, Kentucky, Colonel Scott found the enemy about half way between the small village of Kingston and the town of Richmonfusillade lasted a few moments, when the Federal army again retreated. Early in the morning Colonel Scott had been sent to gain the rear of the town. His arrival at this moment increased the dismay of September the greater portion of the army remained in that vicinity. On September 4th Colonel Scott, with a brigade of cavalry, was ordered to push on as near as practicable to Louisville, andhalmers, with Bragg's advance, reached Munfordville at daylight on the 14th and learned that Colonel Scott, with a cavalry brigade, had demanded the surrender on the night previous. The post was c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.15 (search)
This column will advance in three lines, with such intervals as you may judge proper, this movement to be covered by a heavy line of skirmishers in front and on both flanks. You will hold another division in readiness to advance in support of this movement to be formed in the same manner as the leading division. Particular care and precaution must be taken to prevent collision with our own troops in the fog. The movement will not commence until you receive orders. The watchword will be, Scott! Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, J. H. Taylor, Chief of Staff and Assistant Adjutant-General. P. S. The major-general thinks that, as Howard's division led into the town, it is proper that one of the others take the advance. French was at once directed to prepare his division in three brigade lines for the advance, and Hancock was to follow with his division in the same order. The distance between the brigade lines was to be about 200 yards. Toward 10 o'clock t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., General Hancock and the artillery at Gettysburg. (search)
be exercised subject to the established principles for the government of armies. Under these, commanders of special arms issue their own orders direct to their subordinates serving with army corps, who must submit them to the corps commanders with whom they serve. The latter, being supreme on their own lines, can modify or countermand these orders, but by doing so they make themselves responsible for the result. Thus all conflicts or theories as to authority are avoided. Our Regulations (Scott's), adopted in 1821, read: The superior officer of the corps of engineers, or of the artillery, serving with one of the army corps . . . will receive the orders of the commandant thereof, to whom the said superior officer of engineers or of artillery will communicate any orders he may receive from his own particular commandant-in-chief, attached to general headquarters. Separate paragraphs provided rules for the military staff and administration,--the latter including the supply depa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
. Walker; 24th Tenn., Col. J. A. Wilson; 31st Tenn., Col. E. E. Tansil; 33d Tenn.,----. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 203; m, 28 == 250. Artillery, Maj. Melancthon Smith: Tenn. Battery, Capt. W. W. Carnes; Ga. Battery, Capt. John Scogin; Tenn. Battery (Scott's), Lieut. J. H. Marsh (w), Lieut. A. T. Watson; Miss. Battery (Smith's), Lieut. W. B. Turner; Miss. Bat'y, Capt. T. J. Stanford. Hill's Corps, Lieut.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Cleburne's division, Maj.-Gen. P. R. Cleburne. Wood's Brigade, Brivision (composition of division uncertain). Brig.-Gen. John Pegram. Davidson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. H. B. Davidson: 1st Ga.,----; 6th Ga., Col. John R. Hart; 6th N. C.,----; Rucker's Legion,----; Tenn. Battery (Huwald's). Scott's Brigade, Col. J. S. Scott: 10th Confederate, Col. C. T. Goode; Detachment of Morgan's command, Lieut.-Col. R. M. Martin; 1st La.,----; 2d Tenn.,----; 5th Tenn.,----; 12th Tenn. Battalion,----; 16th Tenn. Battalion, Capt. J. Q. Arnold (w); La. Battery (section),----.
March 9, 1862.-skirmish on Granny White's Pike, near Nashville, Tenn. Report of Col. John S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry. Hdqrs. First Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, Columbia, March 10, 1862. Sir: On yesterday morning a detachment of 40 men from my regiment, under command of Capt. G. A. Scott, of Company E, met a body of the enemy, consisting of two companies and numbering about 100 men, on the Granny White's Pike, 6 miles from Nashville. A skirmish ensued, in which we killed 12 oest encampment appears to be on the Charlotte Pike, where they appear to have large means of land transportation, such as wagons, mules, &c. With a small addition to my force I think they could be prevented from marauding to any great extent. If furnished with sacks, a good deal of corn, wheat, &c., could be sent out of this country within the next ten days. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry. General A. Sidney Johnston, Huntsville, Ala.
n force, by virtue of authority with which I am vested, both by the President of the Confederate States and the Executive of the State of Virginia, I do hereby order the whole body of the militia of Virginia, resident within the counties of Lee, Scott, Wise, Grayson, Carroll, Buchanan, Russell, Washington, Smythe, Wythe and Tazewell to rendezvous immediately, fully armed and equipped, at the respective places herein designated; that is to say, the militia of Washington, Russell, Grayson, and Scott, at the Old Court, in Russell County; the militia in Lee and Wise at Guest's Station in Wise County; the militia of Buchanan, at Grundy; the militia of Smythe and Carroll, at Saltville; the militia of Wythe, at Wytheville, and the militia of Tazewell, at the mouth of Indian Creek, in Tazewell County. Colonels in command of regiments will move them by companies as rapidly as possible to the places of rendezvous hereby appointed. At such places a board of surgeons will examine and certify to
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
but in consequence of the dilatory movements of General Paine's division they were obliged to wait until dark ere they could be assigned to their positions. At dusk the major general commanding, accompanied by the Assistant Secretary of War (Scott), arrived and rode over the ground. By 9 o'clock the work of fortifying had proceeded to a considerable extent, and by daylight the next morning our works had become so formidable as to preclude any attempt by the enemy to dislodge us. May 1Ripley. At Blackland he encountered the enemy, 100 strong, whom he charged and drove in, wounding several, taking 1 prisoner, and capturing their animals, wagons, and several guns dropped by the enemy in his flight. Colonel Smith reports Sergeant-Major Scott as having been in this affair particularly distinguished for coolness and daring. June 4.-Colonel Elliott, with his brigade and four guns of Powell's battery, was sent down the Blackland road. Arriving at Osborn's Creek, he encountere
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 1-2, 1862.-operations in the vicinity of Athens, Mooresville, Limestone Bridge, and Elk River, Ala. (search)
, your obedient servant, O. M. Mitchell, Major-General, Commanding Third Division. Maj. Gen. D. C. Buell, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. No. 2.-reports of Col. J. S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry. Athens, Ala., May 1, 1862. General: I attacked the enemy this morning at this place and drove them within 6 miles of Huntsv's loss must have been 200 killed and wounded. My officers and men behaved so well that I can make no particular mention. Yours, very respectfully, J. S. Scott, Colonel First Regiment Louisiana Cavalry. General G. T. Beaueegard. P. S.-I cannot, however, close without particular mention of the gallantry of Captain f ammunition and my horses are very much jaded. I will cross to-night on the south side of the river and rest my men and horses for a few days in the neighborhood of Courtland. I send you 20 prisoners-2 captains. Yours, very respectfully, J. S. Scott, Colonel First Regiment Louisiana Oatoalry. General G. T. Beauregard.
pieces of artillery, have crossed at different points-at Lamb's Ferry and the ferry just below the shoals. Of these, Morgan's cavalry have been already heard from. Helm's cavalry are on this side of the river, having penetrated toward Elkton. Scott's cavalry, in part, are on this side of the river, and some bodies of the Texan Rangers have not been able to recross. On yesterday, while at Rogersville, I ordered an expedition to move at 12 o'clock, composed of troops of Negley's command, red 4 scouts, 2 of whom belonged to the First Kentucky. A portion of the enemy, estimated to be over 900, upon leaving here, took the Elk River road; between 200 and 300 took the road leading to Florence. The others fled in every direction. Scott's cavalry and transportation train crossed the river on the 12th. The rebel force which had been concentrated at this point consisted of seven regiments and battalions of cavalry, under command of Colonel (Acting Brigadier-General) Adams, numbe
. 2.-reports of Brig.. Genl. James S. Neyley, U. S. Army. headquarters U. S. Forces, Before Chattanooga, Tenn., June 7, 1862-10 a. m. Sir: Yesterday morning moved Colonel Sills command direct to Shell Mound, to divert the enemy opposite that point; also prevent them from crossing. Colonel Sill found two pieces of artillery in position and opened upon it without reply. As I expected, they threw heavy re-enforcements to that point lastnight expecting the attack to be made there. Colonel Scott and Captain Shaeffer's Pennsylvania cavalry were sent from Jasper by a path through the mountain, which resulted in surprising and capturing the enemy's pickets at the ferry and preventing the further retreat of Adams' men over the river. My main force came by Anderson's road. Colonel Scribner's command is occupying an important point, which I omit alluding to, except by saying that it is for the benefit of Starnes and his cavalry, who are now at Altamont. We captured a large numbe
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