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Brigadier-General. 32dArkansasRegimentInfantryCol. L. C. Gause   1stArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor W. H. Brooks   2dArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor W. D. Barnett   3dArkansasBattalionInfantry    4thArkansasBattalionInfantryLt. Col. Masson   5thArkansasBattalionInfantry    6thArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor D. G. White   7thArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor F. W. Desha   8thArkansasBattalionInfantry    9thArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor John H. Kelley   10thArkansasBattalionInfantryLt. Col. R. Scott   11thArkansasBattalionInfantryMajor Trumbull   1stSeminole IndiansBattalionInfantryLt. Col. Jumper   1stFioridaRegimentCavalryCol. G. T. MaxwellNov. 4, 1862.  Col. W. G. M. Davis1861.Promoted Brigadier-General. 2dFioridaRegimentCavalryCol. Carraway SmithNov. 4, 1862.  1stFloridaRegimentInfantryCol. W. K. Beard   2dFloridaRegimentInfantryCol. L. G. PylesNov. 22, 1862.  Col. E. A. Perry1861.Promoted Brigadier-General. 3dFloridaRegimentInfantryCol. W.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
hott, John A. H., priv., (E), Dec. 6, ‘64; 26; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Schmidt, Chas., priv., (A), Jan. 8, ‘64; 25; wounded May 10, ‘64; vet. 22nd N. J. Vols. disch. June 17, ‘65; pris. from May 12, ‘64, to May 12, ‘65. Schnock, Albert, priv., (I), Jan. 26, ‘65; 22; disch. July 28, ‘65. Schultz, Hans W., priv., (—), July 31, ‘63; 31; sub.; N. F.R. Schulze, Frederick, priv., (B), Dec. 30, ‘64; 24; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Schwerin, Fritz, priv., (—), July 31, ‘63; 27; sub. John W. Bryant; N. F.R. Scott, John, priv., (—), May 24, ‘64; 32; sub.; abs. pris.; captured June 22, ‘64; not heard from since. Seaman, John, priv., (H), June 10, ‘64; 21; sub. Marshall Calkins; disch. disa. Sept. 16, ‘64. Seaver, Joseph, priv., (B), Sept. 2, ‘62; 44; killed in action Dec. 14, ‘62; Fredericksburg, Va. Seavey, Joseph J., priv., (F), Aug. 6, ‘61; 27; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Suley, Samuel W., capt's boy, (G), Aug. 23, ‘61; 16; N. F.R. Scic
or General Wool, by whom General Butler is succeeded, is a veteran officer of the regular army, and undoubtedly a man of courage and experience. But he must be now nearly seventy-five years of age, and it seemed to be the opinion of the late General Scott, that he is too infirm for active service. Possibly General Wool may entertain the same opinion of General Scott. But if he does not take warning by the fate of the latter, and shut himself up closely in his fortress, they will soon be brothwhom General Butler is succeeded, is a veteran officer of the regular army, and undoubtedly a man of courage and experience. But he must be now nearly seventy-five years of age, and it seemed to be the opinion of the late General Scott, that he is too infirm for active service. Possibly General Wool may entertain the same opinion of General Scott. But if he does not take warning by the fate of the latter, and shut himself up closely in his fortress, they will soon be brothers in affliction.
[for the Richmond Dispatch] Hener to whom Hener is Due. To the Editors of the Dispatch: Permit me to correct an error in a communication in your Friday's issue, over the signature "Palmetto." He says: "Two South Carolina Regiments, with Kemper's battery and a detachment of "The Black Horse," pursued the enemy for six miles, capturing 20 pieces of artillery and arms, and stores innumerable. "--I would in no way detract from that efficient and well known company, the "Black Horse," but I must claim for "the Albemarle Light Horse," led an by that gallant and dashing officer, Major Scott, the honor awarded to the Black Horse of that perilous and important action. The Albemarle Light Horse volunteered at the suggestion of Major Mill. The detachment of the Black Horse was the reinforcement brought up by Lieutenant Randolph. Albemarle
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], List of wounded men in General Hospital, Charlottesville, Va. (search)
ttalion, E — knee, not severe. Rutledge G R, 27th Virginia--shoulder. Sergeant W, 27th Virginia, company E--arm, slight. Strickler Cyrus, 4th Virginia, I — died July 27th. Saunders Hiram, 4th Virginia, C — leg off, very severe. Scott J N. 7th Georgia, D — knee, severe. Scott W M, 4th Alabama, H — arm broke, not severe. Segrist J W, 4th Alabama, B — internal Hurt, not severe. Sellers Samuel. Corporal 8th S Carolina, C — foot, severe. Sergeant W, 2d MississippiScott W M, 4th Alabama, H — arm broke, not severe. Segrist J W, 4th Alabama, B — internal Hurt, not severe. Sellers Samuel. Corporal 8th S Carolina, C — foot, severe. Sergeant W, 2d Mississippi, B — breast. Sidies W a, Staunton Artillery--leg broken, very severe. Sharp W S, 7th Georgia, a — leg, not very bad. Shanklin C. A, 27th Virginia, D — hand, not severe. Silby, Wm H, 4th Virginia, H — forehead, slight. Simmons Joseph C, 2d Virginia, D — thigh, severe. Singleton W F, Pendleton Artillery — arm, slight. Skellet, Lieutenant 2d Mississippi, D--3 ribs broken. Smith, 4th Alabama, D — foot. Stephen W C, 17th Mississippi, H
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource], The twenty-seventh Virginia Regiment. (search)
Regiment. This regiment was commanded by Lieut. Col. Echols in the battle of Manassas, Col. Gordon being detained by illness. It was one of the regiments which made the forced march from Winchester, and there were only about three hundred of the whole number engaged in the fight; and out of these gallant three hundred, over one hundred were killed and wounded — a mortality scarcely known in the history of war. The following is the list: Of the "Greenbrier Rifles," W. H. Callison. R. Scott, C. McShehon, and Michael Bowen, were killed. J. W. Gilkeson, W. H. Bouner, D. H. Bell, J. Callicon, J. W. A. Ford, G. W. Harper, Thomas Henry, L. H. Johnson, M. McMahon, Thos. Peyton and Wm. Sergeant, were wounded. Joseph W Gilkeson died from his wounds on the 25th ult. Of the "Monroe Guards," Capt. Hugh S Tiffany, Robert Hamilton, Arch Campbell, RoCamp, Wiley Wisfield and John Conner were killed. Lieut Joseph G Wiley. C C Tiffany, David A Shanklin, G C Rutledge, John C Lynch. W
their hour of trail. Lincoln's war must carry sappiness to many domestic circles at the North, if all the domestic circles are as blood thirsty as the Administration. A responsible officer of the Mount Vernon Association emphatically denies Scott's assertion that "Mount Vernon, so recently course crated a new to the immortal Washington by the ladies of America, has already been over run by bands of rebels." Scott is a liar, as well as a traitor. The New York Journal of Commerce, anxiScott is a liar, as well as a traitor. The New York Journal of Commerce, anxious for peace, proposes an armistice for three months, and a Convention of all the States, to arrange matters. We don't think it can be done. The Grand Army marched toward Manassas with colors flying. On its return to Washington, instead of colors, the army was flying. Changing turn. "Forward to Richmond, let us fly" The Yankees shout, while blundering on, But Davis changed their battle cry To " Backward, boys, to Washington." In the recent retreat of the Federals
of chivalry and self-respect. It is positively fiendish. It must move the South to the most united, determined, and heroic resistance that the world has ever seen. My arms were not made to wear handcuffs; nor shall they, while God gives me strength to resist. I believe the thirty thousand handcuffs will be worth more than thirty thousand volunteers to the South. They must inspire the South with an everlasting loathing of the race that could plan for them a degradation so profound and galling — an injury that we cannot retaliate without sacrificing our character in the estimation of the civilized world. "Poor Scott! I learn he has been superseded Withered are his laurels. Yet he did not reach the lowest point of infamy to which he might have descended. He was, I learn, opposed to the use of the handcuffs. These new implements of war are the invention of the Republicans — Lincoln, and his saintly advisers — the great enemies of slavery. Let them have the honor of i