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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 73 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 56 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 51 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 46 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 43 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 43 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Walter Scott or search for Walter Scott in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
s, he soon gave up any ambition of this kind. He studied well such text-books as he liked, neglecting the rest. If he did not outrank others in the appointed studies, he had no rival in his devotion to miscellaneous literature. He delighted in Scott's novels, but most of all in Shakspeare, from whom he was perpetually quoting in conversation and letters. No student of his class, when he left college, had read as widely. His memory, both of thought and language, was remarkable; and he imita the Lady Marquesse of Winchester, printed in Chalmers's English Poets; Massinger's Fatal Dowry; Marston's Antonio and Mellida, and What You Will; Sir Thomas Browne's Vulgar and Common Errors; Butler's Reminiscences; Southey's Book of the Church; Scott's Stories taken from Scottish History, and his Life of Swift; and Bulwer's Paul Clifford. He enjoyed at this time the old English writers, particularly the dramatists. He wrote in his commonplace-book brief sketches (drawing the material chiefl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
f their circumstances and character. Can I assist you? I have several engagements of my pen in different quarters, but there is no one I should be so happy to serve as you. With sincere attachment, yours, Chas. Sumner. To Miss Peters, Philadelphia. Boston, Aug. 13, 1834. . . . I am glad that you are so fond of what most young ladies call dry reading,—Hume, Sallust, &c. Novels, indeed, are delightful. They are the sources of exhilaration and pleasure; and especially those of Walter Scott and Miss Edgeworth often contain much instruction, either by furnishing sketches of historical characters, or of an age, or of a remarkable event, which are thus imprinted on the attentive mind with the vividness of a picture, or by illustrating and enforcing some beautiful moral truth. Miss Edgeworth's Helen, which I have just read, is worth a score of dull sermons on this account. With what point and skill has she shown the miserable consequences of the slightest departure from truth!
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
, for one made in a sailing vessel and during the winter, was exceptionally rapid and agreeable. Journal Dec. 25. On the fourth day I was rejoiced to find myself able to read, though lying in my berth. Previously my time had passed without the relief which this at once afforded. Chancellor Kent had been kind enough to advise me to take a stock of pleasant books, and I had provided myself with some on the morning of sailing. I read the fourth and fifth parts of Lockhart's Life of Scott, James's novel of Attila, Cooper's England, and the Life of Burr, while stretched in my berth; and never were books a greater luxury: they were friends and companions where I was, in a degree, friendless and companionless. At the end of the first week I was able, with some ado, to appear at the dinner-table. I know no feeling which, in a small way, is keener than for a man disabled by the weakness rather than the nausea of sea-sickness, with his appetite returning upon him like a Bay of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
whom he played the sportsman for the first time since his college vacations; to Lord Brougham at Brougham Hall, and John Marshall at Hallsteads, on Ulleswater Lake. He enjoyed greatly some hours with Wordsworth, at Rydal Mount; but missed Southey, then absent on the Continent. From Keswick he went to Penrith, where he was for a day with Sir George Back, the Arctic voyager. Passing into Scotland, he was at Melrose the guest of Sir David Brewster. Here he conversed with companions of Sir Walter Scott, and made an excursion to Abbotsford. He was in Edinburgh nine days, meeting some of its most famous men; dining with Sir William Hamilton and Sir John Robison, Secretary of the Royal Society, enjoying the society of Jeffrey, who was assiduous in attentions, and entertained by Sir James Gibson Craig at Riccarton House. Next he visited his friend Brown at Lanfire House, Kilmarnock, and joined in the rude festivities of a Highland wedding. While lodging at an inn at Dumbarton, he passe
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
Edinburgh. At his father's house he and Sir Walter Scott became friends in boyhood, and the friendbout Melrose, noting all the spots hallowed by Scott's friendship or genius, and finally paying my supremely interesting. He told me a story of Scott and himself seeing the devil once, when they wome oysters and port wine; and assured me that Scott never saw Melrose by moonlight during all his life: and Sir David added that he had heard Scott say that twenty times. The truth was, Sir Walterted ear. Lockhart, as you are aware, asked for Scott's letters from all his correspondents. Rogerseason, many men of interest,—old companions of Scott,—and also those whose characters speak sufficiyou know all about these already. The life of Scott must have made you acquainted with Abbotsford;oing horse. There is much that is stirring in Scott. His poetry is martial music: and I always fehouse is famous as the scene of the opening of Scott's Ivanhoe. It is also supposed to have been i[10 more...]<