hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 7 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for N. J. Scott or search for N. J. Scott in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
e a great polisher, but we have never seen it, and therefore, for all the good Monsieur might have done for us, we remain in our original ursine condition. But if we have books for brides and bridegrooms, with treatises upon every manner of incoming and outgoing, incident to human life; if we have complete letter-writers and vade-mecums for all kinds of persons, why should not our ministers plenipotentiary and our embassadors extraordinary have a manual of as much authority as that of General Scott is with infantry? Why should they not be taught to go through their paces, their genuflexions, their advances and their retreats? How must we have suffered in the estimation of polite Europe for the want of such a work, to the compilation of which we do respect-fully entreat Mr. Peter Parley to devote his declining years! Might not such a volume, however elementary in,, its inculcations, have shown to John Randolph, of Roanoke, (clarum et venerable nomen!) the impropriety of approachi
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Modern Chivalry — a Manifesto. (search)
sh to spare. For cash, after all, is what Sir George will stand most in need of. To slaveholders he makes a most piteous appeal, calling upon them in the name of all that is good and great to draw their pocketbooks instantly, and to send to Col. N. J. Scott, of Auburn, Ala., the neat sum of one million five hundred thousand dollars. We are afraid that it is just possible that Col. Scott will be obliged to wait awhile for that money; and our advice to Sir George, if he really desires to be the ACol. Scott will be obliged to wait awhile for that money; and our advice to Sir George, if he really desires to be the Alexander of Mexico, is to courageously make up his mind to defray all the expenses out of his private resources, which are undoubtedly unlimited. We beg leave, most respectfully, to call the attention of our friend, Mr. Buchanan, to this Proclamation. It may divert his mind from a too constant contemplation of his recent misfortunes; and he may pleasantly employ himself during the brief remainder of his official existence, either in assisting or arresting this expedition — it really makes no
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Humanities South. (search)
The Humanities South. arms have it all their own way in the regions of renegade revolt, throughout which the toga is unceremoniously discarded. Even the Rt. Rev. Father in God, Polk, of Louisiana, as our readers already know, has discarded godly lawn for golden lace and the Lives of the Saints for Scott's Tactics. But now sadder news comes to us. The Southern colleges and universities are giving up their erudite ghosts in every direction. Upon the authority of The New Orleans True Witness, a religious sheet, we have to state with pain that Oakland College, a celebrated Haunt of the Muses, is no more — that La Grange College, a renowned Seat of Learning in Tennessee, is also defunct — that Stewart College, an Academic Grove in Tennessee, has also been cut down in the full foliage of its usefulness — that the University of Mississippi, at Oxford, is sitting like a bereaved mother, with nobody at her generous bosom; and that the Centenary College, at Jackson, La., no longer dispe<