Your search returned 33 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Jennings Wise: Captain of the Blues (search)
, from Currituck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieutenant William Selden, and Captain Coles. Captain Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during thLieutenant Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valour never surpassed. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest so unequal! But who has fallen more honourably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. LasSelden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, General Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, I learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the full moon threw its light, kissed the cold
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
assistant marshals wore blue scarfs and white rosettes. Their saddle-cloths were white, trimmed with blue. Each carried a baton two feet in length, of blue color, with ends gilt two inches deep. The procession was composed as follows:-- Aids. Marshal-in-Chief Aids. A National Flag, with appropriate emblems. The President of the United States, with the President Elect and Suite, with Marshals on their left, and the Marshal of the United States for the District of Columbia (Colonel William Selden) and his Deputies on their right. The Committee of Arrangements of the Senate. Ex-Presidents of the United States. The Republican Association. The Judiciary. The Clergy. Foreign Ministers. The Corps Diplomatique. Members elect, Members, and ex-Members of Congress, and ex-Members of the Cabinet. The Peace Congress. Heads of Bureaus. Goernors and ex-Governors of States and Territories, and Members of the Legislatures of the same. Officers
Mayor's Court. --On Saturday last, Norman, slave of Wm. Greaner, and George, slave of J. H. Grant, were ordered a tickling for altering their passes from twelve to one o'clock. Daniel Scroggins, who indulged in a bender in the First Market Saturday morning, was locked up. He was afterwards ordered to the Chain-Gang for want of security, Wm. Selden was acquitted of stealing two rugs and a box valued at $6 from George T. Paton. Lawrence Spain was committed in default of $100 security for beating the wife of John S. Turpin.
Selden, Withers & Co --This firm has turned up again, in a case before the Court of Appeals, wherein John Withers petitions from a decree pronounced by the Circuit Court of Alexandria county on the 1st of June, 1861, in a suit in which the Board of Public Works was plaintiff and Wm. Selden, with the petitioner and others were defendants. The Court being of opinion that the decree is interlocutory, no execution can issue without the order of the Court; and deeming it most proper that the cfrom a decree pronounced by the Circuit Court of Alexandria county on the 1st of June, 1861, in a suit in which the Board of Public Works was plaintiff and Wm. Selden, with the petitioner and others were defendants. The Court being of opinion that the decree is interlocutory, no execution can issue without the order of the Court; and deeming it most proper that the case should be proceeded in further in the Court below, before an appeal is allowed therein, declined the appeal for that reason.
erence of opinion between the Mayor and Mr. Johnson touching the rules and regulations of gambling houses; and the developments in regard to the unceremonious scampering of amateur sportsmen when the Philistines suddenly appeared in their midst — A good many new packs of "Sam Hart's squared linen playing cards," some sweat cloths, and other playthings were exhibited in Court as the plunder of the expedition. The Mayor, after hearing the testimony, remanded Copeland to be indicted under the gaming law, and admitted him to bail in the sum of $1,000 for his appearance on the 2d Monday in February. The summary sentence of burning was passed upon the gaming tools seized by the officers. Wm. Selden, free negro, was arraigned to answer the charge of keeping the door of a faro-bank establishment; and it appearing by competent testimony that he opened the door to let two gentlemen out about the time the officers went in, on the night of Friday last, he was also remanded for indictment.
s arrived at South Mills, near the Virginia line, and is slowly progressing towards this city. It is asserted that Capt. O. J. Wise is certainly among the killed, and also that he was dangerously wounded, but was not killed. It is stated that Wm. Selden, a son of Dr. Wm. Selden, of this city, was killed at one of the guns. He was a very competent engineer, and held in high estimation for his gentlemanly character, courage; and intelligence. I learn that Capt. John S. Taylor, of this city, whDr. Wm. Selden, of this city, was killed at one of the guns. He was a very competent engineer, and held in high estimation for his gentlemanly character, courage; and intelligence. I learn that Capt. John S. Taylor, of this city, who fought at our field pieces, distinguished himself by his coolness, bravery, the precision, and the death-dealing effect with which his guns were served, sweeping down the swarming ranks of the enemy at every fire. Capt. O. J. Wise's company fought with cigar-like ferocity, and a desperation conquerable only by death. This gallant company suffered severely, but, I hope, not to the extent reported. That all excepting seven of those gallant and brave-hearted Virginians should have been pla
s supposed to be captured. About sixty escaped of our men, the rest were either taken prisoners or killed. Five of the Rangers escaped, four are with Gen. Wise--two sergeants, one corporal, and two privates; the two privates are in the city. Wm. Selden, son of Dr. Selden, of our city, was killed while bravely defending the battery. Thus we close the scene of this fearful contest. The number killed and wounded on our side we cannot say; that of the enemy, by thier own confession, is about onDr. Selden, of our city, was killed while bravely defending the battery. Thus we close the scene of this fearful contest. The number killed and wounded on our side we cannot say; that of the enemy, by thier own confession, is about one thousand. Think of our little Spartan band opposing overwhelming odds; think of the tenacity with which they stood to their battery, never leaving it until the overwhelming force of the enemy, compelled them to retreat; witness the courage and intrepid bravery with which they encountered the foe while on the field. Had we been reinforced by three regiments the enemy must have been whipped. Three times were the New York Zouaves repulsed, driven in the water, and nearly drowned. Lieut. B
at the enemy. Major Hugh W. Fry. with his battalion, arrived upon the ground too late to participate in the action, and was ordered to surrender with the others. Col. Green's regiment arrived in time to fire one volley before surrendering. Captain Coles, of Charlottesville with his company, was in the hottest of the fight. As one of his men fell, he took his musket and fired fourteen rounds, exhibiting the most determined bravery, when he was shot through the body and killed. Major Selden, of Norfolk, fought with great heroism at one of the guns. He was in the act of preparing his gun for the only remaining charge of ammunition, when the top of his head was blown off by a shot from the enemy, and he fell dead. It is gratifying to hear that our loss in killed is by no means so great as at first reported. It is believed that it does not exceed forty. The enemy must have suffered very heavily. Indeed, we hear that the flag-of-truce boat, at Norfolk, brought a report
rning from Currutuck, having communicated with a steamer sent down to Roanoke Island under a flag of truce. She brought up the bodies of Captain O. J. Wise, Lieut. Wm. Selden and Capt. Coles. Capt. Wise was pierced by three balls, and Lieut. Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and Lieut. Selden was shot through the head. The Yankees who saw Captain Wise during the fierce and unequal contest, declare that he displayed a gallantry and valor, never surprised. Alas, that he has fallen in a contest not unequal. But, who has fallen more honorably, more nobly? Young Selden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, whSelden, too, died at his gun, while gallantly fighting the enemy that had gathered in so superior numbers upon our shores. Last night, when the steamer arrived at Currituck, Gen. Wise directed that the coffin containing the remains of his son be opened. Then, I learn from those who were present, a scene transpired that words cannot describe. The old hero bent over the body of his son, on whose pale face the full moon threw its light, kissed the cold brow many tim
roceeding.--Henry Temple, a free man of color, of decent appearance, was arraigned for forcibly entering a room in the house of a free negress named Willie Ann Smith, and tearing and cutting up a lot of wearing apparel found there, belonging to Wm. Selden, likewise of the colored fraternity. This was a case with which the green-eyed monster had clearly something to do. Temple had been for a long time enjoying intimate relations with Smith, and repairing to the house and finding Selden installedSelden installed in her affections he proceeded first to whack that colored person over the head with a chair, and when he had retired under the pressure of adverse circumstances, he cut and tore up his remaining garments in blind fury. The Recorder thought such conduct was not allowable in a well regulated community, and in order to impress a perfect understanding of the matter on Temple, directed that he should receive 39 lashes. An appeal was taken, ball given, and the case sent before the Hustings Court n
1 2