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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
xt day, as the river was rising, the light-draughts went in again, supported by two iron-clads, the Cairo, Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge, and the Pittsburgh, Lieutenant Hoel. The Queen of the West also went in. About a dozen miles up, the Caiced in position in the rear of Vicksburg, where they were constantly and efficiently worked by naval crews, first under Selfridge, and later under Walker. At the same time the squadron was engaged in the duty of patrolling the rivers, keeping open ied from time to time in detached bodies at other points. A cut-off, at the mouth of the Arkansas, ingeniously made by Selfridge in April, had contributed materially to the facility of operations at that place. In May Lieutenant-Commander Wilson i caused an unusually severe loss. The fall of Vicksburg was followed by successful gun-boat raids, one in July under Selfridge in the Red, Black, and Tensas rivers, the other in August under Bache in White River. General Herron and Lieutenant-Com
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
, 4 howitzers. Eads iron-Clads.--St. Louis (Baron De Kalb), Lieut. W. McGunnegle (St. Charles), Lieut.-Com. J. G. Walker (Yazoo River, Arkansas Post, Yazoo Pass, Haynes's Bluff, Yazoo City), 13 guns (reduced to 7, May, 1863); Cairo, Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge, 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Carondelet, Com. Henry Walke (action with Arkansas, July 15th, 1862), Lieut. J. M. Murphy (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 15th, 1863, 11 guns; Cincinnati, Lieut.-Com. B. Wilso, Lieut.-Com. J. P. Foster (Yazoo Pass), 2 guns; Indianola, Lieut.-Com. George Brown, 4 guns; Tuscumbia, Lieut.-Com. J. W. Shirk (Vicksburg and Grand Gulf), 5 guns. Rodgers gun-boats.--Conestoga, Lieut. G. W. Blodgett (St. Charles), Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge, 4 guns, 1 howitzer; Lexington, Lieut. James W. Shirk (St. Charles, Yazoo River, Dec., ‘62, Arkansas Post); Lieut.-Com. S. L. Phelps (Cumberland River, Jan.,‘63); Lieut.-Com. Le Roy Fitch (Tennessee and Cumberland rivers); Lieut. G. M.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
the marks of sixty bullets, a proof The fight at Blair's plantation. From a War-time sketch. of the hotness of the fire. This unequal contest could not continue long, and after an hour and a half the enemy retreated with a loss of over four hundred killed and wounded, as afterward ascertained. Among the former was General Thomas Green, their foremost partisan fighter west of the Mississippi. Of this action Admiral Porter, in his Naval history of the civil War, writes as follows: Selfridge conducted this affair in the handsomest manner, inflicting such a punishment on the enemy that their infantry gave no more trouble, having come to the conclusion that fighting with muskets against iron-clads did not pay. To say nothing of the loss in men inflicted upon the enemy, the Osage had killed the best officer the Confederates had in this quarter, who, judging from his energy on this occasion, would have given no end of trouble had he lived. Lieutenant [George M.] Bache managed the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
of torpedoes, but not otherwise, as there were rifle-pits all along the left bank of the Yazoo, and the enemy were supplied with light artillery. At Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's request he was sent on this duty in the Cairo, with the Pittsburg, Lieut.-Commanding Hoel, and the ram Queen of the West, Colonel Charles Ellet, Jr.hines and haul them to the shore. where they were destroyed by firing volleys of musketry into them. After this work had been prosecuted for some time Lieut.-Comr. Selfridge proceeded ahead in the Cairo to cover the Marmora, which was thought to be sorely beset by the enemy's sharpshooters. The Cairo encountered a floating to torpedo. (from a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke.) This was a bad day's work for a beginning, but the admiral looked upon it simply as an accident of war, and Selfridge was immediately given command of the Conestoga. The loss of the Cairo was the more regretted as she had lately been made shot proof, by covering her weakest poi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
been left without provisions. To Captain Walke, Commander Woodworth, Lieutenant-Commanders Breese, Foster, Greer, Shirk, Owen, Wilson, Walker, Bache, Murphy, Selfridge, Prichett, Ramsay and Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Hoel, I feel much indebted for their active and energetic attention to all my orders, and their ready co-operat for any service. When the Army called on the Navy for siege guns, I detailed what officers and men I could spare to man and work the batteries. Lieutenant Commander Selfridge had command of the naval battery on the right wing in General Sherman's corps. This battery was worked with marked ability, and elicited the warmest praises from the commanding general. One thousand shells were fired into the enemy's works from Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's guns. His services being required up the river, I relieved him a few days before the surrender, and Lieutenant-Commander Walker supplied his place and conducted the firing with the same ability. Acti
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
ion up the Red, Black and Tensas Rivers, under Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge. destruction of enemy's vessels and stores. River, ascending the Black and Tensas Rivers. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge penetrated to the head of navigation on the lad they could carry on their raids with impunity. So when Selfridge appeared with his little flotilla on the 12th of July, thwant of pilots they could not be immediately followed. Selfridge now divided his forces, sending the Manitou and Rattler uwards converted into a war-vessel carrying fifty guns. Selfridge's other two vessels about the same time captured the stead up some of the tortuous channels known only to pilots. Selfridge started in pursuit and soon overtook two of the transportcould proceed no further in this direction. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge fortunately learned of a large amount of ammunyond making money by supplying the Confederate armies. Selfridge captured at one place fifteen thousand rounds of smooth-b
sels pushed on ahead, and which had arrived one half hour too late to capture six steamers which had succeeded in getting over the falls, and escaping with one exception, the steamer Countess, burned by the enemy after grounding on the falls. Had your order duly reached me, we no doubt would have captured the steamers. By morning, nine gunboats had arrived, and I landed a force of one hundred and eighty men to occupy the town, and to seize the rebel property. This force, under Lieutenant Commander Selfridge, was in occupation of the place when you arrived. Seven prisoners of war were captured by the pickets. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. L. Phelps, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, U. S. N., Commanding Mississippi Squadron. flag-ship Black Hawk, Mississippi Squadron, Alexandria, Louisiana, March 29, 1864. sir: Being about to leave for Shreveport, or as high up the river as I can get, I have the honor to report progress. After a grea
gunboat of fighting fame, the Cairo The first engagement of the Cairo, a third-rate ironclad of 512 tons, mounting six 42-pounders, six 32-pounders, three 8-inch guns and one 12-lb. howitzer, was under the command of Lieutenant N. C. Bryant on February 19th, in the Cumberland River in Tennessee. At Clarksville with the gunboat Conestoga the Cairo engaged three forts, capturing the town. On May 10th the Cairo, still commanded by Lieutenant Bryant, participated in the action at Fort Pillow and the river combat with the Confederate River defense fleet. While being rammed the Cincinnati was so injured that she sank. The Mound City also was injured and three of the Confederate vessels were disabled. Once more the Cairo, on June 6th, with four other ironclad gunboats and two of the Ellet rams, engaged the Confederate flotilla off the city of Memphis. On December 12, 1862, the Cairo, then under the command of Lieutenant T. O. Selfridge, was destroyed by a torpedo in the Yazoo River.
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
ul on the rivers. Porter took both with him up the Red River. On the return the Osage was making the descent with great difficulty, in tow of the Black Hawk, when on April 12th she ran aground opposite Blair's plantation. A Confederate force twelve hundred strong, under General Thomas Green, soon appeared on the west bank and, planting four field-pieces, advanced to attack the stranded ironclad. The brisk enfilading fire of the Lexington and the Neosho did not deter them. Lieutenant-Commander T. O. Selfridge waited till the heads of the Confederates appeared above the river bank. Then he let drive at them with his two big guns, pouring upon them a rain of grape, canister, and shrapnel. General Green, who behaved with the greatest gallantry, had his head blown off. After an hour and a half the Confederates withdrew from the unequal contest, with a loss of over four hundred dead and wounded. The Osage was sent to Mobile Bay in the spring of 1865 and was there sunk by a submarine
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Darien ship Canal, (search)
under Commander T. O. Selfridge, of the United States navy, to Isthmus of Darien; and the other, under Captain Shufeldt, of the navy, to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Three routes were surveyed across the narrow part of the Isthmus of Darien by Selfridge, and he reported all three as having obstacles that made the construction of a canal impracticable. He reported a route by the Atrato and Napipi rivers as perfectly feasible. It would include 150 miles of river navigation and a canal less than 40 miles in extent. It would call for 3 miles of rock cutting 125 feet deep, and a tunnel of 5 miles, with a roof sufficiently high to admit the tallestmasted ships. Selfridge estimated the entire cost at $124,000,000. The whole matter was referred in 1872 to a commission to continue investigations. A French company undertook the construction of a canal between Aspinwall and Panama in 1881, under the direction of Ferdinand De Lesseps (q. v.). After expending many millions of dollars, the p
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