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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
a gun-boat and its armament sent in quest of him. We have taken Springfield, Missouri. Rosecrans sends our officers, taken at Murfreesborough, to Alton, Ill., to retaliate on us for the doom pronounced in our President's proclamation, and one of his generals has given notice that if we burn a railroad bridge (in our own country) all private property within a mile of it shall be destroyed. The black flag next. We have no news from North Carolina. Mr. Caperton was elected C. S. Senator by the Virginia Legisture on Saturday, in place of Mr. Preston, deceased. An intercepted letter from a Mr. Sloane, Charlotte, N. C., to A. T. Stewart & Co., New York, was laid before the Secretary of War yesterday. He urged the New York merchant, who has contributed funds for our subjugation, to send merchandise to the South, now destitute, and he would act a°s salesman. The Secretary indorsed conscript him, and yet the Assistant Secretary has given instructions to Col. Godwin, in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
ie and Bilbro, and Lieutenants Larry, Dunlop and Wimberly, and the meeting adjourned to meet Monday at 3 o'clock. Jan. 31. Sunday. I am officer of the guard. One of the 26th Ala. is officer of the day, and is exceedingly verdant. Col. S. B. Pickens came in at night from furlough. Feb. 1. (Part here torn off.) The meeting was held pursuant to adjournment, the memorial adopted, and a committee appointed to get signatures to the petition and forward it to Hon. Robert Jemison, Jr., C. S. Senator, and Hon. W. P. Chilton, Representative from Ala., for presentation to the Confederate Congress. Feb. 2. Called at Dr. Terrell's, near Orange Court House, and met his pretty daughter, Mrs. Goodwin. At night received five letters and several Georgia and South Carolina papers. Feb. 3. Gus. Reid returned from absence at Lynchburg. Orders came at night to be ready to move to Hanover Junction at 6 o'clock. Battle's Ala. brigade left winter quarters at 6 1/2 o'clock for Gordonsville,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
our proceedings. At six o'clock the meeting was called to order, Capt. Bowie being chairman and Lieutenant Dunlap, of the 3rd Alabama, acting as secretary. The memorial drafted was read and discussed, pro and con, by Captains Bowie and Bilbro and Lieutenants Larey, Dunlap and Wimberly, and the meeting adjourned to meet Monday at 3 o'clock. The meeting was held, a memorial adopted and a committee appointed to get signatures to the petition and forward it to Hon. Robert Jemison, Jr., C. S. Senator, and Hon. W. P. Chilton, representative from Alabama, for presentation to the Confederate Congress. February 3.—Orders came at night to be ready to move to Hanover Junction at 6 o'clock. Battle's Alabama brigade left winter quarters at 6 and a half o'clock for Gordonsville and arrived there at 2 P. M. We took the cars at midnight for Hanover Junction. General R. D. Johnston's North Carolina brigade preceded ours. February 7.—Our brigade took the train for Richmond early in the morn
Election of a C. S. Senator. Milledgeville, Ga. Nov. 18. --Herschel V. Johnson was elected Confederate Senator to day.
Election of C. S. Senator. The Legislature on Saturday, after five days ineffectual balloting, succeeded, on the twentieth ballot, in electing Hon. Allen T. Caperton, of the county of Monroe, Confederate States Senator for the unexpired term of the late Hon. Wm. Ballard Preston.
The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1863., [Electronic resource], The great Yankee railroad raid in Mississippi--how it was executed. (search)
The New Alabama Senator. --The Montgomery Advertiser, which appears to speak by the card, says of Hon. Robert Jemison, the newly-elected C. S. Senator from Alabama: In the party nomenclature of the post Mr. Jemison was a Whig and American, and those who know his sentiments best from long, intimate association say that he always adhered to his early faith as a State rights man. He had, however, become identified with those who did not think the time had come for a united movement of the Southern States for ssion, and hence we find him in the Convention which voted Alabama out of the Union a co-operationist; but he signed the ordinance of secession and gave in his adhesion to the action of the Convention when taken as irrevocable and binding on every loyal citizen. From that day to this. Mr. Jemison has been firm and unfaltering in support of the war, and has rendered efficient assistance to the Governor, whose aid, he has been, raising troops for the State and Confederate
C. S. Senator appointed. --Gov. Vance has appointed the Hon. Edwin G. Reade to the Confederate Senate, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Davis. Mr. Reade will hold the position until the 18th February, when Gov. Graham will succeed him.