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Whi-Minister Jonas was arrested --Our readers have already been apprised of the fact that ex-Minister Jones, of Iowa recently returned from Bogota, was arrested several days since, in New York, by order of Mr. Seward, but upon what particular charge was not stated. We since learn, however, from the Washington correspondent of the New York Times, that the charge upon which Mr. Jones was arrested, "was that of writing letters from Bogota to Jeff. Davis, proffering the utmost anxiety for the success of the disunion movement, and promising to join him on his return from New Grenada."
The prospect now, --We had not until now thoughts Southern man susceptible of sympathy for a people whom we so abhor as those of the North; but we do confess to a sense of borrow for the Northern public under the humiliation which Seward has brought upon them. The only circumstance which tends to mitigate this emotion is the doubt whether that people really feel their disgrace at all. Passionately devoted to interest, and oblivious to every emotion of honor, pride, or shame, in conflict wiled upon them. One of the most interesting studies of modern times will be to witness the effect of Sew- cowardice upon the Northern public. There were several most significant speeches pronounced in Congress before the denouement of this Seward-Russell correspondence. The extreme wing of abolitionists, what in Paris would be called the "Mountain," were unequivocal in their utterances in favor of refusing and resenting the expected demand of Great Britain. The speech of Hale in the ben
d in numbers, in elegance of equipage and official costume, as well as in the large number of personages conspicuous in every walk of professional life. Secretary Seward.--The accustomed hour of twelve o'clock which custom designates for opening welcome doors on such festal occasions. had hardly, arrived are the tide was setrdial greetings well calculated to disperse for an hour the grave and solemn cares which such stormy times as these weigh upon a great public man. His daughter, Miss Seward, and his daughter in-law, Mrs Frederick Seward, the lady of the Assistant Secretary of State, were present to contribute their full share in the graceful and plMrs Frederick Seward, the lady of the Assistant Secretary of State, were present to contribute their full share in the graceful and pleasant honors of the holiday entertainment. The distinguished Secretary was in fine spirits, and the dignified simplicity of his manners, combined with his happy mood, could not have failed to inspire in his numerous guests the most pleasurable recollections of their visit. Secretary Chase.--The throng which pressed their wa
k. A telegram from Washington, dated the 4th, gives the following about election matters there: "Governor Dennison, Postmaster-General, has gone to Ohio to vote; Secretary Welles and Chief Clerk Faxon left to-night for Connecticut, and Secretary Seward and Assistant Secretary Frederick Seward left for New York. Not less than thirty thousand soldiers, clerks and employees of different kinds, have gone home to vote, and there is not left enough clerical force to run any bureau or departmentAssistant Secretary Frederick Seward left for New York. Not less than thirty thousand soldiers, clerks and employees of different kinds, have gone home to vote, and there is not left enough clerical force to run any bureau or department here. Colonel Thomas R. Scott, of the Pennsylvania railroad, led of in arrangements to carry home voters at a quarter of a cent per mile, gaining Mr. Lincoln twenty thousand votes, thus enabling every one to go any distance at nearly a nominal cost. Two extra trains left here to-day with votes, and last night nearly fifteen hundred were left for want of cars. "Captain Camp, assistant quartermaster here, who has had charges of renting buildings for Government use since the war broke out,
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