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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 14, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Wm H. Seward or search for Wm H. Seward in all documents.

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h a solution as this is worthy the profound philosopher from whom it emanates — That ladies have an irreconcilable antipathy to that which is low and coarse, is true enough, and that in this may be found one reason for their ayersion to Lincolndom is undeniable.--Nothing could well be more intensely vulgar than the man whom the people of the North have deliberately chosen as their representative and ruler, though he is less nanseating in his undisguised blackgardisms than his prime minister, Seward: a creature even more depraved in his morals, whose elaborate imitation of the habits and manners of good society cannot conceal from the world that he is in no respect a well-bred man; and, what is far worse, has none of the instincts of a gentleman. Like the master is his following, and never, we suppose, since the world begun, were as many blackguards collected together under the banners of civilzation as the scrapings of all Christendom, the multitudinous "lewd fellows of the baser sort
e carrying it with a high hand at New Orleans. Such is to be our portion, no doubt, if we tamely give up this city to the enemy. We should hope the treatment of the French Consul would rouse the resentment of the Emperor. But if it should, Seward would only spologize like the cringing dog he is, and all would be soon right again. No doubt the treatment of the Belgian Consul will call forth a storm of words in the British Parliament. But it will all end in a firmer alliance between Sewarno doubt, if we tamely give up this city to the enemy. We should hope the treatment of the French Consul would rouse the resentment of the Emperor. But if it should, Seward would only spologize like the cringing dog he is, and all would be soon right again. No doubt the treatment of the Belgian Consul will call forth a storm of words in the British Parliament. But it will all end in a firmer alliance between Seward and Russell. There is no hope of succor from either of these quarters.
ring in a matter the act of emancipation unconstitutional. Touching the real feeling in the State, an is related of Major-General Dix, department includes the city of Baltimore, which, apart from its literal truth, how much confidence is reposed by the -ing authorities upon the "Union sentiment" which is claimed to have an existence that city. When Gen. Dix was first thrust the city of Baltimore, and the people of Maryland, as their dictator, and the tool of Lincoln dynasty, Secretary Seward in his -uctions to him particularly enjoined up- him the importance of fostering the "pa- Union sentiment of the people."-- Gen. Dix in his reply. "First send me line telescope to discover it. There are the hundred professed. Union residents of the city. I would trust in an emergency." was right for once, and he had sense to express his convictions to his Another significant fact is the great preference of wealth, social standing and -tability in favor of the Southern cause
The Mexican question. Important Statement of the Views of the Lincoln Government. The following circular letter has been addressed by the abolition Secretary Seward to the several American legations abroad. It is a translation from a French version, which appears in the Archives Diplomatiques: Washington, Monday, March 3, 1862, Sir: We observe indications of a growing impression in Europe that the demonstration made by the Spanish, French and British forces against Mexico is likely Mexican Government, in order that the latter might, with the approbation of the Allies, extricate itself from its present embarrassments. But this is strictly a question of internal administration. There could be no greater error than to see in this disagreement a divergence of opinion in our Government, or in the American people, in regard to their cordial wishes for the safety, weifare, and stability of the Republican Government in that country. I am your obed't serv't, Wm H. Seward.