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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
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ive cannon, one thousand stand of arms, and seven hundred and fifteen prisoners, amongst whom are Capt. Samuel Barron, Lieut. Sharp, and Dr. Wyatt M. Brown, all late of the United States Navy, and Major Andrews and other officers late of the United Simes; No. eight, a gun mounted on naval carriage, was commanded by Lieutenant Murdaugh, of the C. S. N, assisted by Lieutenant Sharp and Midshipman Stafford. Capt. Thomas H. Sharp had command of No. one, but, owing to the wrenches not fitting thCapt. Thomas H. Sharp had command of No. one, but, owing to the wrenches not fitting the eccentric axles, was unable to bring it into action. He stayed by his gun during most of the engagement, but could not fire. Thus we had but three guns we could bring to bear, (if the enemy took up his position of the previous day,) viz., Nos. st of the officers and men at the naval gun, who fired frequently to try the range. Lieut. Murdaugh was badly wounded; Lieut. Sharp was knocked down by a shell, which passed through the parapet near his head, and brought the blood from his right ear
, assisted by Lieutenants Johnston and Grimes; No. eight, a gun mounted on naval carriage, was commanded by Lieutenant Murdaugh, of the C. S. N, assisted by Lieutenant Sharp and Midshipman Stafford. Capt. Thomas H. Sharp had command of No. one, but, owing to the wrenches not fitting the eccentric axles, was unable to bring itCapt. Thomas H. Sharp had command of No. one, but, owing to the wrenches not fitting the eccentric axles, was unable to bring it into action. He stayed by his gun during most of the engagement, but could not fire. Thus we had but three guns we could bring to bear, (if the enemy took up his position of the previous day,) viz., Nos. six, seven, and eight. At forty minutes past seven A. M., of the 29th; the enemy opened fire on us from the steam frigate M desire especially to speak of the conduct of the officers and men at the naval gun, who fired frequently to try the range. Lieut. Murdaugh was badly wounded; Lieut. Sharp was knocked down by a shell, which passed through the parapet near his head, and brought the blood from his right ear and cheek in considerable quantity, killi
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
iformed; scarcely two had guns alike — no two exhibited the same trappings. Here went one fellow in a shirt of brilliant green, on his side an immense cavalry sabre, in his belt two navy revolvers and a bowie knife, and slung from his shoulder a Sharp's rifle. Right by his side was another, upon whose hip dangled a light medical sword, in his hand a double-barrelled shot-gun, in his boot an immense scythe, on his heel the inevitable spur — his whole appearance, from tattered boot, through whiazed audaciously his toes, indicating that the plunderings of many a different locality made up his whole. Generally the soldiers were armed with shot-guns or squirrel rifles; some had the old flint-lock muskets, a few had Minie guns, and others Sharp's or Maynard rifles, while all, to the poorest, had horses. The very elite of the Confederate forces were there--Generals Price, Rains, Slack, Parsons, Harris, Green, Hardee, were all there--Colonels Saunders, Payn, Beal, Turner, Craven, Clay,
ndria, Va., Nov. 17, 1862. Capt. E. Sparrow Purdy, A. A. G., Alexandria Division: sir: A reconnoitring party of a squadron of cavalry, consisting of my company and Captain Bennett's, was ordered out this day, under my command. The command proceeded along the Little River turnpike to within a short distance of Annandale, where we passed the last of our pickets. Here we halted, and ordered the arms to be loaded, and sent forward an advance guard, consisting of a dozen good men, armed with Sharp's rifled carbines, under command of Lieutenant Stevenson, of my company. I also detached a rear guard and flank patrols, under the direction of Lieutenants Woodruff and Thomas, Captain Bennett and myself remaining with the main body. In this order we proceeded to within one mile and a quarter of Fairfax Court House, where we learned that about a dozen of the enemy's cavalry had been for corn early in the morning. Hence we marched to within about a thousand yards of the Court House, when o
detachment of fifteen had been stationed at the bridge to guard it, of whom two were absent at the time of the attack. The Federals, fifty or sixty in number, under command of a Dutch Jew peddler named Netter, and among whom were several who had been raised in the neighborhood, made their appearance about daybreak Thursday morning. Four of the guard, who were on duty, and who were standing by a plank cabin, fired upon them, whereupon they received a volley of over one hundred rounds from Sharp's revolving rifles, killing two instantly and wounding another. Most of the shots were fired into the cabin, on the supposition that the rest of the guard were asleep in it, but fortunately they were in a cabin a little distance off. They were aroused by the firing, but by the time they were up, the Federals were at the cabin, and they had to surrender. They put the prisoners under guard, tore down the cabins, put the planks on the bridge, which they sprinkled with turpentine, and then fir
w just beyond, in a lane, the advance guard of the enemy, about one hundred strong, who were disposed to dispute our further advance. Lieut. Yates, of Company B, who led our advance guard, dismounted his men, and gave the rebels a taste of his Sharp's rifles. He had not opened fire but a few moments, when Captain Bradway was ordered to charge on the enemy with his company. This he did, and the rebels, who before this had broken, fled in all directions. Colonel Glover, who, with two compan, where the enemy was hidden from view, came a perfect hailstorm of bullets. From Mount Zion, where the main body of the enemy was posted, came a continuous roar of fire-arms. From the lane, the open field, and the cornfield, the sharp crack of Sharp's rifles blended with the louder report of the Enfield and Dimmick. Our men fought like heroes, and never a man of them flinched. There was not a moment, from the beginning of the battle to the end, when the fate of the day was undecided. Af