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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 21 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The draft riots in New York. (search)
empting to clear the streets, and almost while they were still in sight the rioters had recommenced their occupation of plunder and murder. Late in the day, a fight took place in First avenue, between Eighteenth and Nineteenth streets, between a desperate mob and a force of militia and enrolled citizens. Colonel Jardine, of the Ninth New York Volunteers, was shot, and crippled for life, and the troops were repulsed until Captain Putnam, with his company, and the Permanent guard, under Captain Shelley, acting aide-de-camp, were sent by General Brown to the rescue. Thursday, July 16.-At an early hour in the morning the Seventh Regiment New York Militia, which had been summoned home by telegraph, arrived, and the other militia regiments followed during the day. By this time the riot was regarded as practically over. Mayor Opdyke had the day previous issued a proclamation, calling on the citizens to resume their avocations. It was also announced from Washington that the draft had
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
wonderful aptitude for fighting, formed in this respect no exception to the experience of centuries. If that stern clash of antagonistic prejudices and contending interests produced, on either side, a genius family comparable to that of Frederick or of Marlborough, there was but one--and he fell before either friend, or foe, or fate, had found the limit of his power. What he did will survive as rivaling the best exploits of the most renowned in arms, and Jackson stands among captains as Shelley among poets-enlarged by death into the perfection of promise. But he stands alone, so far as this country is concerned. Nor would any judicious admirer of General Hill (and this paper is written from a standpoint of affectionate appreciation) institute any comparison between his qualities of leadership and those of General Lee. Their respective positions well suited and well describes their distinctive capacities. The one possessed all the characteristics of great military talent, an
ent in at double-quick. Colonel Lane's next, and then Field's, were in like manner, and with equal spirit, thrown forward on the enemy, killing many and driving the rest down the precipitous banks into the river. The advance of my command was made under the heaviest artillery fire I have ever witnessed. Too much praise cannot be awarded to officers and men for their conduct. The little corps, in this, as in all the battles, has displayed as much valor as any troops in the field. Lieutenant Shelley, commanding that corps, displayed his usual gallantry, remaining under fire in the discharge of his duty, after a severe wound, until ordered off the field. Captain Archer and Lieutenants Thomas and Lemmon, of my staff, rendered valuable and efficient assistance. We held our position until dark, when we returned to camp, and took up our line of march the same night toward Martinsburg. The regiments were commanded as follows: First Tennessee, Colonel Turney; Fourteenth Tennesse
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.6 (search)
r me. She was the undisputed mistress of her household, and those who were of it could only remain with her by uncomplaining submissiveness. This feeling of dependence on other people's favour, and the sense that my condition was never to be other than the singer of their virtues, greatly troubled me at times. There are some, by nature proud, who patient in all else, demand but this: To love and be beloved, with gentleness; and being scorned, What wonder if they die, some living death!--Shelley. To her own children, Aunt Mary was the best of mothers. Had I received but a tithe of her affection, I fear that, like an ass partial to his crib, I should have become too home-loving ever to leave. As Jacob served Laban, I would have served aunt for years, for a mere smile, but she had not interest enough in me to study my disposition, or to suspect that the silent boy with a somewhat dogged look could be so touched by emotion. What I might have become with gracious treatment her y
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Brigadier-General Wilcox of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
creditable. After the wounding of four regimental commanders, the other officers who succeeded to command acted with great gallantry and energy. Among these I may mention Lieutenant-Colonel Tayloe, of the Eleventh Alabama regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Shelley, of the Tenth Alabama, and Lieutenant-Colonel Broome, Fourteenth Alabama. With reference to the action of the 3d instant, I beg to report that early in the morning, before sunrise, the brigade was ordered out to support artillery undir infantry. This day my men acted with their usual gallantry, though they accomplished but little. The regimental commanders were active and zealous in commanding and directing their men. Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert, of the Eighth; Lieutenant-Colonel Shelley, of the Tenth; Lieutenant-Colonel Tayloe, of the Eleventh, and Captain King, are all deserving of especial praise — the latter had lost a finger the day before. Captain May, Ninth Alabama, had also been wounded on the 2d, but remained
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Lowell (search)
rst-rate literary magazine, proved a failure; and it is to be feared that he lost money by it. See Scudder's Life of Lowell, III.109. However the world might use him he was sure of comfort and happiness at his own fireside, where he read Shelley, and Keats, and Lessing, while Mrs. Lowell studied upon her German translations. The sympathy of a truehearted woman is always valuable, even when she does not quite understand the grievance in question, but the sympathy that Maria Lowell couldutaries as Virgil, Moliere, Chaucer, Keats, and Lessing. It may have been better for him that he began in this manner; but a remark that Scudder attributes to him in regard to Lessing gives us an insight into the deeper mechanism of his mind. Shelley's poetry, he said, was like the transient radiance of St. Elmo's fire, but Lessing was wholly a poet. This is exactly the opposite of the view he held during his college life, for Lessing worked in a methodical and painstaking manner and finish
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ut persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a moment, and enumerate the members of the family. John Brown was born in 1800, and his wife in 1816, though both might have been supposed older than the ages thus indicated. He has had in all t
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
ut persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a moment, and enumerate the members of the family. John Brown was born in 1800, and his wife in 1816, though both might have been supposed older than the ages thus indicated. He has had in all t
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
an a good chaplain, and no part of their daily duties of so much importance as that of religious services. The men who commanded the regiment for the most part of the time that I was with them, were: Colonel W. H. Forney, Episcopalian; Lieutenant-Colonel Shelley, Methodist inclined; Major Joseph Truss, Baptist; Captain Brewster, of seemingly no fixed denominational preference. There never was a time that any one of these noble spirits would not do any and every thing that I desired to further the interests of public worship, preaching, prayer-meetings, etc. They did not allow anything that they could control to interfere with our hours of worship. And Colonel Shelley, who commanded most of the time (Colonel Forney being a prisoner), often said that the work of the chaplain was essential to the welfare of the regiment, essential to its efficiency, etc. The officers of the brigade, nearly all of them, were similar in conduct and disposition to those of my own regiment. And so I foun
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
ny of all literary manuscripts, this characteristic document should have been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest prayer, next to that for the health of his brother Tom, would be that some child of his brother George should be the first American poet. This letter, printed by Milnes, was written Oct. 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isabel, who was thought greatly to resemble her uncle John, both in looks and genius, died sadly at the age of seventeen. It is pleasant to think that we have, through the care exercised by this Americanized brother, an opportunity of coming into close touch with the mental processes of that rare genius which first imparted something like actual color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he compares a moment's interview with one who had seen Shelley to picking up an eagle's feather on a lonely heath. 1896
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