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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 22 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 21 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises. You can also browse the collection for Shelley or search for Shelley in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 3 (search)
hat unique, battered, dingy little quarto volume of Shelley's manuscript poems, in his own handwriting and that of his wife, first given by Miss Jane Clairmont (Shelley's Constantia ) to Mr. Edward A. Silsbee, and then preited many of its various readings in his edition of Shelley's poems. But he has passed by a good many others; hese need, I think, for the sake of all students of Shelley, to be put in print, so that in case of the loss orotes or supplemental notes, and yet not canceled by Shelley:-- Three days the flowers of the garden fair Likthere are many cases where the manuscript shows, in Shelley's own handwriting, variations subsequently canceledhen the original form of language, as it appears in Shelley's handwriting, italicizing the words which vary, ane that, in a few cases, it may have been made by Mrs. Shelley. Gazed through clear dew on the tender sky. ve plant, except that there is a canceled verse of Shelley's Curse against Lord Eldon for depriving him of his
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 4 (search)
erary manuscripts, this characteristic document should have been preserved for us. It will be remembered that Keats himself once wrote in a letter that his fondest prayer, next to that for the health of his brother Tom, would be that some child of his brother George should be the first American poet. This letter, printed by Milnes, was written October 29, 1818. George Keats died about 1851, and his youngest daughter, Isabel, who was thought greatly to resemble her uncle John, both in looks and genius, died sadly at the age of seventeen. It is pleasant to think that we have, through the care exercised by this American brother, an opportunity of coming into close touch with the mental processes of that rare genius which first imparted something like actual color to English words. To be brought thus near to Keats suggests that poem by Browning where he speaks of a moment's interview with one who had seen Shelley, and compares it to picking up an eagle's feather on a lonely heath.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 7 (search)
subject to somnambulism and general frenzy; vast conspiracies were organized with small aims and smaller results. His books, published between 1798 and 1800, made their way across the ocean with a promptness that now seems inexplicable; and Mrs. Shelley, in her novel of The last man, founds her whole description of an epidemic which nearly destroyed the human race, on the masterly delineations of the author of Arthur Mervyn. Shelley himself recognized his obligations to Brown; and it is tShelley himself recognized his obligations to Brown; and it is to be remembered that Brown himself was evidently familiar with Godwin's philosophical writings, and that he may have drawn from those of Mary Wollstonecraft his advanced views as to the rights and education of women, a subject on which his first book, Alcuin, offered the earliest American protest. Undoubtedly his books furnished a point of transition from Mrs. Radcliffe, of whom he disapproved, to the modern novel of realism, although his immediate influence and, so to speak, his stage propert