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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 22 4 Browse Search
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matter a little I concluded to make the best of the situation. As in Virginia I should be operating in a field with which I was wholly unfamiliar, and among so many who were strangers, it seemed to me that it would be advisable to have, as a chief staff-officer, one who had had service in the East, if an available man could be found. In weighing all these considerations in my mind, I fixed upon Captain James W. Forsyth, of the Eighteenth Infantry, then in the regular brigade at Chattanooga — a dear friend of mine, who had served in the Army of the Potomac, in the Peninsula and Antietam campaigns. He at once expressed a desire to accept a position on my staff, and having obtained by the next day the necessary authority, he and I started for Washington, accompanied by Lieutenant T. W. C. Moore, one of my aides, leaving behind Lieutenant M. V. Sheridan, my other aide, to forward our horses as soon as they should be sent down to Chattanooga from Loudon, after which he was to join me.
onel John B. Howard, Chief-Quartermaster. Lieutenant-Colonel George H. Woods, Chief-Commissary of Subsistence. Surgeon Roger W. Pease, Medical Director. Captain Michael V. Sheridan, Aide-de-camp. Captain Thomas W. C. Moore, Aide-de-camp. escort. Sixth United States Cavalry, Captain Ira W. Claflin. first division. Brigadier-Generalrmation, General Meade became alarmed about his left flank, and sent me the following note: headquarters Army of the Potomac, May 6, 1864-1 o'clock P. M. Major-General Sheridan, Commanding Cavalry Corps: Your despatch of 11.45 A. M. received. General Hancock has been heavily pressed, and his left turned. The major-general cotion was immediately acted upon by General Meade, and a little later the following order came to me: headquarters Army of the Potomac. May 8th, 1864-1 P. M. General Sheridan, Commanding Cavalry Corps. The major-general commanding directs you to immediately concentrate your available mounted force, and with your ammunition trai
hington. I had with me Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Forsyth, chief-of-staff, and three of my aides, Major George A. Forsyth, Captain Joseph O'Keefe, and Captain Michael V. Sheridan. I rode my black horse, Rienzi, and the others their own respective mounts. Before leaving Cedar Creek I had fixed the route of my return to be by ad, and through him received the following reply from General Halleck: headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., October 16, 1864. To Major-General Sheridan, Rectortown, Va. General Grant says that Longstreet brought with him no troops from Richmond, but I have very little confidence in the information collrdered before leaving Cedar Creek. We spent that night at Martinsburg, and early next morning mounted and started up the Valley pike for Winchester, leaving Captain Sheridan behind to conduct to the army the Commissioners whom the State of New York had sent down to receive the vote of her troops in the coming Presidential electio
under General Davies and Colonels John I. Gregg and Smith. the Appomattox campaign. organization of the cavalry command on the morning of March 31, 1865. Major-General Philip H. Sheridan. Captain Thomas W. C. Moore, Aide-de-camp. Captain Michael V. Sheridan, Aide-de-camp. principal staff-officers: Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Forsyth, Chief-of-Staff. Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick C. Newhall, Adjutant-General. Colonel Frank T. Sherman, Inspector-General. Captain Andrew J. McGonnigle, Chief each column set out for its appointed duty, but shortly after the troops began to move I received from General Grant this despatch, which put a new phase on matters: headquarters armies of the United States, Gravelly Run, March 30, 1865. Major-General Sheridan: The heavy rain of to-day will make it impossible for us to do much until it dries up a little, or we get roads around our rear repaired. You may, therefore, leave what cavalry you deem necessary to protect the left, and hold such pos
nd rear of our infantry line was over, at least for the night. The enemy being thus checked, I sent a staff-officer-Captain Sheridan--to General Grant to report what had taken place during the afternoon, and to say that I proposed to stay at Dinwidment he received the first report of my situation; General Meade appreciated it too from the information he got from Captain Sheridan, en route to army headquarters with the first tidings, and sent this telegram to General Grant: headquarters of theant-General Grant: Would it not be well for Warren to go down with his whole corps and smash up the force in front of Sheridan? Humphreys can hold the line to the Boydton plank-road, and the refusal along with it. Bartlett's brigade is now on the Gravelly Run, he having gone down the White Oak road. Warren could go at once that way, and take the force threatening Sheridan in rear at Dinwiddie, and move on the enemy's rear with the other two. G. G. Meade, Major-General. An hour later