hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 970 results in 133 document sections:

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 21: administration of War Department (search)
follows: Perhaps you can suggest to General Sherman to ask for General Smith. It is a great Georgia. Hood, with an undefeated army which Sherman had failed to bring to bay, had been left beh in two again was very great, it is true that Sherman's divergent or eccentric movement made it pray of the Potomac was reviewed on Tuesday, and Sherman's two armies on Wednesday. Everything passederal Stoneman to pay no regard to orders from Sherman, and not to stop hostilities until they had rhe Secretary of War for having suppressed General Sherman's reports and letters. To this charge theaty with Johnston, or because the reports of Sherman have not been published. With regard to thesmmand Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Sherman's troops are now all camped just outside of Wccount of the meeting between Stanton and General Sherman, and what actually took place on the revie is here getting up his engineer's work from Sherman's campaigns, but I haven't seen him. Ulffers [30 more...]
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 22: beginning of a New era (search)
been discharged, the regular army would be increased to perhaps fifty thousand men, to be made up by retaining a sufficient number of the colored troops, and that the feeling was at that time against Washburne's bill to revive the grade of general, mainly because it was supposed that men who did not know General Grant as we did would think that the general himself was at the bottom of it. In the same letter he expressed his hearty approval of retaining such officers as Sickles, Robinson, T. W. Sherman, and McIntosh in the service till some other provision could be made for them, because each had lost a leg in battle. Shortly after his return to Chicago, he acknowledged the receipt of a letter from me written at Richmond, intimating that while in Washington a few days before I had discovered signs of a change of feeling towards him at General Grant's headquarters. This appeared to give him great concern, as it made him think there might be much less sense there than he would like t
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 23: period of reconstruction (search)
limitations were, nor better than he where his tactics were bad and his management defective; but it is to his credit that he confined his criticism, both then and afterwards, to the inner circle of those who shared his knowledge and concurred in the faith with which they predicted Grant's ultimate success. Curiously enough, Dana was never one of those who thought Grant made a mistake in giving up his position for life as General of the Army to accept the temporary office of President. Sherman and many others who knew him well frankly declared their distrust of his ability to sustain himself in civil life, or to compete successfully with experienced politicians and statesmen in managing national affairs; but Dana did not agree with them. He and I discussed the question frequently, both then and afterwards, and I am sure that while he made no effort to disguise his doubts, but relied mainly on Grant's good sense and his willingness to take counsel of those who had known him best
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 24: Grant's first administration (search)
ct fitness, and by hearty praise of the President for recalling the order by which he had placed the administration of the army and the military bureaus under the general-in-chief, and returned it to the Secretary of War, where the law puts it, the other newspapers, and especially the Tribune, were swift to attribute Dana's criticism, mild as it was, to personal disappointment. While Dana ridiculed this imputation, he held inflexibly to the independent course he had adopted. He declared Sherman to be an honest man, but did not hesitate to say that his acceptance of one hundred thousand dollars, with which to buy a home in Washington, made it undesirable that he should be placed in charge of business which was of such great concern to the army contractors. On March 29th Dana questioned the Tribune's prediction that Grant's administration would be a splendid one, but this seems to have been little more than a verbal criticism based upon the fact that the government is run mainly
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
38, 342, 344, 345. Sheridan, General, 262, 294, 304, 317,319, 321, 323, 324,326,427, 330, 332, 333, 338, 343-349, 356, 366, 367. Sherman, Charles, 363. Sherman, General T. W., 373. Sherman, General William T., 208, 209, 212, 220, 227, 230, 233, 243, 244, 246, 250, 251, 256, 268, 291-295, 299, 300, 302, 343, 345, 346, 350, 351,Sherman, General William T., 208, 209, 212, 220, 227, 230, 233, 243, 244, 246, 250, 251, 256, 268, 291-295, 299, 300, 302, 343, 345, 346, 350, 351, 355, 356, 361-364, 366-368, 388, 415. Sherman's Memoirs, 244. Shiloh, battle of, 191, 192, 282. Sickles, General, 373. Sigel, General, 337. Silver and bimetallism, 448. Slavery, 97-102, 110, 114-117, 119, 126, 127, 129, 130, 134, 136-139, 148, 151-154, 158, 160, 169, 179, 213, 217, 314, 445, 472, 473. Slidell, JohSherman's Memoirs, 244. Shiloh, battle of, 191, 192, 282. Sickles, General, 373. Sigel, General, 337. Silver and bimetallism, 448. Slavery, 97-102, 110, 114-117, 119, 126, 127, 129, 130, 134, 136-139, 148, 151-154, 158, 160, 169, 179, 213, 217, 314, 445, 472, 473. Slidell, John, 153. Slocum, General, 285, 329, 369. Smith's Crossing, 286. Smith, General A. J., 246, 351. Smith, General C. T., 190. Smith, General Giles A., 246. Smith, General John E., 496. Smith, General, Kirby, 236. 13 Smith's Plantation, 217. Smith, General William F. (Baldy), 269, 275, 280, 281, 283, 284, 291, 296, 299, 30
In the latter part of October a great fleet of war-ships and transports began to arrive at Old Point, and in a few days they were ready for their departure. So formidable an armament had never before assembled in the waters of America. The naval force was under the command of Capt. Dupont, flag-officer of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; it consisted of fifteen war-steamers; the land force was embarked in thirty steam vessels and six sailing ships, and was under the command of Gen. T. W. Sherman. The whole force fell very little below twenty-five thousand men. On the 3d of November the fleet was descried approaching the southern coast of South Carolina; and then for the first time it became apparent that the point they sought was Port Royal harbour. To defend the harbour and approaches to Beaufort, the Confederates had erected two sand forts-one at Hilton Head, called Fort Walker, and the other at Bay Point, called Fort Beauregard. The first had sixteen guns mounted, mos
groes, horses, and beeves for a cumbrous accompaniment. With the possible exception of the horde that set out to follow Sherman's march to the sea, this was the most curious column ever put in motion since that which defiled after Noah into the arkthe Union forces something over 30,000. General Banks' troops were commanded by Generals Weitzel, Auger, Grover, and T. W. Sherman, while the Confederate garrison was under Gen. Frank T. Gardner. The following extracts will show how the battery t Hudson with Generals Weitzel and Paine on right, General Grover and Colonel Dudley in center and Generals Auger and T. W. Sherman on the left. The artillery brigade under command of General Arnold. May 25. Battery ordered to relieve Battery Ls troops over-land to Alexandria, there to be joined by Gen. A. J. Smith with a force of about 10,000 men, detached from Sherman's army, who were to be transported up the river in company with Admiral Porter's fleet. At the same time it was expecte
when he left the farm in Sullivan and came to Boston, where in 1854 he bought a drug store on Cambridge Street and set up in business for himself. His first taste of a military career had been when, a boy of fifteen, he had joined the Sullivan Militia commanded by his brother. In 1853 he with his two brothers joined the Lancers and this branch of the militia of Massachusetts had no more ardent members than these three young men from New Hampshire. It happened that about this time General Sherman's Battery of United States artillery came to Boston from Newport for the purpose of giving an exhibition in encampment, parade, and drill on Boston Common. Young Nims saw the drill and was delighted; after this nothing would do for him but the artillery. Early in 1854 he enlisted in a new battery raised under command of Capt. Moses G. Cobb, and was made first sergeant on the night of his enlistment. After three years of service, he was made fourth lieutenant and later received comm
1Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Knowles, Osgood W., Corp.,25Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Leavitt, Edwin L., Corp.,29Boston, Ma.Oct. 10, 1861Died Aug. 5, 1862, Baton Rouge, La. Maxwell, Charles B., Corp.,29Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Merrill, Charles, Corp.,28Chelsea, Ma.Mar. 4, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Oliver, Charles E., Corp.,22Lunenburg, Ma.Jan. 4, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Sherman, Charles F.,20Watertown, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Short, John F., Corp.,28Lowell, Ma.Aug. 10, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Smith, John R., Corp.,26Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Sylvester, Charles S., Corp.,18Gloucester, Ma.Dec. 7, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Swart, John W., Corp.,22Pittsfield, Ma.Jan. 5, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Tyler, Thomas R., Corp.,24Charlestown, Ma.July 31, 186
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 45: an antislavery policy.—the Trent case.—Theories of reconstruction.—confiscation.—the session of 1861-1862. (search)
es were not represented. Among Northern senators were Wilson of Massachusetts, Morrill and Fessenden of Maine, Hale of New Hampshire, Foot and Collamer of Vermont, Preston King of New York, Wilmot of Pennsylvania, Trumbull of Illinois, Wade and Sherman of Ohio, and Chandler of Michigan. The presence most missed was that of Douglas, who died June 3. The session of July 9 was set apart for eulogies on Douglas, in which Trumbull and Collamer took part. Sumner, though inclined to pay tributesn the North, and crystallized public opinion. Its effects were soon seen in military orders and in speeches from public men, which pointed to a thorough policy against slavery. Secretary Camneron's instructions, Oct. 14, 1861, to Brigadier-General T. W. Sherman, and the latter's proclamation at Port Royal; Colonel John Cochrane's address to his regiment. Nov. 13, 1861, with Mr. Cameron's approving remarks; Wendell Philips's lecture on The War for the Union, in December, 1861; G. S. Boutwel
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...