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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 17 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies.. You can also browse the collection for Horatio G. Sickel or search for Horatio G. Sickel in all documents.

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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 2: the overture. (search)
d of fourteen full companies, being a special command for a veteran and brave officer, Colonel Horatio G. Sickel, Brevet Brigadier-General, and the 185th New York, a noble body of men of high capabiliment now commanded by Colonel Gustave Sniper, an able man and thorough soldier. Gregory and Sickel had both ranked me formerly as Colonels, but accepted the new relations with sincerity and utmosbe ready to take part as circumstances should require. Things being thus arranged, I placed General Sickel with eight companies on the right below the ruined bridge, with instructions to pour a hot f So we were in for it again and almost in cavalry fashion. Giving the right of the line to General Sickel and the left to Colonel Sniper on each side the road, I took Major Glenn with his six companhought had folded its wing; and near by, where wrecks were thickly strewn, I came upon brave old Sickel lying calm and cheerful, with a shattered limb, and weakened by loss of blood while fighting it
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 3: the White Oak Road. (search)
t will not do to stop for that now. My men will go straight through. So at a word the First Battalion of the 198th Pennsylvania, Major Glenn commanding, plunges into the muddy branch, waist deep and more, General Warren states in his testimony before the Court of Inquiry that this stream was sixty feet wide and four or five feet deep. Records, p. 717. with cartridge-boxes borne upon the bayonet sockets above the turbid waters; the Second Battalion commanded now by Captain Stanton, since Sickel and McEuen were gone, keeping the banks beyond clear of the enemy by their well-directed fire, until the First has formed in skirmishing order and pressed up the bank. I then pushed through to support Glenn and formed my brigade in line of battle on the opposite bank, followed by Gregory's in column of regiments. The enemy fell back without much resistance until finding supports on broken strong ground they made stand after stand. Griffin followed with Bartlett's Brigade, in reserve. In
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 4: Five Forks. (search)
vania lineal promotion in his regiment, though he had but few hours to live. But that grade was held by an accomplished gentleman detached from his regiment on office duties in the cities, and there was no place for Glenn. The colonel, dear old Sickel, was in hospital with an amputated arm, shattered at the Quaker Road three days before. Within that time this regiment had now lost in battle colonel, major, and adjutant, and all we could secure for the rest of the service, that great regiment of fourteen companies, was a major's rank. This, indeed, was worthily bestowed. It came to Captain John Stanton, who after the fall of Sickel and MacEuen had acted as a field officer with fidelity and honor, and had distinguished himself in the struggle for the flag snatched by Glenn with more than mortal energy and at mortal cost. By this time Warren had found Crawford, who with Baxter's Brigade had been pursuing Munford's dismounted cavalry all the way from where we had crossed the Whit
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
Brigade--the 187th, 188th, and 189th,--young in order of number, but veteran in experience and honor; worthy of the list held yet in living memory, the 12th, 13th, 14th, 17th, 25th, and 44th,--one by one gone before. One more brigade yet, of this division; of the tested last that shall be first: the splendid 185th New York, and fearless, clear-brained Sniper still at their head; the stalwart fourteen-company regiment, the Ig8th Pennsylvania, its gallant field officers gone: brave veteran Sickel fallen with shattered arm, and brilliant young Adjutant Maceuen shot dead, both within touch of my hand in the sharp rally on the Quaker Road; and Major Glen, since commanding, cut down on the height of valor, colors in hand, leading a charge I ordered in a moment of supreme need. Captain John Stanton, lately made major, leads to-day. These also coming into the bloody field of the dark year 1864, but soon ranked with veterans and wreathed with honor: In the last campaign opening with the