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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bagley, worth, 1874- (search)
Bagley, worth, 1874- Naval officer; born in Raleigh, N. C., April 6, 1874; was graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1895. After serving two years on the Montgomery, Texas, and the Maine, he was made ensign July 1897. He was a short time on the Indiana, and then became the executive clerk of Capt. Charles D. Sigsbee on the Maine. In November, 1897, he was appointed inspector of the new torpedo-boat Winslow. and when she went into commission on Dec. 28, he was made her executive officer, under Lieut. J. B. Bernadou, her commander. In April, 1898, the Winslow was with the fleet mobilized for operations in Cuban waters. On the morning of May 11 she prepared, with the Hudson and Wilmington, to force an entrance to the harbor of Cardenas. She was fired upon by one of several Spanish gunboats, and immediately there was a general engagement. the Winslow, was soon disabled, and was with difficulty hauled out of range of the Spanish guns. The guns of the enemy were silen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- (search)
Sigsbee, Charles Dwight 1845- Naval officer; born in Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1845; graduated at the United States Naval Academy in 1863; was promoted ensign in October of that year, and served in the West Gulf Squadron in 1863-64, Charles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic SCharles Dwight Sigsbee. taking part in the battle of Mobile Bay; served in the North Atlantic Squadron in 1865, being present at both engagements with Fort Fisher. He was promoted captain March 21, 1897, and placed in command of the battle-ship Maine, which was ordered to proceed to Havana in the latter part of January, 1898, for the purpose of paying a ceremonial visit, as is customary among the navies of the world. On ly destroyed at her assigned anchorage in Havana Harbor, by an explosion which drove her hull plates inward and upward (see Cuba). Soon after this catastrophe Captain Sigsbee was placed in command of the auxiliary cruiser St. Paul, and in the latter part of June destroyed the Spanish torpedo-boat Terror off San Juan, Porto Rico. I